Female Sexual Offender Annotated Bibliography by Author
Theresa M. Porter, PsyD
theresaporterpsyd@femaleaggression.info
Click here for list sorted by Author Click here for list sorted by Date Click here for list sorted by Category
Authors Year Title Journal Pages Publisher Editors Category
  1971 The Last Picture Show         Legal issues or research issues
a 1971 film based on 1966 novel by Larry McMurtry.  The wife of the high school athletics coach is sexual with a male high school senior.  
  1974 Emmanuelle         Legal issues or research issues
Emmanuelle is a 1974 softcore French film depicting sexual intimacy between an underage girl and an adult woman http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emmanuelle_(film)
  1994 Female Sexual Abuse of Children     New York: The Guilford Press Elliott, M. Child victim, adult perp
               
  1998 Sexually Aggressive Women: Current Perspectives and Controversies.      New York: The Guilford Press Anderson, P. B., & Struckman-Johnson, C. Adult victim, adult perp
               
  2004 National Center on Sexual Behavior of Youth  NCSBY Fact Sheet: What Research Shows About Female Adolescent Sex Offenders.       Child victim, adult perp
               
  2005 Treating sibling abuse families. Aggression and Violent Behavior 10, no. 5 (2005): 604-623     Child victim, adult perp
Sister-brother incest was 3rd largest group (10%), Sister-sister incest was least common (7%). 15% of the women reported being victims of Sister-sister physical assault and 10% of men reported a history of Sister-brother physical assault.
  2007 Female Sex Offenders     Center for Sex Offender Management.   Child victim, adult perp
               
  2009 Assessment and treatment of sex offenders: A handbook.     Wiley. com Beech, Anthony R., Leam A. Craig, and Kevin D. Browne Child victim, adult perp
Female perps use a reframing of their crime in a way similar to that noted by Denov 2001
  2009 More Children telling Childline about Female sex abusers  Press Release   NSPCC   Child victim, adult perp
               
  2009 Sexual Victimization in Juvenile Facilities Reported by Youth, 2008-2009  Special Report   Bureau of Justice Statistics, NCJ 228416   Child victim, adult perp
26,550 youths, 10.3% reported sexual victimization (contact) with staff, 95% of the staff perpetrators were female.
  2013 The Wiley-Blackwell Handbook of Legal and Ethical Aspects of Sex Offender Treatment and Management   321-338   Harrison, Karen & Bernadette Rainey Child victim, adult perp
chapter on female sex offenders reviews the issue, the need for ‘gender responsive’ approach
  2014 http://www.theguardian.co/books/2014/jun/27/sff-community-marion-zimmer-bradley-daughter-accuses-abuse          
Moira Greyland, Bradley's daughter, went public with her accusation onthe blog of the author Deirdre Saoirse Moen earlier this month, giving Moen permission to quote from an email in which she wrote: "The first time she molested me, I was three. The last time, I was 12, and able to walk away … She was cruel and violent, as well as completely out of her mind sexually. I am not her only victim, nor were her only victims girls."
               
Male victims of abuse had significantly higher rates of psychiatric treatment during the study period than general population controls.  Rates were higher for childhood mental disorders, personality disorders, anxiety disorders and major affective disorders, but not for schizophrenia. 22.8% of Male victims had treatment.
 
 
    Vagina Monologues           
The play is meant includes discussion about violence against women but the original included a the rape of a 13 yr old girl by a 24 yr old adult who used alcohol as a tool (The Little Coochi Snorcher that Could). It originally included the line "...if it was rape, it was a good rape."  It eventually was edited to move the victim's age to 16. 
    Statutory Rape A Guide to State Laws Reporting, Requirements, a Summary of Current State Laws        
Age of Consent: this is the age at which an individual can legally consent to sexual intercourse under any circumstance• Minimum Age of Victim: this is the age below which an individual cannot consent to sexual intercourse under any circumstance • Age Differential: if the victim is above the Minimum Age and below the Age of Consent, the age differential is the Maximum Difference in age between the victim and the defendant where an individual can legally consent to sexual intercourse • Minimum Age of Defendant in order to Prosecute: this is the age below which an individual cannot be prosecuted for engaging in sexual activities with minors • A common misperception about statutory rape is that state codes define a single age at which an individual can legally consent to sex.  Only 12 states have a single age of consent, below which an individual can’t consent to intercourse under any circumstance
    http://www.socraddockmethod.com/can-a-woman-rape-a-man/          
 
    http://rebrn.com/re/this-is-how-mary-p-koss-one-of-the-most-prominent-feminist-resea-648696/   So what do we call it when a woman forces another woman to have sex without consent?          
 
    https://plus.google.com/wm/trollface-meme_www.trollize.com_viral-videos-funny-lol/communities/112326066630207633294  male survivors site          
 
    Bilitis         Legal issues or research issues
is a 1977 French film depicting sexual intimacy between an underage girl and an adult woman.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bilitis_(film)
    It was A Woman         Legal issues or research issues
It Was A Woman documentary by a victim of sexual abuse by a female perpetrator. Includes interviews with Franca Cortoni (researcher), Rick Goodwin (The Men's Project) and Julie Brand (survivor/educator). She also discusses gender role expectations and how they interfere with perceiving the abuse.  www.itwasawoman.com/IWAW/IWAW_ONESHEET.pdf
    APRI State Rape Statutes compiled by the America Prosecutors Research Institute         Legal issues or research issues
Each US state has multiple charge options: Alaska: Sexual Abuse of a minor (Class A,B, or C felony) Arizona: sexual Conduct w/ minor (Class 6) California: Unlawful sexual intercourse w/ a minor (misdemeanor if victim is over 16) Colorado: Sexual Assault (Misdemeanor if victim is 15+); sexual assault ona child/in a positon of trust (class 4 of victim 15+) Florida: Sexual Battery (3rd degree if person is in postion of authority) Iowa: sexual exploitation of a minor (class ); sexual misonduct with juvenile offenders (aggravated misdemeanor) Kansas: Criminal Sodomy (Class B misdemeanor if w/ smae sex victim 16+ or animal/ Felony 3 if victim is 14-16) Maine: Sexual Abuse of Minors (class C if incest or perp is 10+ yrs older than victim; class D if perp is shool employee and victim is -18); Unlawful sexual contact (class E if 16+ yr old and perp is shool employee).  New Mexico: Criminal Sexual ontact with a minor (4th degree felony) New York: Sexual Conduct against a child (class B or  felony) North Carolina: Statutory rape of 13-15 r old (class  if perp is 6+ yrs older) North Dakota: Corruption of minor (class C if victim is 15+); Ohio: Unlawful sexual conduct with a minor (3rd degree felony) Oregon: Contributing to a sexual delinquency of a minor (misdemeanor) Pennsylvania: Statutory sexual assault (2nd degree felony) Tennessee: Statutory Rape (lass E felony) Utah: Unlawful sexual conduct with 16+ yr old (3rd degree felony)
    Zimbio's 50 most Infamous female teacher sex scandals 3/29/12         Legal issues or research issues
 • Elizabeth Stow: 1 year • Mary Kay Letourneau: Two counts of statutory rape; initially sentenced to 6 months, didn’t have to Register as Sex Offender; violated this plea agreement w/in 4 weeks; • Debra LaFave  Lewd or Lascivious Battery (oral sex and intercourse) with 14 year old; three years of Community Control (house arrest), seven years of probation. House arrest was allowed to end 4 months early. • Abbie Jane Swogger Included involuntary deviate sexual intercourse, corruption of minors and possession with intent to deliver crack cocaine, victims 14-17, sentenced to three to six years in jail, special education teacher's aide • Pamela Rogers Turner Felony sexual battery by an authority figure Age of Student:  13; sentenced to nine months in prison, part of an eight-year suspended sentence. However, she was arrested again in April, 2006, for sending the same student sexual pictures and videos of herself, as well as contacting him through blogs and social networks.  ordered her to serve the remaining seven years of her sentence in state prison • Nicole Long:  45 days 90 days in jail and lost her teaching license • Stephanie Ragusa Felony sex with a minor and lewd and lascivious battery  students 14-16; 10 years jail, possibly due to arrogance in court and having abused 2 different victims. The encounters continued even after she had been arrested and told to stay away from him. • Lisa Lavoie: 5 years probation • Alison Peck  Two counts second-degree statutory rape and sodomy, 13 year old victim, arrested twice, second time was after having been told to stay away from victim; November 2009, the former teacher was convicted for a relationship with a 16-year-old student the previous winter and spring, put on probation, violated it by failing to register as sex offender and must serve 5 years  • Shannon Best Misdemeanor attempted crime against nature and giving alcohol to a student  $250 fine, suspended 45-day jail sentence, placed on 18 months of probation, and paid a $250 fine. She was not required to register as a sex offender.  • Jill Lewis One count improper relationship between an educator and a student verdict pending. • Amy McElhenney: loss of teaching certificate. One count of improper relationship with a student • Carrie McCandless One felony count of sexual assault on a child by one in a position of trust and contributing to the delinquency of a minor.  sentenced to 45 days in jail. In March of 2009, she returned briefly to jail for violating the terms of her parole by drinking alcohol and being found in the bed of another parolee. • Traci Tapp Harassment by offensive touching., 15 year old student; pleaded guilty this week to having sexual encounters with three male students walked away with no jail time or probation • Beth Geisel Two felony charges of rape in the third degree and two charges of endangering the welfare of a minor  will serve six months in jail, receive alcohol counseling when she's released, and will be on the sex offender registry. • Jennifer Mally: 6 months  Three counts of sexual conduct with a minor • Natasha Sizow Two counts each of indecent liberties and use of a communications device to facilitate crimes against children, all charges were later dropped • Autumn Leathers Second-degree custodial child abuse, fourth-degree sex offense, perverted practice, and second-degree assault  15 year old student; pleaded guilty to one count of fourth-degree sex offense, and all other charges were dropped. She was given a one-year suspended jail sentence, and required to register as a sex offender  • Elizabeth Stow 12 counts of sexual intercourse with a minor,
oral copulation with a minor  given a suspended sentence of nine years, and was required to serve one year in a county jail. • Cris Morris: 30 days (served over 15 weekends)  Three counts of third-degree felony unlawful sexual conduct with a 16- or 17-year-old. • Carmina Lopez 11 yr old student; 40 counts of lewd act with a child, 40 counts of unlawful sexual intercourse with a minor, continuous sexual abuse of a child, aggravated sexual assault of a child under 14 years of age, sexual battery, cruelty to a child, annoying or molesting a child under 18 years of age, 11 counts of failure to report child abuse by a mandated reporter; defense attorney said the boy raped the woman and threatened to claim molestation if she told anyone; acquitted • Margaret De Barraicua Felony improper relationship between an educator and student; sentenced to one year in jail.2009 violated her probation • Lisa Robyn Marinelli  Unlawful sex with a minor; sentenced to a year of house arrest, and was required to register as a sex offender • Samantha Solomon No charges filed; She was fired from the position. She admitted to investigators that she had sexual intercourse • Jennifer Lea Burton; 14 year old Female victim; Three counts of sexual assault and three counts of improper relationship between an educator and student; got 10 years • Sarah Tolzien  Eight counts of criminal sexual assault and 24 counts of aggravated criminal sexual abuse.  sentenced to 18-months of probation, and she must register as a sex offender for the next ten years.  The 25-year-old also lost her teacher’s license • Hope Jacoby victim under 17; Oral copulation of a minor and unlawful sex with a minor; sentenced to 3 years probation • Cameo Patch: no jail time. Judge Mark Kouris “if this was a 29 year old male and a 17 year old female, I would be inclined to order some incarceration”. Unlawful sexual conduct with a 16- or 17-year-old • Angela Comer 14 yr old victim; One count of third-degree sodomy and one count of custodial interference; both Comer and the boy went missing, along with Comer's 4-year-old son. They were found two weeks later by Mexican authorities in a hotel in Nuevo Laredo, Mexico; saying the 14-year-old abducted her, held her at gunpoint, and forced her to drive to Mexico. She says the boy also broke a guitar over her head when she attempted to escape; will serve 10 years • Cara Dickey 14 yr old victim; Two counts of second-degree statutory rape, 4 year prison sentence • Rebekah Todd  Felony attempted second-degree sexual assault • Rebecca Bogard 15 yr old victim; Exploitation of a child, touching of a child for lustful purposes, and statutory rape. 1 year in prison, 7 yrs probation • Sandra Binkley Statutory rape and sexual abuse by an authority
figure  claimed she was the victim in the case  12 years.  • Janelle Batkins Felony improper relationship between an educator and student; 17 yr old student; Batkins had a 21 year old son;  3 years’ probation and 240 hours of community service  • Lindsay Massaro victim less than 16; Second-degree sexual assault,
third-degree endangering the welfare of a minor and fourth-degree criminal sexual contact. four-year prison sentence with parole supervision for life • Christine Brown Jouini  Four felony counts of unlawful sexual activity • Teresa Engelbach 14 yr old victim; Three counts of statutory rape and one count of statutory sodomy.$5,000 fine and 2 years probation;  • Carrie O'Connor One count sexual assault against a student by a
school teacher or administrator. • Deanna Bobo 14 year old victim; Two counts of first-degree sexual assault 12 years, eligible for parole after 2 years • Rachel Burkhart No charges, resigned from teaching position  • Gwen Cardozo   Sexual assault on a child by a person in a position of trust. Got Probation • Katherine J. Harder  Felony aggravated endangering of a child  suspended 12 month jail sentence • Rhianna Ellis  No charges filed • Loni Folks  One charge of sexual battery; suspended 12 year sentence • Stephanie Ann Stein 15 yr old victim; Two counts third-degree criminal sexual conduct, sending sexually explicit photographs to a minor, using a computer to send sexually explicit photographs to a minor; 3-15 years • Sheral Smith 14 yr old victim; Statutory rape and transfer of a controlled substance. 7 yrs • Melinda Deluca Two counts of felony forcible sexual abuse  90 days in jail • Kenzi Friday  Felony improper relationship between an educator and student   No Jail, 5 yrs probation and $2,000.   • Kesha D. Manuel  15 yr old victim; Felony carnal knowledge of
a juvenile; five years of active probation
 
 
 
 Vandiver,D.M.,& Braithwaite,J. 2009 Male and female juvenile sex offenders: Examing recidivism rates as adults The Journal of Best Knowledge and Practies of Juveile offenders  3(1), 23-32     Legal issues or research issues
http://www.pvamu.edu/include/College%20of%20Juvenile%20Justice%20and%20Psychology/Journal%20juvenile%20JusticeWeb2009.pdf  N=61 juvenile FSOs and N=122 juvenile MSOs from Texas registry in 2001, followed for average 4.25 years AFTER becoming a legal adult (17th birthday). Only 46& of FSOs were re-arrested for any type of offense during adulthood (during follow up period) and there was no statistical significance between MSOs and FSOs in re-arrest for sexual offenses.   84% of the FSOs had been arrested for aggravated sexual assault or sexual assault, 35% for indecency with child.  No statistical difference in victim age.  
Abel, G & Wiegel, M. 2009 Visual Reaction Time Sex Offenders: Identification, Risk Assessment, Treatment, and Legal Issues 110-113 Oxford U Press Saleh, FM, Grudzinskas, A, Bradford, JM & Brodsky DJ Assessment or treatment related
Discussed Chivers’ work on vaginal photoplethysmograph; can’t use to detect deviant sexual arousal in women due to female indiscriminant arousal patterns. Discussed studies that suggest Visual Reaction time is appropriate for assessment w/ female sex offenders; is a valid measure of their sexual interest.
Abramson, P. R., & Pinkerton, S. D. 2001 A house divided: Suspicions of mother–daughter incest.      New York: Norton   Child victim, adult perp
               
Abramson,P.R. & Pinkerton,S.D 2001 A house divided-Suspicions of mother-daughter incest     New York: Norton   Legal issues or research issues
 
Ackerman, A.R., Harris, A.J, Levenson J.S., & Zgoba, K. 2011 Who are the people in your neighborhood? A descriptive analysis of individuals on public sex offender registries. International Jornal of law and psychiatry 34(3) 149-159     Adult victim, adult perp
Created a national profile of the registered sex offender population for US, Puerto Rico and Guam.   Females make up 2.3% overall, with higher percentages in Louisiana (6.9%), Wyoming (5.1%), Guam (6%), Missouri (3%), Montana (3%), NC (3%), Ohio, (3%), Puerto Rico (3%), Tennessee (3%), WV (4%), Wisconsin (3%).  
Acton, W. M. 1865 The Functions and Disorders of the Reproductive Organs in Childhood, Youth, Adult Age, and Advanced Life, considered in their Physiological, Social, and Moral Relations.  The American Journal of the Medical Sciences 49(98), 468     Out-dated, erroneous, etc.
claimed that women weren’t “bothered” by sexual feelings.
Acton, W.M. 1865 The Functions and Disorders of the Reproductive Organs in Childhood, Youth, Adult Age, and Advanced Life considered in their Physiological, Social, and Moral Relations The American Journal of the Medical Sciences 49(98) 468     Adult victim, adult perp
Claimed that women weren't "bothered" by sexual feelings.  
Adams, E. M. 1988 Sex of the Victim, Offender, and Helper: The Effects of Gender Differences on Attributions and Attitudes in Cases of Incest  Unpublished Ph.D. dissertation   Columbus, OH: The Ohio State University.   Child victim, adult perp
               
Adams, E.M. 1988 Sex of the Victim, Offender and Helper: The effects of Gender Differences on Attributions and Attitudes in Case of Incest Unpublished PhD. Disseration. Columbus, OH. The Ohio State Unversity       Adult victim, adult perp
 
Adams, Kenneth 1991 Silently Seduced: When Parents Make their Children Partners – Understanding Covert Incest.      Deerfield Beach, FL: Health Communications, Inc   Child victim, adult perp
               
Adshead, G. Howett, M & Mason,F. 1994 Women who sexually abuse children: The undiscovered county Journal of Sexual Aggression: An international, interdisciplinary forum for research, theory, and practice 1(1), 45-56     Child victim, adult perp
Provides stats on female sex offenders in England/Wales and gives literature preview.
Adshead, G., Howett, M. & Mason, F. 1994 Women who sexually abuse children: The undiscovered country.  Journal of Sexual Aggression: An international, interdisciplinary forum for research, theory and practice 1(1), 45-56     Child victim, adult perp
provides stats on female sex offenders in England/Wales and gives literature review.
Agardh, A., Oderg-Pettersson, K., & Ostergren, P.O. 2011 Experience of sexual coercion and risky sexual behavior among Ugandan university students BMC publc health 11(1), 527     Adult victim, adult perp
N=980 university students; 29% of males had experienced sexual coercion
Aizenman, M., & Kelley, G. 1988 The Incidence of Violence and Acquaintance Rape in Dating Relationships among College Men and Women. Journal of College Student Development 29(4), 305-311     Adult victim, adult perp
               
Aizenman,M.& Kelley,G. 1988 The Incidence of Violence and Acquaintance Rape in Dating Relationships among College Men and Women Journalof Colledge Student Development 29(4), 305-311     Adult victim, adult perp
N=400 each male/female undergrads; used questionnaires of their heterosexual relationships experiences and abuse.  7% of males reported experiencing violence.
Alaggia, R. 2005 Disclosing the trauma of child sexual abuse: A gender analysis.  Journal of Loss and Trauma 10, 453-470     Assessment or treatment related
Includes single case of female perpetrator
Alaggia, R. 2010 An Ecological Analysis of Child Sexual Abuse Disclosure: Considerations for Child and Adolescent Mental Health  Journal of the Canadian Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry 19(1), 32-39     Assessment or treatment related
               
Alaggia, R., & Millington, G. 2008 Male child sexual abuse: A phenomenology of betrayal  Journal of Clinical Social Work 36, 265-275     Specifically on male victims
               
Alarid, L. F. 2000 Sexual Assault and Coercion among Incarcerated Women Prisoners: Excerpts from Prison Letters.  The Prison Journal 80 (4), 391-406     Adult victim, adult perp
In this study, heterosexual ‘femme’ females were noted as the sexual aggressor and there was apathy among female inmates regarding the sexual coercion and assault.
Alexander, P. C., Teti, L., & Anderson, C. L. 2000 Childhood sexual abuse history and role reversal in parenting Child Abuse & Neglect 24(6), 829-838     Child victim, adult perp
Community sample of 90 mothers of 5-8 yr old kids. 19 mothers reported history of childhood sexual victimization. Survivors with ‘unsatisfactory intimate relationships’ were more likely to endorse items suggesting emotional overdependence upon the child. Wasn’t related to child’s gender, parenting stress or kid’s behavior.
Allen, C. M. 1990 Women as perpetrators of child sexual abuse: Recognition barriers.  The Incest Perpetrator: A Family Member No One Wants To Treat 108-125 Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications Inc. Horton, A. L., Johnson, A. L., Roundy, B. L., & Williams, L. M. Child victim, adult perp
               
Allen, C. M. 1991 Women and Men Who Sexually Abuse Children: A Comparative Analysis.      Orwell, VT: Safer Society Press   Child victim, adult perp
               
Allen, C. M., & Pothast, H. L. 1994 Distinguishing Characteristics of Male and Female Child Sex Abusers.  Journal of Offender Rehabilitation 21(1-2), 73-88     Child victim, adult perp
               
Allen, H. 1987 Justice unbalanced: Gender, psychiatry and judicial decisions.      Philadelphia, PA: Open University Press.   Legal issues or research issues
               
Allen, H. 1987 Rendering them harmless: The professional portrayal of women charged with serious violent crimes.  Gender, crime and justice 81-94     Legal issues or research issues
               
Allen, Tina M. 2003 Gender-Neutral Statutory Rape Laws: Legal Fictions Disguised as Remedies to Male Child Exploitation Comment    2002-2003 111-126 University of Detroit Mercy Law Review   Legal issues or research issues
               
Allen,Tina M 2002-03 Gender-Neutral Statutory Rape Laws: Legal Fictions disguised as Remedies to Male Child Exploitation Comment University of Detroit Mercy Law Review 111-126     Legal issues or research issues
 
Almond, L., McManus, M.A., Giles, S., & Houston, E. 2015 Female Sex Offenders. An Analysis of Crime Scene Behaviors. Journal of interpersonal violence 0886260515603976       Legal issues or research issues
Used crime scene analysis on N=73 FSOs in UK and US, only 16% included male co-offender, 18% offended against a relative.  Looked for behaviors that distinguished motivations. Control: 17% cases where perp interacted with victim as a sexual object, used victim to satisfy own sexual gratification, used victim for instrumental gains such as making porn.  Hostility: 15% made victim the target of anger and frustration, used greater violence or force than was necessary, caused injuries, penetrated victim with an object rather than body part (male rapists do this to humiliate/demean victim). Involvement: 52% have pseudo-intimate interactions with victim, uses term 'love' grooms victim with gifts and alcohol, requires victim to penetrate her.  Note: Non-Involvement cases made up 32% of cases and their theory did not account for 100% of the cases.
American Association of University Women 2001 Hostile Hallways      Washington, D.C.: AAUW Educational Foundation   Adult victim, adult perp
               
Anderson P. B., & Aymani R. 1993 Reports of female initiation of sexual contact: Male and female differences.  Archives of Sexual Behavior 22(4), 335-343.     Adult victim, adult perp
Women's reports of initiating sexual contact and men's reports of experiencing female initiation were compared. 128 male and 212 female college students were recruited from sexuality classes at three institutions. It was hypothesized that there would be no significant difference between women's reports of initiating sexual contact and men's reports of experiencing female initiation. A chi-square test of significance at the p <0.05 level with an alpha rate adjustment (p <0.002) using the Bonferroni technique was implemented. Of 26 questionnaire items, 15 registered significant differences between male and female reports (p <0.002). Overall, males reported experiencing female initiation more frequently than females reported initiating. Traditional gender roles may influence male and female perceptions of female initiation of sexual contact in a way that contributes to significant differences in reporting.
Anderson, I., & Swainson, V. 2001 Perceived motivation for rape: Gender differences in beliefs about female and male rape.  Current Research in Social Psychology 6(8), 107-122     Legal issues or research issues
Students view rape of both males and females as motivated by sex more than by power.
Anderson, Irina 1999 Characterological and behavioral blame in conversations about female and male rape. Journal of Language and Social Psychology 18 (4) 377-394     Legal issues or research issues
Used vignettes to describe a stranger rape of male or female victim, but used only male perps.
Anderson, Irina, and Alison Quinn 2009 Gender differences in medical students' attitudes towards male and female rape victims. Psychology Health and Medicine 14, no. 1 (2009): 105-110     Legal issues or research issues
Negative attributions towards male victims
Anderson, L.M., Lowry, L..S. & Wuensch, K.L. 2015 Racial Differences in Adolescents' Answering Questions About Suicide Death studies pages 01-05     Specifically on male victims
Analyzed data from Youth & Risk Behavior Survey 2009 and 2011, N=31,000 teens ages 14-18 yrs regarding suicide attempts within a year of the survey.  Only 3.5% of boys without sexual victimization histories attempted suicide but 33.2% of boys with history of sexual victimization attempted suicide within last year. Author felt it was related to stigma, lack of support system. 
Anderson, N., & Ho-Foster, A. 2008 13,915 reasons for equity in sexual offences legislation: A national school-based survey in South Africa. International Journal for Equity in Health 7(20), 1-6     Child victim, adult perp
Prior to 2007, forced sex with male children in South Africa did not count as rape but as "indecent assault", a much less serious offence. This study sought to document prevalence of male sexual violence among school-going youth. A facilitated self-administered questionnaire in nine of the 11 official languages in a stratified (province/ metro/ urban/r ural) last stage random national sample. Setting: Teams visited 5162 classes in 1191 schools, in October and November 2002. Participants: A total of 269,705 learners aged 10–19 years in grades 6–11. Of these, 126,696 were male. Main outcome measures: Schoolchildren answered questions about exposure in the last year to insults, beating, unwanted touching and forced sex. They indicated the sex of the perpetrator, and whether this was a family member, a fellow schoolchild, a teacher or another adult. Respondents also gave the age when they first suffered forced sex and when they first had consensual sex. Results: Some 9% (weighted value based on 13915/127097) of male respondents aged 11–19 years reported forced sex in the last year. Of those aged 18 years at the time of the survey, 44% (weighted value of 5385/11450) said they had been forced to have sex in their lives and 50% reported consensual sex. Perpetrators were most frequently an adult not from their own family, followed closely in frequency by other schoolchildren. Some 32% said the perpetrator was male, 41% said she was female and 27% said they had been forced to have sex by both male and female perpetrators. Male abuse of schoolboys was more common in rural areas while female perpetration was more an urban phenomenon. Conclusion: This study uncovers endemic sexual abuse of male children that was suspected but hitherto only poorly documented. Legal recognition of the criminality of rape of male children is a first step. The next steps include serious investment in supporting male victims of abuse, and in prevention of all childhood sexual abuse
Anderson, P. B. 1993 Sexual victimization: It happens to boys, too.  Louisiana Association for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance Journal 57(1), 5, 12.     Specifically on male victims
               
Anderson, P. B. 1996 Correlates of College Women's Self-Reports of Heterosexual Aggression  Sexual Abuse: a Journal of Research and Treatment 8 (2), 121-131     Adult victim, adult perp
N=212 students, anonymous questionnaire of sexual behaviors including initiating sexual contact, using sexual coercion (threatening to end a relationship, verbal pressure, or lying), sexual abuse (sex with a minor by an adult at least 5 years older than the minor, by inducing intoxication, or by using a position of power or authority), or physically forced sex (by the threat of physical force, actual physical force, or the use of a weapon). 28.5% of the women reported a history of using some form of coercion. 8.5% of the women admitted threatening to end a relationship if the male didn’t agree to sex, 11.3% used verbal tactics, 10.4% questioned his sexuality, 3.8% threatening to use physical force and 7.1% used physical force. 14.7% reported getting the male partner intoxicated in order to have sex. Past victimization only explained 4.5% of the variance. Only 4.9% of the variance was explained by the adversarial beliefs.
Anderson, P. B. 1998 Variations in college women's self-reported heterosexual aggression  Sex Abuse: A Journal of Research and Treatment 10(4), 283-92     Adult victim, adult perp
The purpose of this study was to provide an examination of differences in college women's self-reported heterosexual aggression between two samples. One sample of college women was drawn from three colleges in and around New York City (East; N = 212) and one was drawn from a midsized commuter university in Louisiana (South; N = 249). The respondents were questioned about their lifetime initiation of heterosexual activity. Approximately 28.5% of the women from the East reported engaging in sexually initiatory behaviors traditionally defined as sexual coercion, 21.1% in sexual abuse, and 7.1% in physically forced sex. The women in the sample from the South also reported engaging in sexual coercion (25.7%), sexual abuse (7.3%), and physically forced sex (1.6%), but at lower rates than the other sample. “college women are behaving in some ways that are not stereotypic of their gender role expectations, are sexually aggressive toward men in some instances, and may pose a risk for being involved in sexually aggressive episodes”.
Anderson, P. B. 1998 Women’s motives for sexual initiation and aggression Sexually Aggressive Women: Current Perspectives and Controversie 79-93 New York: The Guilford Press P. B. Anderson & C. Struckman-Johnson Child victim, adult perp
               
Anderson, P. B., & Newton, M. 1997 The initiating heterosexual contact scale: A factor analysis  Sex Abuse: A Journal of Research and Treatment 9 (3) 179-186     Adult victim, adult perp
N=212 college women, used survey of self-reported initiated of sexual contact with men. Found 6 factors on measure which accounted for 59.8% of variance: Sexual Arousal, Hidden Motives (jealousy, to end a relationship with another man), Verbal Pressure (threaten to end relationship), Retaliation or Gain (sex with someone in position of authority over you), Physical Force, and Exploitation (to gain power over him, while he was intoxicated).
Anderson, P. B., & Newton, M. 2004 Predicting the use of sexual initiation tactics in a sample of college women.http://content.lib.utah.edu/cdm/singleitem/collection/uspace/id/789  Electronic Journal of Human Sexuality 7     Adult victim, adult perp
               
Anderson, P. B., & Savage, J. S. 2005 Social, Legal, and Institutional Context of Heterosexual Aggression by College Women.  Trauma, Violence, & Abuse 6(2), 130-140     Legal issues or research issues
women engage in the full range of sexually aggressive behaviors attributed to men; the language of many legal codes place women’s heterosexually aggressive behaviors below the threshold for rape even when it involves physical force or the use of a weapon; many men, similar to many women, do not report receiving sexual aggression and may not define themselves as victims; regardless of reporting status or self-perception, some men do suffer physical and psychological symptoms as a result of receiving sexual aggression from women; and women’s heterosexual aggression may be more socially acceptable than men’s.
Anderson, P. B., & Sorenson, W. 1999 Male and female differences in reports of women’s heterosexual initiation and aggression.  Archives of Sexual Behavior 28(3), 285-295     Adult victim, adult perp
Previous work that compared male and female reports of women’s heterosexual initiation and aggression is replicated. It was hypothesized that men’s reports of women’s sexual initiation and aggression would be significantly greater than women’s self-report of sexual initiation and aggression in the most recent sample. N=82 males Of the 24 questionnaire items, 12 of the 17 specifically designed to assess sexual initiation or aggression demonstrated significant reporting differences. For every questionnaire item, except “mutually consenting contact,” men reported women initiating sexual contact more often than women self-reported. In addition, comparisons were made to determine the level of agreement between the results of this study and a previous study in which the same comparisons were made with a different sample. It was hypothesized that the identical questionnaire items would demonstrate significant gender-based reporting differences in both samples. This hypothesis was mostly supported with 11 items showing a significant difference in both samples. In both samples, males reported receiving female initiation and aggression more frequently than females reported giving. Logistic regression results supported a difference in perception of women’s sexual initiation based on gender of respondent. In both samples men see women’s initiation as less conforming to traditional social norms for women and more aggressive than women do. Gender role expectations and social desirability may influence male and female perceptions of female heterosexual initiation and aggression in a way that contributes to significant differences in reporting. For those 13 items that relate specifically to sexually aggressive behaviors, men reported significantly more aggression by women than women self-reported on 9 items (New Orleans.) and 11 items (N.Y.), respectively. 36% of the males reported experiencing sexual aggression by women when he was a minor, 58% when he was drunk. 3.7% of the women admitted to attempting to have sex with a minor who was 5+ years younger than herself.
Anderson, P. B., Kontos, A. P., Tanigoshi, H., & Struckman?Johnson, C. 2005 An examination of sexual strategies used by urban southern and rural Midwestern university women. Journal of sex research (2005)., 42(4), 335-341.     Adult victim, adult perp
135 women reported using non-physical coercion strategies, 174 reported using persuasion strategies, 23 reported using physical force strategies. The physical forced set reported earlier age of first intercourse than other groups, reported making more total telephone calls per week to males during adolescence (and to more separate boys rather than just same boy over and over). Clements-Schreiber, Rempel, and Desmarais (1998) attributed women's likely use of both overt (e.g., undress him, touch him, kiss him) and covert (e.g., get him drunk, make him jealous) pressure tactics to obtain sex from a reluctant man to beliefs in the stereotype of a male dependent sex drive for married women and to the belief that women's sex drive is at least as strong as a man's for single women. The authors concluded that the acceptance of sexual stereotypes differentially effected married women and single women in their likely use of pressure tactics. Struckman-Johnson (1988), reported that sixteen percent of male participants admitted being forced into unwanted heterosexual activity by a partner, but only 2% of female respondents reported forcing males into sexual activity in their lifetime. In a follow-up survey, the majority of males who had experienced forced sex (52% of 124), reported being forced into unwanted sex based upon psychological strategies (e.g., lying, guilty for not wanting to engage in sex, and blackmail). Furthermore, 25% of 124 males reported experiencing a combination of physical force and psychological tactics. The authors suggested that males and females both express behaviors that are sexually exploitative and range from verbal pressure to use of physical restraint and force. Anderson and Aymani (1993) stated that males reported being recipients of female aggression more than females admitted to being aggressors. The largest difference between male and female reports (41.1%) was recorded on a question measuring female adults' initiation of sex with male minors. The next largest difference was observed on the question asking each gender their account of a woman initiating sex with a man when his judgment was impaired by alcohol or drugs (30.2%). Discrepancies were concluded to be the result of sexual socialization of women and sexual stereotypes of men. Women were believed to have answered the survey partially focusing on socially desirable responses and partially on the myth that men will never turn down a sexual opportunity. In a follow-up study, Anderson and Sorensen (1999) concluded that men reported significantly more events of adult women initiating sexual contact with them while they were minors (OR=10.9), by getting them drunk or high (OR=3.7), and by threatening to end their relationship (OR=6.3) than women reported. All questions, except the one assessing mutually consenting sexual activity, showed some difference in the expected direction (i.e., men reported that women were more likely to initiate or be aggressive than women self-reported). The authors concluded that women may interpret their sexual aggression as more normal than do men. In addition to gender difference, discrepancies have also been highlighted in reports of sexual aggression between groups of women themselves. Women from different regions have been documented to report different rates in the use of sexual coercion, abuse, and physical force. Anderson (1998) reported that women from the South reported less overall aggression (34.1% vs. 46.2%), sexual abuse (7.3% vs. 21.1%), and physically forced sex (1.6% vs. 7.1%) but not less sexual coercion (all differences were significant at p < .001). Regional differences were interpreted as variations in global dating messages and gender scripts for each area. Despite the similarity of the samples, other factors (i.e. ethnicity, religion, peer group) in addition to region were discussed as being contributing factors.
Anderson, P.B., & Melson, D.T. 2002 From deviance to normalcy  Women as sexual aggressors Electronic Journal of Human Sexuality 5     Specifically on male victims
reviewed some of the early literature on female sexual coercion towards adult males
Anderson, P.B.; Sergey Lebedev; Radik M. Masagutov; Jennifer Fagen 2009 The impact of ethnicity, and economic, social, and marital status on differences in the frequency of sexually aggressive behaviors among women living in Ufa, Russian Federation.  Electronic Journal of Human Sexuality Volume 12, Feb. 3, 2009     Child victim, adult perp
The present study is the first report of women’s sexual aggression gathered from a sample of women in Ufa, Russian Federation. The research question was: do women of different ethnicities, living in the Russian Federation, who are of different economic, social, and marital status, differ in their frequency of sexually aggressive behaviors. One hundred and twenty one primarily single (69.4%), heterosexual (88.4%), middle class (73.6%) women with a mean age of 23.1 (SD = 8.3) completed the questionnaire. Differences is sexually aggressive behaviors were found between women who were married vs. single, middle vs. upper class, Russian vs. Ukrainian, and clerks vs. students. The results provide new evidence of women’s sexual aggression outside of the United States and Western Europe. Support was found for previous reports about women’s sexual aggression and new possibilities for theory building are presented. It has been argued that the most commonly studied variables used to explain women’s heterosexual aggression (e.g., past sexual abuse, stereotypical beliefs about sexuality) are not sufficient to explain the majority of the variance in this behavior and that other behavioral, cultural, and contextual variables need more scrutiny ( Anderson, Kontos, Tanigoshi, & Struckman-Johnson, 2005; Anderson & Savage, 2005)
Anderson,P.B., Sergey Lebedey, Radik, M. Masagutoy, Jennifer Eagen 2008 The impact of ethnicity and economic, social, and marital status on differences in the frequency of sexually aggressive behaviors among women liing in Ufa, Russian Federation.  Electronic Journal of Human Sexuality Volume 12      Adult victim, adult perp
 
Andersson, Neil, and Ari Ho-Foster. 2008 13,915 reasons for equity in sexual offences legislation: A national school-based survey in South Africa.  International Journal for Equity in Health 7, no. 1 (2008): 20. 2008     Specifically on male victims
Of 126,696 male students ages 10-19 in South Africa 55% reported being forced into sex at least once, with 41% of the perps female and another 27% having been forced by both male/female, 9% of male students reported forced sex w/o consent in the last year, 14% of 10 yr olds & 44% of the 18 yr olds ‘ever’ had been forced to have sex. 41% reported victimization by a female perpetrator and 26% reported victimization by both a female and a male perpetrator. Sexual abuse by females was associated with urban residency.
Andersson, Neil, Sergio Paredes-Solís, Deborah Milne, Khalid Omer, Nobantu Marokoane, Ditiro Laetsang, and Anne Cockcroft. 2012 Prevalence and risk factors for forced or coerced sex among school-going youth: national cross-sectional studies in 10 southern African countries in 2003 and 2007.  BMJ open 2, no. 2 (2012).     Child victim, adult perp
In 2007, 21.1% of male students aged 11–16 years reported they had experienced forced or coerced sex. Rates among 16-year-olds 25.4% in males. 11.7% of male students reported they had perpetrated forced sex. Experience of forced sex was strongly associated with perpetration and other risk factors for perpetration were similar to those for victimization. More boys than girls were sexually victimized from ages 11-14, relatively equal between sexes 14 & 15 yrs.
Angelica, J. C. 2002 We are not alone: A guidebook for helping professionals and parents supporting adolescent victims of sexual abuse     Routledge   Child victim, adult perp
Has a single mention of the existence of female perps.
Angelides, S 2008 Sexual Offences Against 'Children' and the question of judicial gender bias  Australian Feminist Studies 23(57), 359-373     Child victim, adult perp
Reviews Karen Ellis case
Apfelberg, B., Sugar, C., & Pfeffer, A. Z. 1944 A psychiatric study of 250 sex offenders.  American Journal of Psychiatry 100, 762-770.     Out-dated, erroneous, etc.
               
Araji, S. 1997 Sexually Aggressive Children: Coming to Understand Them.      Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications   Child/adolescent perp
               
Ashbaughm, Lauren P. & Dewey G. Cornell 2008 Sexual Harassment and Bullying Behaviors in Sixth-Graders   7 (2) 2008 Journal of School Violence   Child victim, adult perp
Sexual harassment is widely viewed as a form of bullying, but has received little attention in studies of middle school students. A survey of 109 6th grade students found that 29% of students reported at least one sexual harassment experience in the past 30 days, with 11% reporting harassment once per week or more. Although boys and girls reported similar rates of harassment, there were important gender differences-boys were more likely than girls to try to ignore sexual harassment, but girls were more likely to tell someone about their experience and to tell the perpetrator to stop. There was high concordance between sexual harassment and bullying for both boys and girls. These findings indicate the need to recognize the role of sexual harassment in bullying in middle school.
Aspelmeier, Jeffery E.; Ann N. Elliott & Christopher H. Smith 2007 Childhood sexual abuse, attachment, and trauma symptoms in college females: The moderating role of attachment Child Abuse & Neglect 31 (5) 2007, 549–566     Child victim, adult perp
               
Atkinson, J. 1995 The Assessment of Female Sex Offenders     Kingston, ON: Correctional Service of Canada   Assessment or treatment related
               
Atkinson, J. L. 1996 Female sex offenders: A literature review. Forum on Corrections Research 8(2), 39-42     Child victim, adult perp
               
Atkinson, Tracey L 2010 Seminar paper presented to the Graduate Faculty     UW Platteville   Legal issues or research issues
               
Austin, James ; Tony Fabelo ; Angela Gunter ; Ken McGinnis 2006 Sexual Violence in the Texas Prison System          Child victim, adult perp
For females, victims and assailants in sex assault allegations are more likely to have violent criminal histories. About 1.34 sexual assaults per 100 inmates in female prison.
Avegno, Jennifer, Trevor J. Mills, and Lisa D. Mills. 2009 Sexual assault victims in the emergency department: analysis by demographic and event characteristics. The Journal of Emergency Medicine 37, no. 3 (2009): 328-334     Child victim, adult perp
1172 pts, 6% were male
Averdijk, Margit, Katrin Müller-Johnson & Manuel Eisner 40848 Sexual victimization of children and adolescents in Switzerland  Final report for the UBS Optimus Foundation       Child victim, adult perp
victims and & 40% of male non-contact victims were offended against in their homes. none of the male victims, reported contact victimization perpetrated by a stepfather, foster father, adoptive father or partner of the victim’s mother. Does not appear to have asked about boys living with stepmothers. More males reported contact sexual victimization by stepmother than by mother, father or stepfather and more non-contact victimization by sister and mother than by stepmother. 2.7% of the non-contact sexual victimization to both males/females was done by the mother. (Non-contact = exposure to child, pornography to child, sexually harassing talk, nude photos of self)
Aylward, M. Christopher, R. & Newell, G. 2002 What about Women Who Commit Sex Offences? Notes from ATSA conference.       Child victim, adult perp
               
Bachmann, K. M., & Bossi, J. 1993 Mother-son incest as a defense against psychosis. British journal of medical psychology 66(3), 239-248     Child victim, adult perp
               
Bachmann, K. M., Moggi, F., & Stirnemann-Lewis, F 1994 Mother-son incest and its long-term consequences: A neglected phenomenon in psychiatric practice  Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 182, 723-725.     Child victim, adult perp
               
Back, Sudie, and Hilary M. Lips. 1998 Child sexual abuse: Victim age, victim gender, and observer gender as factors contributing to attributions of responsibility. Child Abuse & Neglect 22, no. 12 (1998): 1239-1252     Child victim, adult perp
Attribution bias, men in study showed more negative causal attribution biases towards children age 6 and pre-teens age 15.
Bader, S. M., Scalora, M. J., Casady, T. K., & Black, S. 2008 Female sexual abuse and criminal justice intervention: A comparison of child protective service and criminal justice samples  Child Abuse & Neglect, 32(1), 111-119     Child victim, adult perp
Compared female sex offenders cases either reported to CPS vs CJS using a Midwestern state's child abuse registry, law enforcement records, and sex offender registry. The CPS sample consisted of 179 women, and the criminal justice system sample consisted of 57 women. All cases were reported to the agencies between 1994 and 2004. Average victim age was 10, ranging from 1-18 yrs. The majority (74.9%) of the CPS case victims were under age 12, were mostly female (63.7%) and most were relatives of the female offender (97.8%). The majority (73.8%) of the CJS case victims were over 13 years old, were mostly male (62.7%) and were not related to the female perp (63.3%).
Bader, S. M., Welsh, R., & Scalora, M. J. 2010 Recidivism Among Female Child Molesters.  Violence and Victims 25(3), 349-362     Child victim, adult perp
Notes that forensic interviews with child victims and criminal codes are often based on behaviors of male sexual offenders and may miss behaviors by female sexual offenders including forced nudity or de-robing, bathing in front of child or bathing older child, etc. N=57 Nebraska female SOs, looked at their recidivism via legal charges and via child welfare reports. Follow up period was 1-13 years, average 5 years. 66.7% of the women were either single, divorced or widowed. 63.2% had previous non-sexual criminal charges and 17.5% had previously been reported to state Child Protective Services for abuse/neglect of child. Victim ages ranged from 5-18, average of 12.8 yrs. 5.9% of the women abused both boys/girls, 29.4% abused just girls and 64.7% abused just boys. 62% abused non-relatives, 12.3% used physical force to gain compliance, 17.5% used drugs/alcohol as part of grooming. 24.6% had a male co-perp. Recidivism: Per criminal justice records, 10 women (17.5%) were later charged with sex crime and half of those had another subsequent sex crime, By adding info obtained from CPS and police encounters, another 6 women (11% of the original 57) were found to be engaging in problematic sexual behavior with minors that was suspicious enough to come to the attention of CPS. Adding them together, they found 16 women (28.1%) had subsequent charges or at least contact with law enforcement/CPS due to their sexualized behaviors with minors. There were no difference between recidivists and non-recidivists in terms of age, number of previous violence arrests, age of 1st victim, gender of 1st victim, perp-victim relationship, presence of co-offender or use of force. But the recidivists had more property crimes in their history. While 2.4% of the non-recidivists had incest offenses as part of their index charges and none of the criminal recidivists had incest offenses, 16.7% of the CPS recidivists had incest offenses as their index charges. Although this wasn’t statistically significant, it is clinically relevant.
Baier, J. L., Rosenzweig, M. G., & Whipple, E. G. 1991 Patterns of Sexual Behavior, Coercion, and Victimization of University Students.  Journal of College Student Development 32(4), 310-322.     Adult victim, adult perp
Questionnaire data from 340 male and 362 female university students concerning their sexual behavior and coercive sexual experiences and victimization rates were analyzed by gender (GE), class level, and sexual orientation (SO). More than 80% of the Ss reported being sexually active, and many indicated multiple partners. Victimization rates were related to GE and SO: one-eighth of the men, one-fourth of the women, and more than one-third of gay/bisexual Ss indicated that they had engaged in sexual intercourse when they did not want to because they felt coerced to do so. More than half of all acts of sexual coercion and victimization reported by Ss occurred to them before they had entered college
Balsam, K. F., Rothblum, E. D., & Beauchaine, T. P. 2005 Victimization over the life span: a comparison of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and heterosexual siblings Journal of consulting and clinical psychology 73(3), 477     Child victim, adult perp
               
Balsam, K.F., Rothblum, E.D., Beauchaine, T.P. 2005 Vitimization over the life span: a comparison of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and hteteroseual siblings.  Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology 73(3), 477     Legal issues or research issues
N=557 lesbians/gays, 163 bisexuals, 525 bisexuals, 525 heterosexuals (mostly siblins of the non-hetero Ss). 39.8 of lesbians reported being coerced into non-intercourse sexual contacts. 9.3% of hetero males reported being coerced into intercourse. More hetero males reported childhood sexual ause by females than did gay males.  Of heterosexual males who reported hildhood sexual abuse 47.8% reported abuse by a FSO, as did 60% of the bisexual males and 18.8% of the homosexual males who reported childhood sexual abuse.  23.51% of lesians who reported being raped in adulthood indicated that their perp was female, as did 14% of the bisexual women.
Bang, B., Baker, P. L., Carpinteri, A., & Van Hasselt, V. B. 2014 Child Trafficking In Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children 16-Nov Springer International Publishing   Child victim, adult perp
Notes existence of female sexual offenders against children.
Banning, A. 1989 Mother-son incest: Confronting a prejudice  Child Abuse & Neglect 13, 563-570     Child victim, adult perp
               
Banyard VL, Ward, S; Cohn ES; Plante EG; Moorhead C & Walsh W 2007 Unwanted Sexual contact on campus: a comparison of women’s and men’s experiences. Violence and Victims 22 52-70     Child victim, adult perp
current study surveyed 651 male and female undergraduate students about unwanted sexual experiences during 1 academic year. Comparison of men and women revealed expected differences in incidence rates, with women reporting higher rates of unwanted contact. Within the subsample of reported victims, however, there was gender similarity in terms of the context of unwanted sexual experiences. Analyses also revealed the negative consequences of these experiences for both men and women and low rates of disclosure regardless of gender. Across the full sample of students surveyed, there were interesting gender differences in knowledge of campus support services, with women more likely to have attended a prevention program and to have indicated greater knowledge of rape crisis services
Barbara Krahe, Anja Berger, Ine Vanwesenbeeck, Gabriel Bianchi, Joannes Chliaoutkis, Andres A. Fernandez-Fuertes, Antionio Fuertes, Margarida Gaspar de Matos, Eleni Hadjigeorgiou, Birgitt Haller, Sabine Hellemans, Zbigniew Izdebski, Christiana Koutu, Dwayne Meijinckens, Liubove Murauskiene, Maria Papadakak, Lucia Ramiro , Marta Reis, Katrien Symons, Paulina Tomaszewska, Isabel Vicario-Molina & Andrej Zygadlo 2015 Prevalence and correlates of young people's sexual aggression perpetration and victimisation in 10 Europen countries: a multi-level analysys Culture Health & Seuxality: An International Journal of Research Invervention and Care 17 (6), 682-699     Legal issues or research issues
N=3460 young adults (18-27), in 10 European countries. (Austria, Belgium,Cyprus,Greece,Lithunia, the Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, and Spain) Between 10.1 and 55.8% of male respondents reported having experienced at least one incident of sexual victimization since the age of consent.  In two countires, victimization rates were significantly higher for men then for women.  Between 2.6 and 14.8% of female participants reported having engaged in at least one act of sexual perpetration.  Lower gender equality in political power and higher sexual assertiveness in women relative to men were linked to higher male victimization rates.
Barnett. S., Corder, F., & Jehu, D. 1990 Group treatment for women sex offenders against children. Groupwork 3(2), 191-203     Assessment or treatment related
               
Baron, R. S., Burgess, M. L., & Kao, C. F. 1991 Detecting and labeling prejudice: Do female perpetrators go undetected?  Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin 17 (2), 115-123     Legal issues or research issues
Had 196 college students read 12 vignettes describing sexist actions against women, altering whether it was done by another woman or a man. Both male and female students were more likely to rate a vignette as sexist if the actor was male.
Barry Jr, M. J., & Johnson, A. M. 1958 The incest barrier Psychoanalytic quarterly 27(4), 485-500     Child victim, adult perp
Mentions mother-son incest.
Bartels, R. M., & Gannon, T. A. 2011 Understanding the sexual fantasies of sex offenders and their correlates Aggression and Violent Behavior 16(6), 551-561     Child victim, adult perp
               
Basile, K. C., Chen, J., Black, M. C., & Saltzman, L. E. 2007 Prevalence and characteristics of sexual violence victimization among U.S. adults, 2001-2003.  Violence and Victims 22(4), 437-448     Child victim, adult perp
               
Bauminster, R. F., & Twenge, J. M. 2002 Cultural Suppression of female sexuality.  Review of General Psychology 6(2), 166-203     Legal issues or research issues
               
Bauserman, R., & Rind, B. 1997 Psychological correlates of male child and adolescent sexual experiences with adults: A review of the nonclinical literature. Archives of Sexual Behavior 26(2), 105-141     Out-dated, erroneous, etc.
(See Rind et al)
Bear, E. 1993 Inpatient Treatment for Adult Survivors of Sexual Abuse: A Summary of Data From 22 Programs.     Brandon, VT: Safer Society Press   Assessment or treatment related
               
Beatrice, J 1998 Sexual overstimulation as a cause of unstable gender identity in men: A case report. Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association 46(3), 753-776     Child victim, adult perp
Mother would stimulate his rectum, place items in his rectum while he slept & claimed it was to prevent him from defecating in his sleep.
Bebbington,P., Cooper,C, Minot,S, Brugha, T., R. Meltzer & Dennis,M 2009 Suicide attempts, gender, and sexual abuse: data from the 2000 British Psychiatric Morbidity Survey  American Journal of Psychiatry 166(10) -1135-1140     Legal issues or research issues
N=8,580 British participants age 16-74 in 2000 British National Survey of Psychiatric Morbidity, a randomized cross-sectional survey. The population attributable risk fraction for male respondents was 7%.  In theory, the population attributable risk fraction indicates how much the suicide attempt rate would be reduced if no sexual abuse occurred in the population. As such, it is dependent on both the prevalence of the exposure to sexual abuse in the population and the strength of the association of sexual abuse with suicide attempts.  The frequency of reporting suicide attempts during the last year was equal for males and females.  1.6% of the males reported a history of sexual abuse
Beck, A., Harrison, P., and Guerion, P. 2009 Sexual Victimization in Juvenile Facilities Reported by Youth.          Child victim, adult perp
               
Beck,A.J., & Johnson, C. 2012 Sexual victimization reported by former state prisoners. 2008 US Department of Justice.  Office of Justic Programs, Bureau of Justice Statistics.          Legal issues or research issues
Rate of inmate-on-inmate victimization was 3x higher for females (13.7%) than for males (4.2%). 79% of the males reporting sexual victimization by staff reported that the staff member was female and 1.3% of female inmates reporting sexual victimization by staff reported that the staff member was female.
Becker, J. V. 1998 What we know about the characteristics and treatment of adolescents who have committed sexual offenses. Child Maltreatment 3(4), 317-29     Child/adolescent perp
Languages the male/female offenders differently. Has section entitled Characteristics of Male Adolescent Sexual Offenders and section entitled Characteristics of Adolescent Females, leaving off the description of them as sexual offenders.
Becker, J. V., & Hunter, J. A. 1997 Understanding and treating child and adolescent sexual offenders. Advances in Clinical Child Psychology 19, 177-197     Child victim, adult perp
Has 1 page on adolescent female sexual offenders
Becker, J. V., Hall, S., & Stinson, J. D. 2002 Female sexual offenders: Clinical, legal, and policy issues  Journal of Forensic Psychology Practice 1(3), 31-53     Legal issues or research issues
               
Beckett, R. C., & Fisher, D. 1994, November Assessing victim empathy: A new measure. 13th annual conference of the Association for the Treatment of Sexual Abusers, San Francisco.       Child victim, adult perp
Compared 80 British F.S.O.s with 80 British M.S.O.s. Found they had equally poor victim empathy and high offense-supportive distorted beliefs. The solo F.S.O.s had more deficits in these areas than the F.S.O.s who co-offended.
Beech, A. R., Parrett, N., Ward, T., & Fisher, D 2009 Assessing female sexual offenders’ motivations and cognitions: an exploratory study  Psychology, Crime & Law 15, 201-216     Assessment or treatment related
N= 15 British incarcerated female sexual offenders, found they had Uncontrollability, Dangerous Males (rather than dangerous world) and Children as Sexual Being schemas.
Behrendt, N., Buhl, N., & Seidl, S. 2002 The lethal paraphiliac syndrome: Accidental autoerotic deaths in four women and a review of the literature. International Journal of Legal Medicine 116(3), 1437-1596     Adult victim, adult perp
               
Beier, K. M. 2000 Female analogies to perversion.  Journal of Sex and Marital Therapy 26(1), 79-93.     Adult victim, adult perp
               
Beisert, Maria 2013 Agresja czy przemoc seksualna. (Womens Sexual Aggression)    2/2013 • 95-115 NAUKA   Child victim, adult perp
               
Belanger, S. 2008 Characteristics and reactions of sexual victimization of adolescent male sexual abusers by female perpetrators. Unpublished thesis   Smith College School of Social Work   Specifically on male victims
               
Bell, K. 1999 Female offenders of sexual assault.  Journal of Emergency Nursing 25(3), 241-243.     Adult victim, adult perp
               
Belshaw, S. H. 2010 Book Review of Gibson & Vandiver’s Juvenile Sex Offender Youth Violence and Juvenile Justice 8, 86-88.     Child/adolescent perp
               
Bender,L. Blau, A. 1937 Physical and sexual violence experienced by lesbian and heterosexual women Violence Against Women 6(1), 68-79     Adult victim, adult perp
N=136 lesbians, in a convenience sample, responded to anonymous questionnaire; 24% reported sexual victimization by an intimate partner, another 27% reported same by a date. 
Benson, H. 2006 Female sex offenders and neutralization theory.  Unpublished Ph.D. dissertation.   Southern Connecticut State University.   Child victim, adult perp
               
Berdahl, J. L., Magley, V. J., & Waldo, C. R. 1996 The sexual harassment of men?. Psychology of Women Quarterly, 20(4), 527-547     Child victim, adult perp
               
Berendzen, R., & Palmer, L. 1993 Come here: A man overcomes the tragic aftermath of childhood sexual abuse.     Villard Books   Child victim, adult perp
Autobiographical account by an American university president who was sexually abused by his mother from ages 8-11 yrs
Berman,A 2014 The Impact of Female-Perpetrted Sexual Abuse on Male Youths Who subsequently Sexually Offend Doctoral dissertation, Brandeis University       Specifically on male victims
N=176 male juveniles who were victims of incest as youths and later committed sexual offenses. The male victims of female offenders reported the same levels of emotional dysregulation, callousness and sexual preoccupation as did those victimized by males.  Notes that the societal discourse (and that of many mental health professionals) constructs female sexual offenders as inherently insane, engaging in behaviors due to damage from their own victimization or due to male coercion and that the sexual abuse is harmless.  This removes sexual offending from the “spectrum of femininity” and lets us pretend that women are inherently ‘safe”.   This discourse of denial negatively effects how the FSOs view themselves (not really doing anything wrong), allows medical and social welfare professionals to overlook indications of child sexual abuse by women, prevents funding of education or treatment resources for victims and perpetrators, invalidates the victims and disallows any prevention education since children are never told to be wary of women.
Bernard, P. 1886 Des Attentats à la pudeur sur les Petites Filles. Paris: Octave Doin       Out-dated, erroneous, etc.
               
Bierie,D.M., & Davis-Siegel, J.C. 2014 Measurement matters: Comparing old and new definitions of rape in federal statistical reporting Sexual abuse: a journal of research and treatment. 1079063214521470       Legal issues or research issues
FBI and Uniform Crime Reports changed the definition of rape in 2012.  Used to be "the carnal knowledge of a female, forcibly and against her will" and defined carnal knowledge as "the slightest penetration of the sexual organ of a female (vagina) by the sexual organ of the male (penis)".   The old definition precluded any sexual assault of males, any sexual assault by females, any sexual assault of mouth or anus, or using something other than a penis.   The new definition is "the penetration, no matter how slight, of the vagina or anus, with any body-part or object, or oral penetration by a sex organ of another person, without the consent of the victim".   (NOTE:       This study used the National Incident-Based Reporting System to compare the rape reporting before and after the change.  In 2012, there were185,578 reported  rapes that would have been missed using the old definition.  These cases included male victims, younger victims, family victims (non-forcible incest).  5% of the increase was due to the inclusion of male victims of female and/or male offenders. 
Black, K. A., & Gold, D. J. 2003 Men's and women's reactions to hypothetical sexual advances: The role of initiator socioeconomic status and level of coercion. Sex Roles 49(3-4), 173-178     Child victim, adult perp
               
Black, MC., Basile,K.C., Breiding, MJ, Smith S.G., Walters, M.L, Merrick, M.T., Chen,J. & Stevens, M.R. 2011 The National Intimate Parnter and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS): 2010 Summary Report  Atlanta, GA: National enter for Inquiry Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention       Legal issues or research issues
Rate of sexual coercion against males by females was 38.6%. 22% of men experienced other forms of sexual victimization perpetrated by females, including being made to penetrate, coerced sexual intercourse, and unwanted sexual contact
Blanchette, K, & Taylor, K.N. 2010 A review of treatment initiatives for female sexual offenders Female Sexual Offenders: Theory, Assessment, and Treatment 119-141     Assessment or treatment related
 
Blosnich John R & Robert M. Bossarte 2009 Comparisons of Intimate Partner Violence Among Partners in Same-Sex and Opposite-Sex Relationships in the United States  American Journal of Public Health 2009 99 (12) 2182-2184     Adult victim, adult perp
Used 2005-2007 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance system data to examine IPV. 89% of the female respondents reported physical victimization by females, 51% reported sexual victimization by females; 97% of the males reported physical victimization by females, 12% reported sexual victimization by females. The eval asked questions regarding being groped, fondled, watched, photographed, oral/anal/vaginal intercourse, attempted,
Blues, A., Moffatt, C., & Telford, P. 1999 Work with adolescent females who sexually abuse: Similarities and differences.  Children and Young People Who Sexually Abuse Others: Challenges and Responses ‘168-182 London: Routledge M. Erooga & H. C. Masson Child/adolescent perp
               
Boije, Gerthy 2013 Mjuk, omsorgsfull och sexualförbrytare:-En studie om kvinnor dömda för sexualbrott."(Soft, caring and sex offenders-A study of women offenders)  Dissertation       Child victim, adult perp
               
Bolton, F. G., Morris, L. A., & MacEachron, A. E. 1989 Males at Risk: The Other Side of Sexual Abuse      Newbury Park, CA: Sage   Specifically on male victims
               
Bonthuys, Elsje 2008 Putting Gender into the Definition of Rape or Taking it Out? Feminist Legal Studies 2008 16 (2) 249-260     Legal issues or research issues
The main issue in the Masiya judgment was whether the current South African definition of rape—namely non-consensual penetration of a vagina by a penis—should be extended to include anal penetration of both female and male victims. The majority of the Constitutional Court held that anal penetration of female victims should constitute rape, but declined to offer similar protection to male victims. This note argues that this judgment reverts to and reinforces patriarchal stereotypes and dichotomies and that it misunderstands, in a profound way, central concepts such as sex and gender and the gendered nature of rape.
Bordon, T. A., & LaTerz, J. D. 1993 Mother/daughter incest and ritual abuse: The ultimate taboos. Treating Abuse Today 3(4), 5-8.     Child victim, adult perp
               
Bornstein,B.H., Kaplan, D.L. & Perry, A.R. 2007 Child abuse in the eyes of the beholder. Lay perceptions of child seual and physial abuse Child abuse & neglect 31(4) 375-391     Child victim, adult perp
N=199, read 24 vignettes of abuse of child by adult, with victim's gender, perp's gender, relationship (parent/babysitter) and type of abuse (physical/sexual) altered. Subjects rated trauma, victim believability, etc.   Sexual abuse by a babysitter was seen as less traumatic than that by a parent.  Sexual abuse was seen as less traumatic if it was by a female perp and a male victim, was seen as more severe if perpetrated by a male. The abuse was seen as less likely to re-occur if it was done by a female perp.  Victims of female perps were judged as less 'believable' than victims of male perps. 
Boroughs, D. S. 2004 Female sexual abusers of children.  Journal of Children and Youth Services Review 26(5), 481-487     Child victim, adult perp
               
Bouffard, J.A. Bouffard, L.A., & Miller, H.A. 2015 Examining the Correlates of Women's Use of Sexual Coercion Proposing an Explanatory Model Journal of interpersonal violence, 0886260515575609       Legal issues or research issues
N=582 college undergrad females; the predictors of sexual aggression for males were also predictive of women's sexual aggression.
Bourke,A., Doherty, S., McBride,O., Morgan,K., McGee,H. 2013 Female Perpetrators of child sexual abuse: characteristics of the offender and victim. Psychology, Crime & Law pages 01-12     Child victim, adult perp
Looked at prevalence rate of sexual abuse of children by women in Ireland using nationally representative survey (N=3,120).  6% of all victims of child sexual abuse in this sample were victimized by a solo female perp (about 1.5% of Irish adult population). Female perps in this study were younger than the male perps, focused more on male victims and victims age 9-17 years, were more likely to know their victims and have been in a position of authority
Brayford, Jo. 2012 Female sexual offending: An impermissible crime Crime Prevention & Community Safety 14, no. 3 (2012): 212-224.     Child victim, adult perp
This article explores female child sex offending and reveals a void in the theory and policy arena. It highlights the need for further thinking about violence committed by women in the private domain. The implicit denial of women's potential for sexual aggression within criminology and community safety may ultimately contribute to the under-recognition of the problem in academic, policy and practice and official sources.
Brayford, Jo.,, Cowe.F. & Deering, J. 2012 Sex Offenders: Punish, Help, Change or Control? Theory, Polic and Practice Explored   Routledge   Assessment or treatment related
Has chapter on female sexual offenders
Breiding, MJ, Smith, SG. Basile, KC, Walters, ML Chen,J & Merrick, MT 2011 Center for Disease Control Prevalence and Characteristis of Sexual Violence, Stalking and Intimate Partner iolence Victimization  Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 2014;63     Specifically on male victims
Has data collected in 2011 on domestic & sexual violence in USA.  Although the CDC defines sexual violence as a sexual act perpetrated against someone's will, and fines a sexual act the penetration of a vagina/anus by a penis/object/finger, they still seem to be ignoring events where a male is forcibly made to penetrate a vagina, which clearly meets their definition.   Comparing the 2010 data (4.8%) to the 2011 data (6.7%) for the last 12 months, there has been an increase in males reporting rape/being forced to penetrate.   Comparing lifetime findings, reports by Male victims of female perps rose from 6.7% in 2010 to 20.7% in 2011, while male victims of male perps went down from 93.3% to 79.3%.  Men reporting being forced to penetrate a female rose from 79.2% to 82.6%. 
Briere J. & Elliott D.M. 2003 Prevalence and psychological sequelae of self-reported childhood physical and sexual abuse in a general population sample of men and women. csa cpa.pdf Child Abuse & Neglect 27, 1205-1222     Child victim, adult perp
               
Briere, J., Evans, D., Runtz, M., & Wall, T. 1988 Symptomatology in men who were molested as children: A comparison study  American Journal of Orthopsychiatry 58(3), 457-461     Specifically on male victims
               
Briggs, F., & Hawkins, R. M. 1996 A comparison of the childhood experiences of convicted male child molesters and men who were sexually abused in childhood and claimed to be non-offenders. Child abuse & neglect 20(3), 221-233     Child victim, adult perp
Compared 84 incarcerated child molesters and 95 non-offender comparison subjects were interviewed. All of the non-offenders and 93% of the child molesters had been sexually abused in childhood. The prisoners were more socially disadvantaged as children and had received more verbal and physical abuse. The prisoners were more accepting of their abuse in the sense of not understanding or accepting that it was aberrant behavior but rather thinking that it was a commonplace, inevitable, and consequently a normal part of childhood. Liking some aspect of the initial abuse also differentiated prisoners from the non-offenders. Prisoners were abused by a larger number of people than were non-offenders. Prisoners did not use the fact of their own abuse as an excuse for their own offenses. Abuse by a female was more common in the prisoner group. The men who were least damaged by abuse were those abused by strangers in “one-off” offenses, which they recognized as wrong and from which they escaped without accepting responsibility for the adults behavior
Brinton, C. 2000 A Comparison of Sexual Arousal Patterns of Female Sex Offenders and Non-offenders.  Unpublished Ph.D. dissertation   San Francisco, CA: Institute for the Advanced Study of Human Sexuality.   Assessment or treatment related
               
Broadhurst,R, & Loh, N. 2003 The probabilities of sex offender re-arrest Criminal Behaviour and Mental Health 13(2), 121-139     Legal issues or research issues
.  N=43 FSO, with 0 re-arrests for sexual offenses, 4 had re-arrest for violent offences within follow up time period (average 5.7 years).  Offenses included sex crimes against children and adolescents, including 5 cases of aggravated sexual assault and one of sodomy. 
Brodie, F. 1992 When the Other Woman Is His Mother: Book One/Boys As Incest Victims and Male Multiple Personality Disorder/for Partners and Professionals.      Tacoma, WA: Winged Eagle Press.   Specifically on male victims
               
Broussard, S. D., & Wagner, W. G. 1988 Child sexual abuse: Who is to blame? Child Abuse & Neglect 12(4), 563-569     Child victim, adult perp
Used a vignette of child sexual abuse of a 15 yr old N-360 college students, found males subjects confused encouragement with consent, seem to assume that males of any age should always acquiesce to sex with a female despite being under the age of consent.
Broussard, S., Wagner, W. G., & Kazelskis, R. 1991 Undergraduate students' perceptions of child sexual abuse: The impact of victim sex, perpetrator sex, respondent sex, and victim response.  Journal of Family Violence 6(3), 267-278     Child victim, adult perp
               
Brousseau Melanie M, Martine Hébert & Sophie Bergeron 2012 Sexual Coercion within Mixed-Sex Couples: The Roles of Sexual Motives, Revictimization, and Reperpetration Journal of Sex Research 49 (6) 2012     Adult victim, adult perp
Research suggests that a history of childhood sexual abuse, and previous experiences of sexual coercion, may predict sexual coercion victimization and perpetration. More recently, sexual motivation has been found to correlate with both consensual and non-consensual sexual activity. However, sexual motivation has not been examined in association with previous experiences of abuse and sexual coercion. The aim of this study was to investigate childhood sexual abuse, previous sexual coercion experiences, and sexual motives of both partners as possible risk factors for current sexual coercion victimization and perpetration within a sample of 209 mixed-sex couples. This study examined whether power, stress relief, partner pressure, and imposition motives contributed unique variance to the prediction of sexual coercion beyond that accounted for by past childhood sexual abuse and sexual coercion events. Using hierarchical logistic regressions, four predictive models were examined for both male and female sexual coercion perpetration and victimization. Results show that childhood sexual abuse was only a significant predictor of female sexual coercion perpetration, whereas male sexual coercion victimization and perpetration were predicted by sexual coercion victimization and perpetration in previous relationships. Power motives were also significant predictors of sexual coercion perpetration, and imposition was a significant predictor of sexual coercion victimization for both genders
Brow, M.E., Knopp, F.H., & Lackey, L.B. 1987 Female Sexual Abusers: A Summary of Data from 44 Treatment Providers     Orwell: Safer Society Press   Child victim, adult perp
               
Brow,M.E., Knopp, F.H. & Lackey,L.B. 1987 Female Sexual Abusers: A summary of Data from 44 Treatment Providers     Orwell Safer Society Press   Legal issues or research issues
 
Brown, Anthony Warren Alexander 2012 Gendered Media: A Study of how Newspapers Frame Educators Involved in Statutory Rape According to the Gender of the Adult. PhD diss   California State University, Sacramento   Legal issues or research issues
               
Brown, M.E., Drucker, L.A. Hull, L.A., & Panesis, S.K. 1984 Women Who Rape     Boston: Massachusetts Trial Court, 1-10. [Cited in Mathews, Matthews, & Speltz, 1990; and Syed & Williams, 1996]   Child victim, adult perp
               
Buchanan, Kim S. 41153 Engendering Rape  University of Southern California Legal Studies Working Paper Serie Working Paper 93     Child victim, adult perp
This Article highlights a systematic bias in the academic, correctional, and human rights discourse that constitutes the basis for prison rape policy reform. This discourse focuses almost exclusively on sexual abuse perpetrated by men: sexual abuse of male prisoners by fellow inmates, and sexual abuse of women prisoners by male staff. But since 2007, survey and correctional data have indicated that the main perpetrators of prison sexual abuse seem to be women. In men’s facilities, inmates report much more sexual victimization by female staff than by male inmates; in women’s facilities, inmates report much higher rates of sexual abuse by fellow inmates than by male or female staff. These findings contravene conventional gender expectations, and are barely acknowledged in contemporary prison rape discourse, leading to policy decisions that are too sanguine about the likelihood of female-perpetrated sexual victimization. The selective blindness of prison rape discourse to counter-stereotypical forms of abuse illuminates a pattern of reasoning I describe as “stereotype reconciliation,” an unintentional interpretive trend by which surprising, counter-stereotypical facts are reconciled with conventional gender expectations. The authors of prison rape discourse tend to ignore these counter-stereotypical facts or to invoke alternative stereotypes, such as heterosexist notions of romance or racialized rape tropes, in ways that tend to rationalize their neglect of counter-stereotypical forms of abuse and reconcile those abuses with conventional expectations of masculine domination and feminine submission
Budd,K.M., Bierie,D.M, Williams,K 2015 Deconstructing Incidents of Female Perpetrated Sex Crimes Comparing Female Sexual Offender Groupings Sexual abuse: a journal of research and treatment. 107906321559436       Adult victim, adult perp
Reviewed National Incident Based Reporting System data 1992-2012 on FSOs, divided up as Solos (29,238 or 62% of sample), FSO/MSO co-ed pairs (11,000 or 24% of sample), FSO groups (2669 or 6% of sample) and multi-perp groups with FSOs & MSOs (4268 or 9% of sample).  The sexual offenses included forcible rape, forcible sodomy, sexual assault with an object, forcible fondling, non-forcible incest and non-forcible statutory rape (pimping was Not included).  They found that co-ed pairs were more likely to have a female victim than was a solo FSO, that co-ed pairs were more likely to have a dependent child for a victim than was a solo FSO.  Multi-perp groups were more likely to have a stranger victim and were more likely to cause both minor and major injuries to a victim.  Multi-perp groups were also more likely to be involved in computer crimes (non-contact, child porn) than solo FSOs.  FSO groups were more likely to offend within a jail setting than other types of FSO offenders.  
Bullock CM, Beckson M 2011 Male victims of sexual assault: phenomenology, psychology, physiology Journal American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law 2011;39(2):197-205     Child victim, adult perp
Myths, stereotypes, and unfounded beliefs about male sexuality, in particular male homosexuality, are widespread in legal and medical communities, as well as among agencies providing services to sexual assault victims. These include perceptions that men in non-institutionalized settings are rarely sexually assaulted, that male victims are responsible for their assaults, that male sexual assault victims are less traumatized by the experience than their female counterparts, and that ejaculation is an indicator of a positive erotic experience. As a result of the prevalence of such beliefs, there is an underreporting of sexual assaults by male victims; a lack of appropriate services for male victims; and, effectively, no legal redress for male sexual assault victims. By comparison, male sexual assault victims have fewer resources and greater stigma than do female sexual assault victims. Many male victims, either because of physiological effects of anal rape or direct stimulation by their assailants, have an erection, ejaculate, or both during the assault. This is incorrectly understood by assailant, victim, the justice system, and the medical community as signifying consent by the victim. Studies of male sexual physiology suggest that involuntary erections or ejaculations can occur in the context of nonconsensual, receptive anal sex. Erections and ejaculations are only partially under voluntary control and are known to occur during times of extreme duress in the absence of sexual pleasure. Particularly within the criminal justice system, this misconception, in addition to other unfounded beliefs, has made the courts unwilling to provide legal remedy to male victims of sexual assault, especially when the victim experienced an erection or an ejaculation during the assault. Attorneys and forensic psychiatrists must be better informed about the physiology of these phenomena to formulate evidence-based opinions.
Bumby, K. M., Halstenson Bumby, N., Burghess, A. W., & Hartman, C. R. 1996 From Victims to Victimizers: Sexually Aggressive Post-Traumatic Responses of Sexually Abused Adolescent Females.         Child/adolescent perp
cannot substantiate the existence of this study but found it cited elsewhere
Bumby, K., & Halstenson Bumby, N. 1997 Adolescent female sex offenders.  The Sex Offender: New Insights, Treatment Innovations and Legal Developments Vol. II, pp. 10-1 10-16 Kingston, NJ: Civic Research Institute, Inc. B. Schwartz, & H. Cellini Child/adolescent perp
The adolescent female sex offenders in this study averaged 2 victims each,
Bumby, N. H., & Bumby, K. M. 2004 Bridging the gender gap: Addressing juvenile females who commit sexual offences.  The handbook of clinical intervention with young people who sexually abuse ‘369–381 New York, NY: Brunner-Routledge G. O’Reilly, W. L. Marshall, A. Carr, & R. C. Beckett Child/adolescent perp
               
Bunting, L. 2005 Females who sexually offend against children: Responses of the child protection and criminal justice systems.[67] NSPCC Policy Practice Research Series   London: NSPCC   Legal issues or research issues
               
Bunting, L. 2007 Dealing with a Problem That Doesn't Exist?: Professional Responses to Female Perpetrated Child Sexual Abuse.  Child Abuse Review 16(4), 252-267     Child victim, adult perp
               
Bureau of Justic Statistics   Special Report, Sexual Victimization in Juvenile Facilities Reported by Youth 2008-2009 January 2010 NCJ 228416       Child victim, adult perp
26,550 youths, 10.3% reported sexual victimization (contact) with staff, 95% of the staff perpetrators were female
Burgess A., Hartman C., McCausland M., & Powers P 1984 Response patterns in children and adolescents exploited through sex rings and pornography.  American Journal of Psychiatry 14, 656-662     Child victim, adult perp
               
Burgess, A. W., Hartman, C. R., & McCormack, A. 1987 Abused to abuser: Antecedents of socially deviant behaviors.  The American Journal of Psychiatry 144, 1431-1436     Child victim, adult perp
               
Burket, L. E. 1985 Guilt and Moral Judgment in the Juvenile Female Sex Offender: A Comprehensive Literature Review. Unpublished MA thesis   Pittsburgh, PA: University of Pittsburgh   Child/adolescent perp
               
Burt, Darren L., and Lesley R. DeMello 2003 Attribution of rape blame as a function of victim gender and sexuality, and perceived similarity to the victim Journal of Homosexuality 43, no. 2 (2003): 39-57     Legal issues or research issues
               
Busby, D. M., & Compton, S. V. 1997 Patterns of sexual coercion in adult heterosexual relationships: An exploration of male victimization  Family Process 36(1), 81-94     Adult victim, adult perp
               
Butte, Michelle 2009 The knowledge and attitudes of mental health professionals in their practice with male victims of sexual abuse Thesis (M.S.W., Social Work)   California State University, Sacramento   Assessment or treatment related
               
Byard, R. W., Hucker, S. J., & Hazelwood, R. R. 1993 Fatal and near-fatal autoerotic asphyxial episodes in women: Characteristic features based on a review of nine cases.  American Journal of Forensic Medicine and Pathology 14(1), 70-3     Adult victim, adult perp
               
Byers, E. Sandra & Shannon A. Glenn 2012 Gender Differences in Cognitive and Affective Responses to Sexual Coercion Journal of Interpersonal Violence 2012 27 (5) 827-845     Child victim, adult perp
The women were more upset than were the men at the time of the incident. Contrary to predictions, the men and women did not differ in the extent to which they attributed blame to themselves or the strength of their internal attributions, guilt, or shame. Both the men and women attributed more blame to the coercer than to themselves; however, the women attributed more blame to the coercer than did the men. The women reported more trauma symptoms than the men did which was related to the finding that more women than men had experienced sexual coercion involving physical force. These results are discussed in terms of the similarities and differences between men’s and women’s cognitive and affective responses to sexual coercion
Byers, S. E. 1996 How well does the traditional sexual script explain sexual coercion? Review of a program of research  Journal of Psychology & Human Sexuality 8(1-2), 7-25     Adult victim, adult perp
               
Byers, S. E. 1998 Similar but different: Men’s and women’s experiences of sexual coercion  Sexually Aggressive Women: Current Perspectives and Controversies ‘144-168 New York: The Guilford Press. P. B. Anderson & C. Struckman-Johnson Adult victim, adult perp
               
Bynum, Malecia & Graham Tony E 41002 Are Judicial Systems Sexist Regarding Teacher Sex Offense Sentencing Guidelines?          Legal issues or research issues
Analyzed 50 cases male and female teacher sex offense cases and sentencing guidelines for states. Female teachers tend to receive lesser sentences than males in cases where it is of the same stature. Males are more likely to get extensive jail time while females receive lesser sentences and fines
Caceres,C.F.  2005 Assessing young people's non-consentual sexual experiences; lessons from Peru Sex without consent.  Young people in developing countries (127-138) London. Zed Books   Specifically on male victims
20% of men (16-30yrs) reported non-consensual sex by female perp at least once during lifetime
Caffaro, John V., and Allison Conn-Caffaro 2005 Treating sibling abuse families Aggression and Violent Behavior 10, no. 5 (2005): 604-623     Child/adolescent perp
Sister-brother incest was 3rd largest group (10%), Sister-sister incest was least common (7%). 15% of the women reported being victims of Sister-sister physical assault and 10% of men reported a history of Sister-brother physical assault.
Cain,C.M., Sample,L.L., & Anderson, A.L. 2015 Public Opinion of the Application of Sex Offender Notification Laws to Female Sex Offenders. Why It is Important to Examine Criminal Justice Policy Review 0887403415572253 pages 01-21     Legal issues or research issues
Discusses S.O. notification laws (sex offender registries) and whether or not those on the registries are a danger to society.  Used 2012 data from Nebraska. 
Cameron, P., Coburn Jr., W., Larson, H., & Proctor, K. 1986 Child Molestation and Homosexuality Psychological Reports 58(1), 327-337     Child victim, adult perp
               
Campbell, A. 1994 Men, women and aggression New York: Basic Books.       Child victim, adult perp
Says that to many men, “female aggression remains shrouded in mystery-capricious, irrational, arbitrary”, that men’s views of aggression fail to account for women’s aggression and that women who are violent must either be mentally ill or acting like men.
Capers, Bennett 2011 Real rape too.  California Law Review 99 (2011): 1259     Specifically on male victims
               
Carlson, Amber 2013 Abnormal Sexual Assault Situations and Its Influence on Rape Myth Acceptance  unpublished honors thesis   University of New Hampshire   Child victim, adult perp
The crime of rape, unwanted sexual contact, is a heavily researched topic in the sociological field. The majority of research, however, has revolved around incidences of stranger rape and the typical gender combination of male offender and female victim. The updated Illinois Rape Myth Acceptance Scale was created to measure the level of participants agree with the typical rape myths of: she asked for it, he didn’t mean to, it wasn’t really rape, and she lied. This research study was designed to test the influence of gender in rape situations and how this affects the acceptance of rape myths. In addition, this acceptance of rape myths was compared with the likeliness to report stranger rape, acquaintance rape, and dating rape; along with the likeliness of having a consistent definition with the official one. Four separate surveys were distributed to 312 participants. Survey A contained situations of male-on female rape, survey B had female-on-male, survey C had female-on-female, and survey D had male-on-male rapes. 176 individuals took part in this survey. Each survey was analyzed for rape myth acceptance and likeliness to report each rape scenario. The overall results revealed that the gender of the victim and offender did not impact individual’s acceptance of rape myths. Limitations of the study and future research implications are discussed. Rape myths and rape scripts conceptualize rape as occurring between a female victim and a male offender. This has lead to the stereotypical beliefs that men cannot be victims of rape and females are incapable of being offenders of rape (Clark and Stermac 2011). This, however, is not the case. There are four combinations of actors that are possible in a single perpetration of rape: the rape by a man of a woman, the rape by a woman of another woman, the rape by a woman of a man, and the rape by a man of another man. Research has focused around the prevalence of a rape by a man of woman and has been supported by rape myths secured in place by stereotypical beliefs. These stereotypical beliefs, discussed above, ascertain that men cannot be victims of rape due to their strength, women do not have the strength to force a man to have non-consensual sexual intercourse, and men always enjoy sex (Sivakumaran 2005). Given the prevalence of homophobia in society, there is a certain taboo surrounding the discussion of same-sex rape and a silence surrounding the three other types of rape. This focus on the male-female patter should not, however, discount the severity of sexual assault by males against other males, which as we shall see, are unjustifiably downplayed, or only examined in the context of prison settings. Nor should an emphasis on this pattern minimize the even rarer occurrence between sexual assaults of males by females or of females by other females. Female-on-Male Rape: This occurrence of rape has been less studied when compared to other situations of rape, possibly due to its heterosexual nature. Regardless, male victims of sexual abuse by females often face social, political, and legal double standards as a result of the male stereotypes found in our society. Similar to male-on-male victims, female-on-male victims are likely to experience sexual problems post-assault as well. However the impact in these situations can lead to greater victim blaming and questioning surrounding whether the incidence was truly a rape due to the “normality” of the gendered sexual situation (Coxell and King 2010). Based upon the heterosexual normality of sex between a man and woman, these rape occurrences have been studied less and are less understood; possibly due to the lack of reporting. It is therefore, a goal of this current research study to gain a further understanding of how society defines these occurrences and the extent to which rape myth acceptance has a role in these definitions. Female-on-Female Rape Female-on-female rape is often labeled as “lesbian rape,” although the sexual orientation of one or both persons involved may or may not actually be lesbian. Non-consensual sexual intercourse can be stimulated by forced stimulation or forced penetration through the use of sexual toys or other foreign objects. Limited research has been conducted in this area of topic. However, in 2009 Lori B. Girshick wrote a book entitled, “Woman-to-Woman Sexual Violence: Does She Call It Rape?” In this book she discusses the extent to which our legal system is not equipped to handle same-sex assaults, partly has a result of the homophobic myths surrounding these types of assaults. Grishick (2009) also found that the lesbian community has silenced those affected by female-on-female rape in an attempt to reduce the societal homophobia and negative connotations surrounding the lesbian community. Nonetheless, similar to the other “abnormal” types of rapes, female-on-female rape is an important area to study to further understand the perceptions and definitions surrounding those situations that deviate from the traditional male-on female rape. It is important to understand how society views these rapes to decrease the prevalence of the myths and stereotypes and increase the social and legal support available to all rape victims. 2) It is hypothesized that participants will hold stronger rape myth acceptance in cases of same-sex rape (Coxell and Gordon 1999, Coxell and King 2010, and Sivakumaran 2005. means of rape myth acceptance for males vs. females in situations of female-on-male rape. Males had a higher rape myth acceptance score than females, a 44.2 when compared with a 38.9, but this relationship was not significant at the 90% confidence interval. Male were, again, hypothesized to hold a higher rape myth acceptance score in situation of female-on-female rape than females. It was found that they had higher rape myth acceptance than females however this relationship was not significant.
Carlson, B. E., Maciol, K. & Schneider, J. 2006 Sibling Incest: Reports from Forty-One Survivors  Journal of Child Sexual Abuse 15(4), 19-34     Child/adolescent perp
               
Carlson,A. 2013 Abnormal Sexual Assault Sitatuions and Its Influence on Rape Myth Acceptance  unpublished honors thesis Univeristy of New Hampshire       Legal issues or research issues
Used 4 variations of survey (male rape of female; female rape of male; female rape of female; male rape of male). Noted that rape myth acceptance wasn't highly related to gender of victim/offender. 
Carlson,B.E., Maciol,K,& Schneider,J 2006 Sibling Incest: Reports from Forty-One Survivors Journal of child sexual ause 15(4), 19-34     Child victim, adult perp
 
Carpentier,M.Y,, Silovsky, J.F., & Chaffin, M 2006 Randomized trial of treatment for children with sexual behavior problmes: Ten-year follow-up Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology 74(3), 482     Assessment or treatment related
N=77 minor age female sexual offenders.  Rsults of 2 treatment modalitites not seperated by sex of offending child.  CBT had less recidivism (any arrest) than Play Therapy.
Carson, W. 2006 Women Who Molest Children: A Study of 18 Convicted Offenders  Prosecutor 40(3), 26-41     Child victim, adult perp
               
Carvalho,J., & Nobre,P.J. 2015 Psychosexual characteristics of women reporting sexual aggression against men Journal of interpersonal violence, 0886260515579504       Specifically on male victims
N=260 female college students, used online survey, 35.8% reported having committed some form of sexual aggression against men: 46.2% by sexual coercion, 34.1% engaged in sexual abuse, and 19.8% used physical force.  Sexually aggressive women self-reported more socio-sexuality (willingness to have sex outside of a relationship), fantasies of dominance and submission and sexual compulsivity.
Cavanagh, Sheila L. 2004 Upsetting desires in the classroom: School sex scandals and the pedagogy of the femme fatale. Psychoanalysis, Culture & Society 9, no. 3 (2004): 315-332     Child victim, adult perp
This paper examines the female teacher sex scandal involving former Canadian teacher Annie Markson and false allegations that she indecently assaulted an underage boy student. Using feminist psychoanalytic theory I argue that the media coverage of the story had a voyeuristic quality to it that can best be understood by interpreting the role of the counter-transference in education. The news story also reveals a psychic anxiety about normative masculine identity development, heterosexual bifurcations of gender, and female teacher sexuality.
Cecil, Dawn K. 2007 Looking Beyond Caged Heat Media Images of Women in Prison Feminist Criminology October 2007 vol. 2 no. 4 304-326     Child victim, adult perp
Female prisoners are an invisible correctional population; thus, media images are critical in shaping people's understanding of this social issue. Although research has examined how Hollywood depicts female prisoners, it has not delved into images found in reality-based programs. This study examined documentaries, televised news magazines, and talk shows to determine how these programs portray this incarcerated population and to identify how the issue is framed. Findings indicate that although some of the critical issues facing incarcerated women are presented, these programs still highlight factors that excite viewers, including violence and sex, thereby creating a sensationalized and damaging image of women behind bars. From a total 4,712 publications, identified using keywords searches on Medline, EMBASE, and PsycInfo (1984 to December 2011), we selected 61 papers using methodological criteria of evidence-based medicine. Our literature review studied 6,293 cases of female sex offenders in these 611 publications. Results: Our review, conducted on a large population covering 61 of the most recent acceptable evidence-based studies, enables us to confirm three already-known suppositions: (1) female sex offenders have themselves often been victims not only of sex abuse (49.1%), but perhaps more importantly, of other types of family violence and instability (55.4%); (2) 51.2% suffer from psychiatric disorders, depression and/or mental retardation; (3) they are more likely to attack their own children or other close relatives before looking for victims outside of their family unit (63.9%). However, there are other generally held beliefs that do not seem to be based on fact and should certainly be reviewed, in particular concerning the belief that female sex offenders are not dangerous: 1) alcohol and drug abuse appeared in our series as less significant (29.1%) than previously described in older research, and seemed to confirm the results found with more rigourous data and larger scope studies described in the more recent literature; 2) female sex offenders are more likely to choose male victims (60%) over female victims (40%); 13.3% of them do not have any sexual preference; 3) contrary to popular belief, more female sex offenders commit their first crime alone than with an accomplice (66.7% of them act alone); 4) violence and coercion is far from absent when a female commits a sex offense (45.8% of cases); 5) although repeat sex offenses are rare, in a large number of cases (40.3%), female sex offenders have already been charged with other criminal offenses, or have repeat offenses in non-sexual criminal acts.
Center for Sex Offender Management 2007 Female Sex Offenders          Legal issues or research issues
 
Chan, H. C. O., & Frei, A. 2013 Female Sexual Homicide Offenders An Examination of an Underresearched Offender Population Homicide Studies 17(1), 96-118     Child victim, adult perp
Using FBI’s Supplemental Homicide Report (SHR) data (1976-2007), 204 female sexual homicide offender cases (27 juveniles and 177 adult offenders) were examined. Female sexual murderers were more likely to target victims from the opposite gender, 75% of their victims were males, 78% were adults, 81% were in a relationship with the victim. Predominantly used firearms (compensate for strength disparity with victim).
Chan, H. C. O., Frei, A. M., & Myers, W. C. 2013 Female sexual homicide offenders: An analysis of the offender racial profiles in offending process. Forensic Science International 233(1), 265-272.     Child victim, adult perp
Using FBI Supplemental Homicide Reports data (1976–2007), 105 White and 94 Black female SHOs were examined. Most female SHOs, regardless of race, killed victims of the opposite gender, most frequently targeted by female SHOs of both races were known victims (e.g., friends, acquaintances) who were not intimate partners or family members. Firearms were the most common weapons used by female SHOs.
Chan, H.C.O., & Frei,A 2013 Female Sexual Homicide Offenders An Examination of an Under researched Offender Population Homicide Studies 17(1), 96-118     Legal issues or research issues
Using FBI's Supplemental Homicide Report (SHR) data (1976-2007), 204 female sexual homicide offender cases (27 juveniles and 177 adult offenders) were examined.  Female sexual murderers were more likely to target victims from the opposite gender, 75% of their victims were males, 78% were adults, 81% were in a relationship with the victim. Predominantly used firearms (compensate for strength disparity with victim). 
Chapleau, KM, Oswald DL & Russell RL 2008 Male rape myths: the role of gender, violence and sexism  Journal of Interpersonal Violence 23 (5) 600-612     Specifically on male victims
N=423 college students, given measures of believes about rape, interpersonal violence. Men were less accepting of the myth that a man would not be upset after a sexual accept and they were least accepting of the idea that men do not get raped. Support for rape myths didn’t vary depending on the sex of the victim.
Chasnoff, I. J., Burns. W. J., Schnoll, S. H., Burns, K., Chisum, G., & Kyle-Spore, L. 1986 Maternal-neonatal incest American Journal of Orthopsychiatry 56(4), 577-580     Child victim, adult perp
Small sample size
Chen, L.P., Murad, M.H., Paras, M.L., Colbenson, K.M., Sattler, A.L., Goranson,E.N. & Zirakzadeh A 2010 Sexual abuse and lifetime diagnosis of psychiatric disorders; systematic review and meta-analysis.  Mayo Clinic Proceedings 85 (7), 618-629     Legal issues or research issues
 
Chibnall, John T.; Ann Wolf & Paul N. Duckro 1998 A National Survey of the Sexual Trauma Experiences of Catholic Nuns  Review of Religious Research 40 (2) 142-167 1998     Child victim, adult perp
N=1,164 nuns. Mean age 62. Nuns (3.2%) accounted for nearly 10% of the abusers (prevalence of 1.6%). Prevalence of Sexual exploitation during religious life by other females was 3.4%. The most common roles for nun perpetrators were mentor, formation director, religious superior, and teacher. Those exploited as an adult by another female were significantly less likely to ever have told another person (61%) than those who were exploited by a male (81%). Of the 1,164 nuns, there were 599 incidents of sexual abuse, exploitation or sexual harassment reported. Most common perps were lay persons, Second Most Common Perp were Nuns (29.9%), followed by clergymen (21.2%). Looking just at adult sexual exploitation and sexual harassment, Nuns accounted for 44.9% of incidents, more than clergymen or lay persons.
Chideckel, M. 1935 Female Sex Perversion     Oxford: Eugenics Publishing Co.   Out-dated, erroneous, etc.
               
Chiotti, Jennifer Marie. 2009 The “illusive” female sex offender: A quantitative content analysis of media exposure.  PhD diss   Washington State University   Child victim, adult perp
For this study, mass media outlets such as television, newspaper, and magazine articles will be used to gain a convenient sampling of exposure and documentation of female sex offending since 1994. Found 819 cases of female perpetrated sex crime in the news, 109 charged with non-rape sex crime, 451 charged with rape, 69 charged with kidnapping and/or torture, 190 charged with sexual murder. 813 acted solo. Media called women Caregiver in 391 cases but 0 male cases, In Love with victim in 87 female cases but only 1 male case. Males were called Evil, Predatory, Perpetrator.
Chivers, M.L., Seto,M.C., Lalumiere,M.L, Laan E., % Grimbos, T 2010 Agreement of self-reported and genital measures of sexual arousal I men and women.  A meta-analysis Archives of sexual behavior 39(1) 5-56     Legal issues or research issues
 
Chivers,M.L, Rieger,G., Latty,E., & Bailey,J.M 2004 A sex difference in the specificity of sexual arousal. Psychological Science 15(11) 736-744     Legal issues or research issues
 
Chivers,M.L. & Bailey J.M. 2005 A sex difference in features that elicit genital response Biological psychology 70 (2), 115-120     Legal issues or research issues
 
Chow, Eva W.C., & Choy, Alberto L. 2002 Clinical characteristics and treatment response to SSRI in a female pedophile.  Archives of Sexual Behavior 31(2), 211-215     Assessment or treatment related
Case study
Christiansen, A. R. & Thyer, B. A. 2002 Female Sexual Offenders -- A Review of Empirical Research  Journal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment 6(3), 1-16     Child victim, adult perp
               
Christiansen,A.R., & Thyer,B.A. 2002 Female Sexual Offenders--A Review of Empirical Research Journal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment 6(3) 1-16     Legal issues or research issues
 
Christopher, F. S., Madura, M., & Weaver, L. 1998 Premarital sexual aggressors: A multivariate analysis of social, relational, and individual variables Journal of Marriage and the Family 56-69     Child victim, adult perp
Found that adversarial gender beliefs were predictive of sexual coercion among women and hostility towards men best predicted sexual coercion among women.
Christopher, F. S., Owens, L. A., & Stecker, H. L. 1993 An examination of single men’s and women’s sexual aggressiveness in dating relationships Journal of Social and Personal Relationships 10 (4), 511-527     Adult victim, adult perp
Had 900+ college students fill out measures regarding use of Pressure & Manipulation strategies (includes persuasion and alcohol/drugs) and Antisocial Strategies (includes use of force, threats, ridicule, sulking and guilt), whether they wanted more/less or same amount of sex and whether or not they were in a committed relationship. Found that committed women who either wanted more sex than their partner did, or less sex than their partner did were more likely to use Antisocial strategies than women who were not in committed relationships. The authors theorized that women in committed relationships believed that this gave them license to engage in socially unacceptable behaviors. The number of past coital partners was also related to women’s use of Pressure and Antisocial strategies.
Christopher, K., Lutz-Zois, C. J., & Reinhardt, A. R. 2007 Female sexual-offenders: Personality pathology as a mediator of the relationship between childhood sexual abuse history and sexual abuse perpetration against others.  Child Abuse and Neglect 31, 871-883     Child victim, adult perp
               
Christopher, Russell L. & Kathryn H. Christopher 2012 The Paradox of Statutory Rape  Indiana Law Journal 87 (2)     Out-dated, erroneous, etc.
“What once protected only virginal girls under the age of ten now also protects sexually aggressive males under the age of eighteen” (under 18 means they aren’t men) “…now exposes the adult rape victim to statutory rape liability
Christopher,F.S., Owens,L.A.,& Stecker, H.L. 1993 An examination of single men's and women's sexual aggressiveness in dating relationships Journal of Social and Perosnal Relationships 10 (4) 511-527     Adult victim, adult perp
.  Had 900+ college students fill out measures regarding use of Pressure & Manipulation strategies (includes persuasion and alcohol/drugs) and Antisocial Strategies (includes use of force, threats, ridicule, sulking and guilt), whether they wanted more/less or same amount of sex and whether or not they were in a committed relationship. Found that committed women who either wanted more sex than their partner did, or less sex than their partner did were more likely to use Antisocial strategies than women who were not in committed relationships.  The authors theorized that women in committed relationships believed that this gave them license to engage in socially unacceptable behaviors.  The number of past coital partners was also related to women's use of Pressure and Antisocial strategies.    
Clark, R., & Hatfield, E. 1989 Gender Differences in Receptivity to Sexual Offers  Journal of Psychology and Human Sexuality 1(2), 39-55     Adult victim, adult perp
(complete text in a .pdf file at link)
Clements, Hannah, David L Dawson & Roshan das Nair 2013 Female-perpetrated sexual abuse: a review of victim and professional perspectives Journal of Sexual Aggression: An international, interdisciplinary forum for research, theory and practice   Published online: 01 May 2013 1-10   Child victim, adult perp
Professional attitudes towards female-perpetrated sexual abuse (FPSA) reportedly reflect the gender-role expectations found in broader society, which cast males almost exclusively as sexual aggressors or willing sexual recipients, females as sexually non-coercive or victims and male-perpetrated sexual abuse as particularly significant or injurious. Such views, however, appear to stand in contrast to the perspectives of individuals who have experienced FPSA. This paper details a systematic review of peer-reviewed quantitative and qualitative literature examining these different (professional and victim) perspectives. Although the methodological shortcomings of primary papers limit the conclusions that can be drawn, the findings suggest that victim and professional perspectives of FPSA remain discrepant; professionals generally considered FPSA as less serious, less harmful and less deserving of investigation than male-perpetrated abuse; while victims of FPSA felt their experiences influenced significantly their psychological wellbeing and abilities to form and maintain interpersonal relationships. These findings are discussed in relation to professional practice and suggestions for future research.
Clements,H., Dawson, D.L., & das Nair, R 2014 Female-perpetrated sexual abuse a review of victim and professional perspectives. Journal of Sexual Aggression  20(2), 197-215     Legal issues or research issues
Review of both qualitative and quantitative peer reviewed studies, found that professionals view female perpetrated sexual abuse less serious, harmful or needing investigation than that by males despite the victims finding it to have negatively and significantly impacted them
Clements-Schreiber, M. E., & Rempel, J. K. 1995 Women’s Acceptance of Stereotypes about Male Sexuality: Correlations with Strategies to Influence Reluctant Partners. Canadian Journal of Human Sexuality 4 (4)     Adult victim, adult perp
               
Clements-Schreiber, M., Rempel, J., & Desmarais, S. 1998 Women's sexual pressure tactics and adherence to related attitudes: A step toward prediction [90] Journal of Sex Research 35(2), 197-205     Adult victim, adult perp
               
Cocca, C. 2004 Prosecuting Mrs. Robinson: Gender Neutral Statutory Rape Laws Jailbait: the politics of statutory rape laws in the United States Chapter 3, pg 63 New York, NY: State University of New York Press   Child victim, adult perp
               
Cochran, C. C., Frazier, P. A., & Olson, A. M. 1996 Predictors of responses to unwanted sexual attention  Psychology of Women Quarterly 21(2), 207-226     Adult victim, adult perp
N=4,011 male/female university students and faculty, surveyed regarding unwanted sexual attention. 3% of women were harassed by other women, 56% of men were harassed by women.
Cohen,D.K. 2011 Causes of Sexual Violence During Civil War: Crossing National Evidence (1980-2009)  Minnesota International Relations Colloquium Minneapolis, MN March       Legal issues or research issues
Analyzes why some armies use rape as weapon in war and other groups do not; the difference appears related to whether the army is volunteer or forcibly 'recruited'.  In the latter cases, rape can be used as a form of 'combatant socialization'.   In the civil war in Sierra Leon, the Revolutionary United Front army abducted women as fighters (24%) and were the army with more mixed gender gang rape perpetrators (25.5% of the gang rapes). The women soldiers were involved in about a quarter of the rapes involving this army, both in holding down victims and in penetrating them with objects. 
Cohen,D.K. 2013 Female combatants and the perptration of violence: Wartime rape in the Sierra Leone civil war  World Politics 65(03), 383-415     Adult victim, adult perp
 
Collings, S.J. 1995 The long-term effects of contact and noncontact forms of child sexual abuse in a sample of university men Child abuse & neglect 19(1), 1-6     Specifically on male victims
 
Collins, Jennifer M.   Lady Madonna, Children at Your Feet: The Criminal Justice System's Romanticization of the Parent-Child Relationship http://wakespace.lib.wfu.edu/bitstream/handle/10339/15876/Collins Lady Madonna, Children at Your Feet The Criminal Justice System's Romanticization of the Parent-Child Relationship.pdf?sequence=1       Legal issues or research issues
There are several novels that touch on or focus on female sexual offending.  While these in no way can be seen as realistic accounts of the problem, they do at least bring the concept into the minds of the general public.  As yet, no one appears to have written an account similiar to what research suggest acctually occurs (adult female perp does not have a mental illness or character disorder).   What Was She Thinking?: Notes on a Scandal by Zoe Heller. Kingdom of Childhood by Rebecca Coleman.  Tampa by Alissa Nutting (review indicates this is a novel about a female sociopath molesting a 14 yr old male, contains multiple sexual scenes and could be considered child porn.  THe author did note in an interview that there are lots of things kids want to do that are bad for them and we don't allow).  A House Divided: Suspicions of Mother-Daughter Incest by Abramson and Pinkerton. (2001): story of Helen Cross who was accused of molesting her 5 yr old daughter, charges were later dropped. Author is sexologist who claimed that mother-daughter sexual abuse was vitually nonexistent. (p.193).
Collins-McKinnell, C.R. 2014 Towards characterizing the female sexual offfender; a systematic review of research articles.  Unpublished Master's thesis, Univeristy of South Africa       Legal issues or research issues
 
Colson, M.H.; L. Boyer, K. Baumstarck, A.D. Loundou 2013 Female sex offenders: A challenge to certain paradigms Sexologies       Child victim, adult perp
From a total 4,712 publications, identified using keywords searches on Medline, EMBASE, and PsycInfo (1984 to December 2011), we selected 61 papers using methodological criteria of evidence-based medicine. Our literature review studied 6,293 cases of female sex offenders in these 611 publications. Results: Our review, conducted on a large population covering 61 of the most recent acceptable evidence-based studies, enables us to confirm three already-known suppositions: (1) female sex offenders have themselves often been victims not only of sex abuse (49.1%), but perhaps more importantly, of other types of family violence and instability (55.4%); (2) 51.2% suffer from psychiatric disorders, depression and/or mental retardation; (3) they are more likely to attack their own children or other close relatives before looking for victims outside of their family unit (63.9%). However, there are other generally held beliefs that do not seem to be based on fact and should certainly be reviewed, in particular concerning the belief that female sex offenders are not dangerous: 1) alcohol and drug abuse appeared in our series as less significant (29.1%) than previously described in older research, and seemed to confirm the results found with more rigorous data and larger scope studies described in the more recent literature; 2) female sex offenders are more likely to choose male victims (60%) over female victims (40%); 13.3% of them do not have any sexual preference; 3) contrary to popular belief, more female sex offenders commit their first crime alone than with an accomplice (66.7% of them act alone); 4) violence and coercion is far from absent when a female commits a sex offense (45.8% of cases); 5) although repeat sex offenses are rare, in a large number of cases (40.3%), female sex offenders have already been charged with other criminal offenses, or have repeat offenses in non-sexual criminal acts.
Condy, S. R., Templer, D. I., Brown, R., & Veaco, L. 1987 Parameters of sexual contact of boys with women  Archives of Sexual Behavior 16(5), 379-394     Specifically on male victims
N=359 college males compared to 212 male inmates. 15% of inmate sample cited a history child sexual abuse by a female but none of the college sample cited it. The majority of women were friends, neighbors, baby sitters, and strangers to the boy. Intercourse and genital touching were the predominant forms of sexual abuse.
Cook, N. E., Barese, T. H., & Dicataldo, F. 2010 The Confluence of Mental Health and Psychopathic Traits in Adolescent Female Offenders  Criminal Justice and Behavior 37, 1,119-135     Child/adolescent perp
50 juvenile females given PCL-YV, compared to similar males. 58.5% of females had ‘proactive’ violence, 70.7% had non-intimate victim. The females were more likely than the males to have been hospitalized in a psych facility, which may represent the gendered way they were viewed.
Cook, N.E., Barese, T.H. & Dictaldo, F. 2010 The Confluence of mental health and Psychopathic Traits in Adolescent Female Offenders Criminal Justice and Behavior 37, 1 ,119-135     Legal issues or research issues
50 juvenile females given PCL-YV, compared to similar males. 58.5% of females had 'proactive' violence, 70.7% had non-intimate victim. The females were more likely than the males to have been hospitalized in a psych facility, which may represent the gendered way they were viewed. 
Cook, Philip W. & Tammy L. Hodo 2013 Women who sexually abuse men: the hidden side of rape, stalking, harassment and sexual assault     Praeger: Santa Barbara 2013   Child victim, adult perp
               
Cooper, A. J., Swaminath, S., Baxter, D., & Poulin, C. 1990 A female sex offender with multiple paraphilias: A psychologic, physiologic (laboratory sexual arousal) and endocrine case study.  Canadian Journal of Psychiatry 35(4), 334-337     Child victim, adult perp
               
Corrections Service of Canada 2002 Female sex offenders: A review of the literature      Ottawa, Canada   Child victim, adult perp
               
Cortoni, F. 2010 Female Sexual Offenders: A Special Subgroup Managing High-Risk Sex Offenders in the Community: Risk Management, Treatment and Social Responsibility (pp. 159-173 Portland, OR: Willan Publishing K. Harrison Child victim, adult perp
               
Cortoni, F., & Hanson, R. K. 2005 A review of the recidivism rates of adult female sexual offenders (R-169).      Ottawa: Research Branch, Correction Service of Canada   Child victim, adult perp
               
Cortoni,F 2010 Female Sexual Offenders: A Special Subgroup In K. Harrison (Ed.) Managing High-Risk Sex offenders in the Community: Risk Management, Treatment and Social Responsibility 159-173 Portland OR Willan Publishing   Legal issues or research issues
 
Cortoni,F.,, Sandler, J.C. % Freeman, N.J. 2014 Women Convicted of Promoting Prostitution of a Minor Are Different From Women Convicted of Traditional Sexual Offenses.  A brief Research Report Sexual abuse: A journal of research and treatment  27(3), 324-334     Assessment or treatment related
Discussed problem in places like New York State where they enacted laws making non-sexual offenses like promoting prostitution into a sex crime; claimed the crimes are sexually motivated but seem to miss that sexual motivation is within the john, not the pimp.  Among other issues, this skews the recidivism research as the pimps have a much higher re-arrest rate. N=94 women convicted of 'sexual offenses', compared pimps to traditional FSOs.  Female pimps had more general criminal histories (robbery, theft, fraud, drugs), were more antisocial than FSOs, have different Criminogenic features.  64.8% of the traditional FSOs had deviant sexual interest, 27.3% had a related child victim. 
Coxell, Adrian; Michael King, Gillian Mezey, and Dawn Gordon 1999 Lifetime prevalence, characteristics, and associated problems of non-consensual sex in men: cross sectional survey  British Medical Journal 1999 27; 318(7187): 846–850     Specifically on male victims
2474 of 3142 men (79%) agreed to participate; 71/2468 (standardized rate 2.89%) reported non-consensual sexual experiences as adults, 128/2423 (5.35%,) reported non-consensual sexual experiences as children, and 185/2406 (7.66%) reported consensual sexual experiences as children that are illegal under English law. Almost 3% of men in England report non-consensual sexual experiences as adults, 13% reported sexual experiences as children that were non-consensual or illegal. 21% of the child sexual assault was done by female perps and the mean age of the victims was 11 years. Regarding female perps, 46% were forced to perform oral sex on the perp, 50% were forced to have intercourse with the perp, 4% were anally penetrated. 28 cases involved a boy molested by a sole female and 2 of a boy molested by a female/male couple. Only 2 males reported their victimization to police. In 91% of the Statutory rape cases(‘consensual sex with child by person 5+ yrs older), the perp was female, the mean age of the victim was 14. 37% of the men who has ‘consensual’ sex as a kid went on to report psych symptoms. 48% of the adult men who were raped as by a female reported psych symptoms.
Craig S. M. 1998 When the tables are turned: Verbal sexual coercion among college women  Sexually Aggressive Women: Current Perspectives and Controversies   New York, NY: The Guilford Press In P. B. Anderson, & C. J. Struckman-Johnson Adult victim, adult perp
               
Craissati, J., McClurg, G., & Browne, K. 2002 Characteristics of perpetrators of child sexual abuse who have been sexually victimized as children Sexual Abuse: A Journal of Research and Treatment 14(3), 221-235     Child victim, adult perp
19% of the participants reported child sexual abuse by a woman.
Cranford, S., & Williams, R. 1998 Critical issues in managing female offenders  Corrections Today 60(7), 130-135     Child victim, adult perp
               
Crawford, C. 1997 Forbidden Femininity: Child Sexual Abuse and Female Sexuality      Aldershot, UK: Ashgate Publishing Co   Child victim, adult perp
               
Crawford, E. 2010 A grounded theory analysis of the perpetration of child sexual ause by female sex offenders Doctoral dissertation, Walden University       Legal issues or research issues
Looked at experiences/attitudes of convicted F.S.O.’s, used pre-existing descriptive data. Based upon the perp’s self-reports.  Focused on perp’s loneliness and desire to please a male partner.  
Crawford, M., & Popp, D. 2003 Sexual double standards: A review and methodological critique of two decades of research  Journal of Sex Research 40(1), 13-26     Child victim, adult perp
               
Crawford,A 2014 UK paedophiles pay to watch child sex abuse in Philippines :    BBC News   Legal issues or research issues
(note that the women in the video (all trying to hide their faces) were the perps who brought the minors for sexual abuse and weren’t the victims) 
Crockett, L. C. 2001 The deepest wound: How a journey to El Salvador led to healing from mother-daughter incest      Lincoln, NE: Writer’s Showcase   Child victim, adult perp
               
Crome,S.A. 2006 Male survivors of sexual assault and rape Australian Institute of Family Studies        Specifically on male victims
 
Cuk, Renata   Sexual violence against men in armed conflicts. Course: Gender, Sexuality and Violent Conflict.  Beyond Oppositional Imagination.  Miroyna,Akademia (Peace Academy)        Specifically on male victims
 
Curry, Theodore R., Gang Lee, and S. Fernando Rodriguez. 2004 Does victim gender increase sentence severity? Further explorations of gender dynamics and sentencing outcomes.  Crime & Delinquency 50, no. 3 (2004): 319-343     Adult victim, adult perp
Data from Texas 1991 for assault, robbery, homicide in 7 large metro areas: female victims result in substantially longer sentences than male victims. 10% of the perpetrators were female, 3% of the cases involved female perp/female victim, 6% involved female perp/male victim.
Curtis,R., Terry, K. Dank, M., Dombrowski,K.,& Khan,B. 2008 The commercial sexual explotation of children in New York City.  Volume 1.  The CSEC population in New York City: Size, characteristics, and needs (NCJ Publiction NO 225083)  Bureau of Justice Statistics, Washington DC Washington DC: Bureau of Justice Statistics US Department of Justice        Legal issues or research issues
               
D'Abreu, L.C.F., & Krahe,B. 2015 Vulnerability  to Sexual Victimization in Female and Male College Students in Brazil: Cross Sectional and Prospective Evidence Archives of sexual behavior pages 01-15     Adult victim, adult perp
N=573 male/female heterosexual Brazilian college students. Defined sexual aggression as behavior done with intent/result of making other person engage in sex despite his/her unwillingness. Also did prospective analysis with subsample N=250, 6 months later.  30.8% of males reported at least one experience of sexual victimization since the age of 14 and 13.8% experienced sexual victimization in the preceding 6 month periods (10% were not first-time victims); majority of perps (74%) were women. 6.8% of men reported having been victim of completed rape during lifetime and 2.8% within last 6 months.  2.8% of men had experienced attempted rape in last 6 months.  17.5% of men had experienced some form of unwanted sexual experience since age 14 yrs
Dahinten, V. S. 2003 Peer Sexual Harassment in Adolescence: The Function of Gender Le harcelement sexuel par des pairs a ladolescence: le role de lappartenance sexuelle 35(2), 56-73 CJNR (Canadian Journal of Nursing Research)   Child victim, adult perp
               
Darling, Andrea J and Georgios A. 2013 Antonopoulos Notes on a Scandal’: Why do Females Engage in Abuse of Trust Behaviours? International Journal of Criminology and Sociology 2013, 2, 525-537     Child victim, adult perp
Quantitative Analysis of 10 cases of female sex offenders against kids in England. Noted that all the F.S.O.s engaged in sexual behavior with minors while in a position of trust (teachers, foster care providers, teaching assistant), all solo offenders, but only 1 was dealt with via criminal courts; remainder were ‘cautioned’. One perp had 4 male victims, the remainder had only 1 victim, perp ages ranged from 26-44 yrs. Only one perp reported a history of her own childhood sexual victimization. Majority of the perps viewed victim as ‘willing’ and not harmed. 2 of the perps threatened self-harm to victim (coercion), most had stable job histories, only legal problems were motor vehicle violations. Half of the perps were willing to leave partners to stay with child victims. Most used kid for emotional gratification and 50% had sexual gratification as a primary or secondary motivation. All engaged in victim blaming, minimizing of harm and saw the kid as capable of having an equitable relationship with the adult perp.
Davies, Michelle 2002 Male sexual assault victims: A selective review of the literature and implications for support services. Aggression and Violent Behavior 7, no. 3 (2002): 203-214     Specifically on male victims
               
Davies, Michelle 2013 Effects of victim gender, age and sexuality on perceptions of sexual assaults committed by women Perceptions of Female Offenders 93-100 Springer New York, New York   Child victim, adult perp
Excellent review of the research on the topic
Davies, Michelle & Paul Rogers 2006 Perceptions of male victims in depicted sexual assaults: a review of the literature  Aggression and Violent Behavior 11 367-377     Specifically on male victims
States that support, help and research for male victims is 20+ years behind that for female victims. Notes that teacher-lover’ subtype gets most media attention because it’s easiest to sensationalize (would never use that term if sexes were reversed)
Davies, Michelle and Hudson, Jenefer 2011 Judgments Toward Male and Transgendered Victims in a Depicted Stranger Rape Journal of Homosexuality 58 (2). pp. 237-247     Child victim, adult perp
There has been an increasing amount of research interest into perceptions of male rape in recent years. However, no research has assessed how people react when a transgendered person is raped. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of transgendered status and sexuality on victim blame and perceived severity in a depicted rape scenario. The sexuality of the victim was manipulated to include a heterosexual, homosexual, cross-dresser, female-to-male transsexual, and male-to-female transsexual. It was predicted that the heterosexual victims would be judged the most positively and that heterosexual male participants would make the most anti-victim judgments. One hundred thirty-three lesbian, gay male, and heterosexual members of the general population read a scenario depicting a rape and then completed a questionnaire measuring victim blame and perceived severity of the assault. Results conformed to the predictions. Results are discussed in relation to traditional gender roles and homophobia.
Davies, Michelle, and Paul Rogers 2009 Perceptions of blame and credibility toward victims of childhood sexual abuse: Differences across victim age, victim-perpetrator relationship, and respondent gender in a depicted case. Journal of Child Sexual Abuse 18, no. 1 (2009): 78-92     Child victim, adult perp
               
Davies, Michelle, and Paul Rogers 2009 Perceptions of blame and credibility toward victims of childhood sexual abuse: Differences across victm age, victim-perpetrator relationship, and respondent gender in a depcited case Journal of Child sexual Abuse 18 78-92     Legal issues or research issues
 
Davies, Michelle, Austen, Kerry and Rogers, Paul 2011 Sexual Preference, Gender and Blame Attributions in Adolescent Sexual Assault Journal of Social Psychology 151 (5). 592-607     Child victim, adult perp
The study investigated the impact of victim sexual orientation, perpetrator gender, and participant gender on judgments toward a 15-year-old male victim of a depicted sexual assault. N=188, vignette of sexual assault of a 15-year-old male victim, varied sexual orientation and perp gender. All participants, regardless of gender, made more positive judgments toward the female as opposed to male perpetrator.
Davies, Michelle, Paul Pollard, and John Archer 2001 The influence of victim gender and sexual orientation on judgments of the victim in a depicted stranger rape Violence and Victims 16, (6) 607-619     Specifically on male victims
Used vignettes of sexual assault, changed the victim’s gender and sexual orientation. Men judged gay male victims more negatively than females, but also blamed the heterosexual male victims of sexual assaults by women more. Male respondents seemed to make assumption that a male victim should/could fight or escape a male attacker, should acquiesce to a female attacker; gender related attribution bias.
Davies, Michelle, Walker, Jayne, Archer, John and Pollard, Paul 2013 The scripting of male and female rape Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research 5 (2). 68-76     Child victim, adult perp
In Press
Davies,Michelle, Paul Pollard, and John Archer 2001 The influence of victim gender and sexual orientation on judgments of the victim in a depcited stranger rape Violence and Victims 16 (6), 607-619     Adult victim, adult perp
.  Used vignettes of sexual assault, changed the victim's gender and sexual orientation. Men judged gay male victims more negatively than females, but also blamed the heterosexual male victims of sexual assaults by women more.  Male respondents seemed to make assumption that a male victim should/could fight or escape a male attacker, should acquiesce to a female attacker; gender related attribution bias.
Davin, P. A. 1993 The Best Kept Secret: A Study of Female Sex Offenders Doctoral dissertation   Fielding Institute   Child victim, adult perp
               
Davin, P. A. 1999 Secrets revealed: A study of female sex offenders Sexual Abusers: Three Views Female Sexual Abusers: Three Views 9-134 Brandon, VT: Safer Society Press P. A. Davin, J. R. Hislop, & T. Dunbar Out-dated, erroneous, etc.
               
Davin, P. A., Dunbar, T., & Hislop, J. 1999 Female Sexual Abusers: Three Views Sexual Abusers: Three Views     Brandon, VT, Safer Society Press   Out-dated, erroneous, etc.
               
Davis, J. 2006 Perspectives and psychosocial characteristics of female sex offenders: Implications for counseling  Unpublished Ph.D. dissertation   Texas Southern University   Child victim, adult perp
               
Dawson, S.J., Bannerman, B.A., & Lalumiere M.L. 2014 Paraphilic interests: AN exmaination of sex difference in a nonclinical sample Sexual abuse: a journal of research and treatment 10790631525645       Assessment or treatment related
. N=305 Canadian Males and 710 Canadian Females, mostly white, mostly students, mostly heterosexual. Gave measures of Paraphilia, intellectual ability, non-right-handedness, susceptibility to illness, sex drive, sexual compulsivity, Sociosexuality (mating effort/casual sex), impulsivity and sensation-seeking, plus 2 measures of Masculinity/Femininity (Bem sex role inventory and Lippa's gender diagnosticity) along with a social desirability measure.  Noted previous research on paraphilias largely ignored females.   Significantly greater proportion of men (compared to women) reported arousal to voyeurism, sadism, fetishism, Biastophilia (sex with non-consenting person aka rape) and urine but similar proportions of males/females reported arousal to masochism, exhibitionism, obscene phone calls, transvestism, feces and animals. Greater 'masculinity' scores on the 2 measures was positively associated with reports of greater arousal to paraphilia in women.   Sex drive seemed to be the factor explaining the interest in paraphilia as compulsive sexual interest and sociosexuality were strongly correlated with paraphilic interest in both sexes, as was impulsivity and sensation seeking.  The fact women's higher scores in areas of dominance and assertiveness significantly correlated with paraphilia suggests that Gender Roles may be a factor.  
de Haas, S. Berlo. W Bakker F. Vanwesenbeeck,I. 2012 Prevalence and characteristics of sexual violence in the Netherlands, the risk of re-victimation and pregnancy: Results from a national population survery Violence and Victims   27 (4), 592-608     Legal issues or research issues
Study investigated the prevalence of sexual violence in the Netherlands ; listed experience of sexual violence over lifetime, before age 16 and within the past year. N=6,000 males/females ages 15-70. Prevalence rate was 21% for males.  30% of male victims of child sexual abuse went on to have adult victimization
Decou,C.R. ,Cole, T.T.,Rowland,S.E., Kaplan S.P., & Lynch,S.M. 2015 An ecological process model of female sex offending: The role of victimization psychological distress, and life stressors Sexual Abuse: a journal of resarch and treatment 27 (3) 302-323     Assessment or treatment related
Description of results of interviews with 24 incarcerated FSOs from US northwest.  All but 1 offended against a minor. Themes included poor boundaries, viewing victim as a peer who could engage in a consensual and reciprocal relationship, engaging in behavior to meet personal needs and for self-gratification, 
Deering, R., & Mellor, D. 2007 Female-Perpetrated Child Sex Abuse: Definitional and Categorization Analysis  Psychiatry, Psychology and Law 14(2), 218-226     Legal issues or research issues
matched 7 cases each female-perpetrated child sexual & male-perpetrated child sex abuse. All offenders were sentenced to imprisonment, but in general the women were more likely than the men to receive less jail time and lower non-parole periods because their personal backgrounds or situation at the time of the offending were perceived as worthy of sympathy, and they were considered as likely to be rehabilitated.
Deering, R., & Mellor, D. 2009 Sentencing of male and female child sex offenders : Australian study  Psychiatry, Psychology and Law 16(3), 394-412     Legal issues or research issues
               
Deering, R., & Mellor, D. 2011 An exploratory qualitative study of the self-reported impact of female-perpetrated childhood sexual abuse Journal of child sexual abuse 20 (1), 58-76     Child victim, adult perp
In this exploratory qualitative study, a sample of nine men and five women who reported that they had been sexually abused by women in their childhood were recruited from the general community. They completed a questionnaire that asked them to describe various aspects of their abuse experiences and the perceived consequences. For both men and women, the abuse was associated with negative outcomes across a range of functional areas in both childhood and adulthood.
Deering, Rebecca, and David Mellor 2010 What is the prevalence of female-perpetrated child sexual abuse? A review of the literature. American Journal of Forensic Psychology 28 (3) 25-53     Child victim, adult perp
               
Dell, A., & Boe, R. 1998 Female young offenders in Canada Ottawa: Research Branch   Correctional Service of Canada   Child victim, adult perp
111 Juvenile Canadian females were charged with sexual offenses in 1993 and 70 in 1997, with the prairie provinces over-represented compared to other provinces. However, only about 75% of the cases in 1993 were processed through the court systems, and only about 68% were processed there in 1997. This study did not explicate the common dispositions of the sexual crimes.
Denov, M. S. 2001 A culture of denial: Exploring professional perspectives on female sex offending.  Canadian Journal of Criminology 43(3), 303-329     Child victim, adult perp
summarized this attitude saying female sexual offending is reframed from sphere of intentional criminality to one in line with cultural views of women (mentally ill, less severe, controlled by male perpetrator).
Denov, M. S. 2003 To a Safer Place? Victims of sexual abuse by females and their disclosures to professionals  Child Abuse & Neglect 27(1), 46-61     Assessment or treatment related
               
Denov, M. S. 2003 The myth of innocence: Sexual scripts and the recognition of child sexual abuse by female perpetrators  Journal of Sex Research 40(3), 303-314     Child victim, adult perp
               
Denov, M. S. 2004 Perspectives on Female Sex Offending: A Culture of Denial      Aldershot, UK: Ashgate Publishing Company   Child victim, adult perp
               
Denov, M. S. 2004 The Long-Term Effects of Child Sexual Abuse by Female Perpetrators: A Qualitative Study of Male and Female Victims  Journal of Interpersonal Violence 19 (10), 1137-1156     Child victim, adult perp
N=14 adults (7 male/7 female) survivors of childhood sexual assault by females. 6 were victimized by Mother, 2 by Grandmother, 1 by Nun, no perp was accompanied by a co-offender. Most had depression, SI, rage issues. Average age of onset was 5 years old, stopped by age 12 (onset of puberty). 64% reported experiencing penetration and/or oral sex, 71% reported experiencing fondling and/or simulated intercourse. 86% reported fear of molesting children, 4 consciously decided never to have children. 2 males and 2 females reported sexually abusing children; males were both reported, charged and convicted, neither female was.
Denov, M., & Cortoni, F. 2006 Women who sexually abuse children  Comprehensive mental health practice with sex offenders and their families 71-99 Binghamton, NY: The Haworth Press. C. Hilarski & J.S. Wodarski Child victim, adult perp
               
Dent-Brown,K. 1993 Child sexual abuse: Problems for adult surviors.  Journal of Mental Health 2(4), 329-338     Legal issues or research issues
 
Dhaliwal, G. K., Gauzas, L., Antonowicz, D. H., & Ross, R. R. 1996 Adult male survivors of childhood sexual abuse: Prevalence, sexual abuse characteristics, and long-term effects Clinical Psychology Review 16(7), 619-639     Child victim, adult perp
               
Dinwiddie,S, Heath,A.C.,Dunne,M.P., Bucholz,K.K., Madden,P.A., Slutske, W.S., & Martin, N.G. 2000 Early sexual abuse and lifetime psychopathology: a co-twin-control study.   Psychological Medicine 30(1) 41-52     Specifically on male victims
N= 5995 Australian twins; history of CSA was reported by 2.5% of the men. In the sample as a whole, those reporting CSA were more likely to receive lifetime diagnoses of major depression, conduct disorder, panic disorder and alcoholism, and were more likely to report suicidal ideation and a history of suicide attempt.
Dollar, K.M., Perry, A.R., Fromuth, M., & Holt, A.R. 2004 Influence of gender roles on perceptions of teacher/adolescent student sexual relations  Sex Roles: A Journal of Research 50(1-2), 91-101     Legal issues or research issues
male teacher/male student dyad was viewed as the least normative, and the female teacher/male student dyad was perceived as the most normative.
Doroszewicz, Krystyna & Gordon B. Forbes 2008 Experiences With Dating Aggression and Sexual Coercion Among Polish College Students Journal of Interpersonal Violence 2008 23 (1) 58-73     Child victim, adult perp
Dating aggression and sexual coercion were studied in Polish college women (n = 100) and men (n = 101) using the Revised Conflict Tactics Scales (Straus, Hamby, Boney-McCoy, & Sugarman, 1996). Rates of psychological and physical aggression, sexual coercion, and injury were compared for men and women. Rates of physical aggression, sexual coercion, and injury were compared with preliminary data from 31 universities and 16 countries from the International Dating Violence Study (IDVS; Straus, 2003, 2004). Rates of psychological aggression, physical aggression, and sexual coercion were high with respective rates of 77%, 36%, and 42% for men and 89%, 48%, and 40% for women. Relative to the IDVS samples, Polish men and women had high levels of physical aggression and sexual coercion. Relative to the IDVS samples, women, but not men, had high levels of causing injury to their partner and using threats or actual physical force to obtain oral, anal, or vaginal intercourse. The possible influences of high levels of domestic violence in Polish society and rapid changes in women's roles are discussed.
Dowden, C., & Andrews, D. 1999 What works for female offenders: A meta-analytic review  Crime and Delinquency 45,4, 438-452     Assessment or treatment related
Is about female offenders generally, not sex offenders specifically, but still a useful study.
Dube, S. R., et al. 2005 Long-term consequences of childhood sexual abuse by gender of victim American Journal of Preventive Medicine 28, 430-438     Child victim, adult perp
               
Dunbar, T. 1993 Women Who Sexually Molest Female Children Unpublished Ph.D. dissertation   Los Angeles: University of Southern California   Child victim, adult perp
               
Dunbar, T. 1999 Women who sexually molest female children  Female Sexual Abusers: Three Views 311-377 Brandon, VT: Safer Society Press P. A. Davin, J. C. Hislop, & T. Dunbar Child victim, adult perp
               
Duncan, D. F. 1990 Prevalence of sexual assault victimization among heterosexual and gay/lesbian university students  Psychological Reports 66, 65-66     Adult victim, adult perp
               
Duncan, K. 2004 Healing from the Trauma of Childhood Sexual Abuse: The Journey for Women.      Connecticut : Praeger Publishers   Child victim, adult perp
               
Duncan, K. 2006 Gender Equity in the Field of Child Sexual Abuse: Does Gender Matter in Sexual Offense Treatment for Females and their Victims? Equity in Sexual Abuse - Duncan 2006.pdf     Paper presented at the ATSA 2006 Conference in Chicago, Illinois.   Child victim, adult perp
               
Duncan, L. E., & Williams L. M., 1998 Gender role socialization and male-on-male vs. female-on-male child sexual abuse.  Sex Roles: A Journal of Research 39(9/10), 765-785     Specifically on male victims
Used hospitalized sample
Duncan,K 2004 Healing from the Trauma of Childhood Sexual Abuse: The Journey for Women     Connecticut: Praeger Publisher   Assessment or treatment related
 
Duncan,K 2010 Female Sexual Predators     Praeger   Out-dated, erroneous, etc.
 
Dunkel Curtis Scott & Eugene Mathes 2012 The role of life history strategy in the correspondence between being a victim and a perpetrator of sexual coercion Journal of Evolutionary Psychology 10 (3) 2012     Child victim, adult perp
The current investigation was undertaken to examine the possible role of life history (LH) strategy in the correspondence between being a victim of sexual coercion and being a perpetrator. Although victimhood was associated with LH strategies for males, and LH strategy was associated with perpetration for both sexes, mediation by LH strategy between victimhood and perpetrating was not supported. Support was found for life history strategy as a moderator, but only for females. Females with a fast life history strategy coupled with high levels of victimhood exhibited the highest levels of perpetration. The results were found while controlling for individual differences in age, aggression and self-control. While a correspondence between general (not sex specific) victimhood and perpetration was found, the relationship was not moderated by life history strategy. The role of LH strategy in accounting for individual difference in sexual coercion is discussed. It is speculated that greater plasticity in sexuality is a LH characteristic in females.
Durham, A.W. 2003 Young men surviving child sexual abuse. Research stories and lessons for therapeutic practice     Chichester: Wiley   Child victim, adult perp
               
Edelson, M. G., & Joa, D. 2010 Differences in legal outcomes for male and female children who have been sexually abused Sexual Abuse: A Journal of Research and Treatment 22, 427-442     Child victim, adult perp
Cases involving Male victims were less likely to be accepted for prosecution, had fewer charges and shorter sentences.
Edgardh, K., & Ormstad, K. 2000 Prevalence and characteristics of sexual abuse in a national sample of Swedish seventeen-year-old boys and girls Acta Paediatrica 88, 310–319     Child victim, adult perp
Representative samples of 2% of Sweden's 17-y-old male and female students and school non-attenders were selected in a two-step procedure. In all, 1943 students and 210 school non-attenders answered a self-administered anonymous questionnaire, distributed by school nurses. Six out of 170 questions dealt with personal experiences of child sexual abuse, i.e. age at onset, frequency of abuse and relationship to the offender. Peer abuse was excluded by the definitions used. The overall response rate was 92.2% for students and 44.2% for school dropouts. Among male and female students, 3.1% and 11.2%, respectively, acknowledged sexual abuse, 2.3% and 7.1%, respectively, when exhibitionism was excluded. Mean age at onset was 9.1 y (SD 4.3) for boys and 9.0 y (SD 3.9) for girls; 1.2% of the boys and 3.1% of the girls reported abusive oral, vaginal and/or anal intercourse. Suicide attempts or other acts of self-harm were reported by 33.3% of the male students reporting abuse and by 5.1%(p <0.001) of those who had not been abused,
Eisenberg, N., Owens, R. G., & Dewey, M. E. 1987 Attitudes of health professionals to child sexual abuse and incest  Child Abuse & Neglect 11(1), 109-116     Assessment or treatment related
attitudes of health professionals towards child victims of incest; 33% felt girls were more seriously affected than boys, Abuse that didn’t involve intercourse is seen as less damaging, abuse done by female was seen as less damaging.
Eldridge, H. 1994 Barbara’s story: A mother who sexually abused.  Female Sexual Abuse of Children 74-87 New York: The Guilford Press M. Elliott Child victim, adult perp
               
Eldridge, H., & Saradjian, J. 2000 Replacing the function of abusive behaviors for the offender: Remaking relapse prevention in working with women who sexually abuse children  Remaking Relapse Prevention with Sex Offenders: A Sourcebook 402-426 Newbury Park, CA: Sage Publications D.R. Laws, S.M. Hudson & T. Ward Assessment or treatment related
               
Eldridge, H., Elliott, I. A., & Ashfield, S. 2009 Assessment of women who sexually abuse children  Sexual abuse assessments: Using and developing frameworks for practice 213-227 London: Russell House Publishing M.C. Calder Assessment or treatment related
               
Ellen,Barbara 2009 http://www.thegarudian.com/commentisfree/2009/nov/29/barbara-ellen-madeleine-martin-comment Thinks female sexual abuse of minor age male is "pathetic, not predatory"       Specifically on male victims
 
Ellerstein, N., & Canavan, W. 1980 Sexual abuse of boys American Journal of Diseases of Children 134, 255-257     Specifically on male victims
In a retrospective review of 145 sexually abused children, 11% were male. The boys were more likely to be assaulted in a public place than were girls, and boys were more prone to physical injury. The relationship of the perpetrator to the child was similar for boys and girls as was the age of the children. This study emphasizes the existence of boys as victims of sexual abuse.
Elliot, D., & Briere, J. 1994 Forensic sexual abuse evaluations of older children – Disclosures and symptomology  Behavioral Sciences and the Law 12(3), 261-277     Child victim, adult perp
               
Elliott, A. J. & Peterson, L. W. 1993 Maternal sexual abuse of male children: When to suspect and how to uncover it  Postgraduate Medicine 94(1), 169-180     Specifically on male victims
               
Elliott, I. A., Eldridge, H. J., Ashfield, S., & Beech, A. R. 2010 Exploring Risk: Potential Static, Dynamic, Protective and Treatment Factors in the Clinical Histories of Female Sex Offenders  Journal of Family Violence 25(6), 595-602     Assessment or treatment related
N=43 F.S.O.s, found evidence of cognitive distortions related to offending including Uncontrollability, Children as Sexual, Dangerous World, Minimal Harm Caused by offending and sense of Entitlement.
Elliott, Ian A., and Sherry Ashfield 2011 The use of online technology in the modus operandi of female sex offenders Journal of Sexual Aggression 17, (1) 2011 92-104     Child victim, adult perp
In this review we examine the methods by which female sexual offenders may use communications technologies such as the internet in their offending behaviours. We outline the context of sexual abuse of children both by female perpetrators and by those using the internet. The topic is examined based on three criminogenic areas highlighted by Lambert and O'Halloran: (1) interpersonal/socialization deficits; (2) deviant sexual arousal; and (3) cognitive distortions and recognition barriers. We include elements drawn from anonymized clinical cases of female-perpetrated sexual abuse of children involving online technology. We present the argument that the characteristics of this population are likely to suggest that clinicians assessing cases of this nature may find it more useful to refer to the literature on female sexual offenders rather than that of male internet offenders.
Elliott, M. 1994 What survivors tell us – An overview  Female Sexual Abuse of Children 13-May New York: The Guilford Press Elliott, M. Child victim, adult perp
               
Elliott,Ian A., & Alexandra Bailey 2014 Female Sex offenders: gender and risk perception in Kieran McCartan (Ed) Responding to Sexual Offending: Perceptions, Risk, Management and Public Protection   Palgrave Macmillan   Legal issues or research issues
Discusses reasons western society continues to misperceive women as not sexually dangerous.  Authors applied Pickett, Mancini & Mears (2013) theories of public opinion about sex crimes and policies to FSOs. The Victim-oriented model focuses on the harm done to victims and is often related to retribution for the perp.  Authors note that the public perception that women as needing 'protection' (like children) automatically positions women as victims and men as perps and minimizes both the FSO and any male victims. The SO stereotype model focuses on SO's as a homogeneous group of predators who are both unmanageable and untreatable.  Cites Sjoberg & Gentry 2007 who argued that the stereotype that women are nurturing overshadows recognition that women engage in violence and leads to ways of accounting for women's violence that maintain this stereotype; women engage in violence to get revenge on a male, to support a male, or were coerced by a male, is mentally ill, or is deviantly sexual (as opposed to having sexually deviant interests). Notes that accounts of coercion may be inflated by FSOs, allowing them to be viewed as victims and maintain the stereotype.  Notes the preliminary research by Gannon et al suggesting that some FSOs may have biased ideas regarding male status that increase their experience of dependence.   They note that the low detection and low observed re-offense rate combined with these misunderstandings causes people to think that FSOs aren't a 'valid risk management concern'. Mentions a meta-analysis by Cortoni et al 2010 suggesting a low recidivism and notes the problems with detection and conviction, as well as noting the cycle where lack of policy on FSOs results in/fuels under-detection of FSO; FSOs are generally only detected by child protection agencies and then handled by the family rather than criminal courts, which keeps the public less aware, less anxious and less vigilant.   Cites Belknap (2001) who differentiated between Sex Differences and Gender Differences, suggested that criminal justice system be more 'gender responsive' by targeting 'female specific pathways to criminality'.  Recommends that CJS ensure parity with a range of services for both sexes
Elliott,M (ed). 1994 Female Sexual Abuse of Children     New York : The Guilford Press   Out-dated, erroneous, etc.
               
Ellis, Lee 1998 Why some sexual assaults are not committed by men: A biosocial analysis  Sexually Aggressive Women: Current Perspectives and Controversies 105-118   P. B. Anderson & C. Struckman- Johnson Child victim, adult perp
               
Embry, Randa & Lyons, Phillip M. 2012 Sex-based sentencing: sentencing discrepancies between male and female sex offenders Feminist Criminology 7 (2), 2012, pp146-162     Legal issues or research issues
Men receive longer sentences for sex offenses than women, supporting the chivalry hypothesis; Chivalry thesis, a form of paternalism, asserts that women are weaker and that their actions are not seen as completely valid. Women should not be held to the same standards as men in the CJS as they are not fully responsible for their actions. Grounded assumptions based on traditional roles: Blame-worthiness attribution (assumes women are less blameworthy based on her role as caretaker and statistically lower recidivism rate) & Bounded rationality (judges use when making their sentencing decisions; without sufficient information, judges may rely on stereotypes of groups). Cites Koons-Witt 2002, who found that, after accounting for personal characteristics of offenders based on gender roles, such as responsibility for child care, the impact of gender on sentencing decisions is diminished. Women w/ kids got less time, before sentencing guidelines were implemented. Cites Jeffries et al 2003 found that, after controlling for child care, women were still sentenced more leniently than men. Even after the implementation of determinate sentencing, judges are more apt to consider extralegal factors for women when making sentencing decisions. Used data from National Corrections Reporting Program, US DOJ 1998-2010, which included admissions and release info for 38 states, the California Youth Authority and the BOP. Condensed all categories down to 5: rape, statutory rape, sexual assault, child sexual assault and forcible sodomy. Took random sample of 3,000 cases from males and from females. Data showed that most cases for both gender was Sexual Assault, but all other cases showed relatively even distribution between genders, w/ exception of Statutory Rape; women accounted for 65.2% of these offenders. Factorial ANOVA showed that, not only do the variables Sex and Offense display significant differences between groups, but the interaction between the 2 variables also shows significant difference with regard to sentence length. Found significant differences in mean sentence length by gender for Rape, Child Sexual Assault and Forcible Sodomy; men are sentenced to longer prison terms
Erickson, C.L., & Olson, S.K. 2015 Perpetrators of Child Sexual Abuse With a Special Focus on Female Offenders  Doctoral dissertation       Child victim, adult perp
Used data collected at a Midwestern US child resource center in 1992. N=104 cases and 8.9% of the perps were female
Erickson, Pamela I., and Andrea J. Rapkin 1991 Unwanted sexual experiences among middle and high school youth Journal of Adolescent Health 12, no. 4 (1991): 319-325     Child/adolescent perp
Genders were similar regarding partner pressure and the influence of drugs and alcohol. Students who reported having had an unwanted sexual experience were more likely to report current risk taking behaviors, school problems, and health problems and those who had been physically forced were less likely to be currently sexually active and scored lower on a measure of current substance use than those who were not forced.
Erickson,Pamela I & Andrea J Rapkin 1991 "Unwanted sexual experiences among middle and high school youth." Journal of Adolescent Health  12 no 4 319-325     Out-dated, erroneous, etc.
Genders were similar regarding partner pressure and the influence of drugs and alcohol. Students who reported having had an unwanted sexual experience were more likely to report current risk taking behaviors, school problems, and health problems  and those who had been physically forced were less likely to be currently sexually active and scored lower on a measure of current substance use than those who were not forced.
Erooga, M. 2009 Towards safer organisations: adults who pose a risk to children in the workplace and implications for recruitment and selection      London: SPCC   Child victim, adult perp
               
Erooga, M., & Masson, H. C. 1999 Children and Young People Who Sexually Abuse Others: Challenges and Responses      London: Routledge   Child/adolescent perp
               
Erulkar,A.S. 2004 The experience of sexual coercion among young in Kenya International Family Planning Perspectives 182-189     Legal issues or research issues
11% of males reported experiencing sexxual coercion, these effects were observed for victims of both 7 and 12 years old while it was expected only for the 12 year old victims.
Esnard, Catherine, and Rafaele Dumas 2012 Perceptions of male victim blame in a child sexual abuse case: effects of gender, age and need for closure Psychology, Crime & Law ahead-of-print (2012): 1-28     Child victim, adult perp
384 French respondents read through a sexual abuse scenario in which the child victim's gender, perpetrator's gender and victim's age (7 vs. 12 years old) were manipulated. As expected, male respondents blamed the victim more than female respondents did, especially when the victim was a boy. Furthermore, male respondents blamed the perpetrator less than female respondents did, especially when the perpetrator was a woman and the victim a boy. However, these effects were observed for victims of both 7 and 12 years old while it was expected only for the 12-year-old victims.
Espelage, D.L., Basile, K.C., & Hamburger, M.E. 2012 Bullying perpetration and subsequent sexual violence perpetration among middle school students. Journal of Adolescent Health  50(1), 60-65     Legal issues or research issues
N=1,391 female & male students grades 5-8 in American Midwest; 22% of female students reported making sexual comments to other students, 7% spread sexual rumors about another person, 2% of girls pulled at another person's clothing. Behavior at this age appeared to be a form of homophobic bullying 
Espelage, D.L.,&De La Rue, L. 2013 Examining Predictors of Bullying and Sexual Violence Perpetration Among Middle School Female Students Perceptions of Female Offenders 25-45 Springer New York   Legal issues or research issues
N=576 female middle school students (grades 5-7, ages 11-15), American Midwest; used longitudinal study to see if there was an association between being a bully and perpetrating sexual harassment. Measured whether they made sexual comments, spread sexual rumors, groped other's clothing.  28% of the girls made sexual comments during last year. Predictors of sexual harassment were dismissive attitudes towards it and past perpetration of sexual harassment.  Bullying was predicted by sibling aggression and delinquency; the two did not overlap. 
Etherington, K. 1999 Maternal sexual abuse of males  Child Abuse Review 6(2), 107-117     Specifically on male victims
               
Euser,E.M., van Ijzendoorn, M.H., Prinzie,P.,, &Bakermans-Kranenburg, M.J. 2010 Prevalence of child maltreatment in the Netherlands.   Child Maltreatment 15(1), 5-17     Assessment or treatment related
2010 prevalence of CSA in residential/foster care; N=329 adolescents filled out self-report; 79 reported victimization while in care; 32% reported their perpetrator was female.  Also asked staff, who reported that there were 161 victims of CSA and 3% of the perps were female.  (in other words, kids weren't reporting it and they were definitely under-reporting the victimization by females)
Evans, Kathleen. 2012 Media Representations of Male and Female ‘Co-Offending’: How female offenders are portrayed in comparison to their male counterparts  Internet Journal of Criminology       Legal issues or research issues
               
Evans, Nikki Philippa Cosgrove, Bron Moth & Joanne Hewitson   Adolescent females who have engaged in sexually abusive behaviour: A survey for the STOP Adolescent Programme          Child/adolescent perp
               
Evert, K. 1987 When You're Ready. A Woman's Healing from Childhood Physical and Sexual Abuse by Her Mother      Walnut Creek, CA: Launch Press   Assessment or treatment related
               
Fagen, J.L., & Anderson, P.B. 2012 Contstruction masculinity in response to women's sexual advances Archives of sexual behavior 41(1) 261-270     Specifically on male victims
N=20 males who reported a history of unwanted sexual interactions with females.  Author theorized that males may set limitations on women's sexual advances in order to feel a sense of agency as demanded by traditional gendered sexual scripts. 
Fair, Cynthia D. & Jennifer Vanyur 2011 Sexual Coercion, Verbal Aggression, and Condom Use Consistency Among College Students Journal of American College Health 59 (4) 2011 273-280     Child victim, adult perp
17% of the college women reported engaging in sexual coercion with male partners. 35.5% of the college males reported experiencing sexual coercion from their female partners. There
Faller, K. 1995 A clinical sample of women who have sexually abused children  Journal of Child Sexual Abuse 4(3), 13-30     Child victim, adult perp
used a clinical sample 72 female sex offenders so they had a high level of impairment: 32% had some type of mental illness. 75% of the victims were related to the perp.
Faller, K. C. 1987 Women who sexually abuse children Violence & Victims 2(4), 263-276     Child victim, adult perp
Used a clinical sample of 40 female sex offenders so they had a high level of impairment: 18% had “psychotic features”, 33% were mentally retarded or had brain damage. Average victim age was <12 yrs. (women made up 14% of the sex offenders from sample from child abuse treatment center in Michigan) 90% of the victims were related to the perp.
Faller, K. C. 1988 The spectrum of sexual abuse in daycare: An exploratory study  Journal of Family Violence 3(4), 283-298     Child victim, adult perp
               
Faller, K. C. 1991 Polyincestuous families: An exploratory study Journal of Interpersonal Violence 6(3), 310-322     Child victim, adult perp
39% of the perpetrators were female, 69% of the cases involved female/male co-offending. In this study, group offending was more common with the mean # of identified perps per case at 3 people. About half the cases involved victimization of both male and female offspring. 1/3 of cases involved offense supportive cognitive distortions.
Faller, K.C. 1989 Characteristics of a clinical sample of sexually abused children: How boys and girl victims differ  Child Abuse and Neglect 13, 281-291.     Specifically on male victims
               
Faller,K. 1995 A clinical sample of women who have sexually abused children Journal of Child Sexual Abuse   4(3), 13-30     Child victim, adult perp
used a clinical sample 72 female sex offenders so they had a high level of impairment: 32%  had some type of mental illness.  75% of the victims were related to the perp.
Fanetti, M., Kobayashi, I., & Mitchell, DW. 2008 The effects of gender on decisions of guilt in cases of alleged child sexual abuse. American Journal of Forensic Psychology 26 (4) 31-40     Assessment or treatment related
               
Farina, K. A. and Mahoney, M. 2014 Juvenile Sex Offenders The Encyclopedia of Criminology and Criminal Justice 1–3     Child victim, adult perp
               
Fater,K.,&Mullaney,J.A. 2000 The lived experience of adult male survivors who allege choldhood sexual abuse by clergy. Issues in Mental Health Nursing 21(3), 281-295     Specifically on male victims
 
Fazel, S., Sjostedt, G., Grann, M,. & Langstrom, M. 2010 Sexual Offending in Women and Psychiatric Disorder: A National Case-Control Study  Archives of Sexual Behavior 39 (1), 161-167     Child victim, adult perp
               
Fedoroff, P. J., & Fishell, A. 1999 Paraphilic and other unconventional sexual disorders in girls and women Women’s Health: A Behavioral Medicine Approach   Oxford: Oxford Press Palace, E. M. Child victim, adult perp
               
Fedoroff, P.J., Fishell, A., & Fedoroff, B. 1999 A case series of women evaluated for paraphilic sexual disorders  The Canadian Journal of Human Sexuality 8(2), 127-139     Child victim, adult perp
               
Fehlow, P. 1975 The female sexual delinquent Psychiatrie, Neurologie und medizinishche Psychologie (Leipz) 27(10), 612-618     Out-dated, erroneous, etc.
               
Fehrenbach, P. A. & Monastersky, C. 1988 Characteristics of female adolescent sexual offenders American Journal of Orthopsychiatry 58(1), 148-151     Child/adolescent perp
Uses descriptive data from 28 of teenage girls who committed sexual offenses without male co-offenders. They found to have molested children of both genders with more female than male victims, often while babysitting. 15 committed rape (penetration), 13 committed ‘indecent liberties” (sexual assault w/o penetration), 36% had male victims, 57% had female victims.
Feiring,C., Taska, L., & Lewis,M 1996 A process model for understanding adaptation to sexual abuse.  The role of shame in defining stigmatizaion. Child abuse & neglect 20(8), 767-782     Legal issues or research issues
 
Felson, R.B., & Cundiff, P.R. 2014 Seuxal assault as a crime against young people.  Archives of sexual behavior 43(2) 273-284     Legal issues or research issues
 
Ferguson, C. and Meehan, D. 2005 An Analysis of Females Convicted of Sex Crimes in the State of Florida.  Journal of Child Sexual Abuse 14 (1), 75-90     Child victim, adult perp
               
Fiebert, M. S., & Tucci, M. 1998 Sexual coercion: Men victimized by women  Journal of Men's Studies 6(2), 127-133     Adult victim, adult perp
12-item inventory designed to assess mild, moderate, and severe forms of sexual coercion was administered to an ethnically diverse sample of 182 college men at California State University, Long Beach. Results reveal that 70% of subjects reported experiencing some form of sexual coercion within the past five years. Mild and moderate forms of sexual coercion were most commonly experienced. Younger men were somewhat more likely than older men to report being sexually coerced. An ethnic difference in response was found on one item.
Fiebert, M.S. & Osburn, K 2001 Effect of gender and ethnicity on self-reports of mild, moderate, and severe sexual coercion Sexuality and Culture 5(2), 3-11     Legal issues or research issues
N=452 college students; used Revised Conflicts Tactics Scale (items include coercion up to threats and violence). Males were more likely to report having experienced sexual coercion (all levels including severe/use of force).  Females were more likely to report feeling 'sexually taken advantage of', which may be an artefact of gender role expectations in the reporting.
Fieldman, J.P., & Crespi, T.D. 2002 Child sexual abuse: Offenders, disclosure and school-based initiatives Adolescence  Volume 37(145), 2002, 151-160     Assessment or treatment related
 
FIFTAL-ALARID, LEANNE 2000 Sexual Assault and Coercion among Incarcerated Women Prisoners: excerpts from prison letters  The Prison Journal 2000; 80; 391     Child victim, adult perp
There are few existing studies that address sexual misconduct of women offenders toward other women prisoners. This qualitative study examined themes of sexual coercion and sexual assault among women offenders that surfaced in letters sent by one woman offender from prison during a period of 5 years. Four themes emerged from the data: (a) female apathy toward sexual coercion and sexual assault, (b) the femme as the sexual aggressor, (c) insight into one female rape situation, and (d) institutional factors contributing to sexual coercion. To prevent incidences of sexual assault by other offenders, policy suggestions specific to the study included a staff focus on identifying and consistently curbing sexual coercion and installing monitored cameras in restriction dorms. Academic experts in the area of female prisoner subcultures have only recently acknowledged the possibility of female prisoner sexual assault (Bowker, 1981, 1982; Pollock-Byrne, 1990). Two known studies were conducted by Cindy and Dave Struckman-Johnson in 1994 and 1998. The first study was conducted statewide in three men’s prisons and one female prison in Nebraska. The study found, via anonymous mail surveys, that 22.0% of men and 7.7% of women reported that they experienced being “pressured or forced into sexual contact in a state prison facility” (Struckman-Johnson, Struckman-Johnson, Rucker, Bumby, & Donaldson, 1996, p. 74).2 Of this number, only 29% of prisoners actually reported the incident to prison staff. A follow-up study was conducted in 1998 with 2,051 inmates and 518 staff members at seven men’s prisons and three female prison units in other mid-western states. The researchers found that the sexual coercion rates reported by female inmates (those who reported at least one incident of sexual coercion) varied among the three facilities: at 6%, 8%, and 19% (Struckman-Johnson & Struckman-Johnson, 1999, 2000). A second major finding was that between 55% and 80% of all sexual coercion in the three women’s units was committed by other women offenders, which is notably more than that committed by correctional staff.
Finch, S.M. 1973 Sexual abuse by mothers Medical Aspects of Human Sexuality 7(1), 191     Child victim, adult perp
               
Finkelhor, D. 1981 Sex between siblings: Sex play, incest and aggression Children and sex (1981): 129-149     Child victim, adult perp
               
Finkelhor, D. 1986 A Sourcebook on Child Sexual Abuse      Beverly Hills, CA: Sage Publications   Child victim, adult perp
               
Finkelhor, D. 1994 Current Information on the scope and nature of child sexual abuse.  The Future of Children 4(2), 31-53     Child victim, adult perp
               
Finkelhor, D., & Russell, D. 1984 Women as perpetrators: Review of the evidence  Child Sexual Abuse: New Theory and Research 171-187 New York: Free Press Finkelhor, D. Child victim, adult perp
“best estimates, based on a variety of surveys of the general population, put the percentage of sexual contacts by older females to be about 20% for male children and 5% for female children” p. 177.
Finkelhor, D., Hotaling, G., Lewis, I. A., & Smith, C. 1990 Sexual abuse in a national survey of adult men and women: Prevalence, characteristics, and risk factors  Child Abuse and Neglect 14(1), 19-28     Child victim, adult perp
N=1,481 women in telephone survey about their sexual victimization histories; about 1% were victimized by other women. N=1,145 men reported 17% of their perps were women.
Finkelhor, D., Mitchell, K.J., & Wolak. J. 2000 Online Victimization: A Report on the Nation's Youth [148] National Center for Missing and Exploited Children       Child victim, adult perp
               
Finkelhor, D., Williams, L. M., & Burns, N. 1988 Nursery crimes: Sexual abuse in day care      Newbury Park, CA: Sage Publications   Child victim, adult perp
looked at 271 day care center sexual abuse cases; perp was female in 40% of cases
Fintel, TR. 2007 Demonstrating the criterion-related validity of the Multiphasic sex inventory (adult female form): a comparison of adult female sex offenders and female non-sex offenders  Unpublished dissertation   University of Louisville   Assessment or treatment related
               
Fischer, G. J. 1991 Is Lesser Severity of Child Sexual Abuse a Reason More Males Report Having Liked It?  Sexual Abuse: a Journal of Research and Treatment 4(2), 131-139     Specifically on male victims
               
Fischer,G.J. 1992 Gender differences in college student sexual abuse victims and their offenders. Annals of Sex Research 4 5 215-226     Legal issues or research issues
N=796 college students completed anonymous sex survey about their histories of sexual victimization. 14% of women were abused by another female, most commonly a baby-sitter, 64% of males were abused by a female and 38% of male victims experienced incestuous abuse rather than abuse by a non-relative. 
Fisher, Nicola L., and Afroditi Pina 2012 An overview of the literature on female-perpetrated adult male sexual victimization  Aggression and Violent Behavior       Specifically on male victims
The rape of women has been an issue of concern in research literature for the past 40 years. Conversely, rape against men has only relatively recently received investigation. The current paper reviews the existing research literature regarding male rape and sexual assault, with particular emphasis on female perpetrated male sexual victimization. The review covers issues regarding biased legal definitions, rape myths, feminist theory, and stereotypical or negative beliefs; all of which create a problematic social environment for male victims of female perpetrated assault to report crimes. The review also discusses the prevalence of female perpetrated attacks against men, with evidence from self-reports by female sex offenders to highlight the existence of male sexual victimization and the aggressive manner in which the sexual activity is committed. The review concludes that male sexual victimization by women should be taken as seriously as that of women by men. Highlights ► A succinct overview of literature on female perpetrated adult sexual victimization. ► We discuss issues around the definition of rape and the use of gendered language. ► Rape myths affect recognition and reporting of male sexual victimization by females. ► Increasing acceptance and recognition of female perpetrated sexual assault. ► Need for provision of appropriate outlets and support for male victims of females.
Fisher, T. D., & Walters, A. S. 2003 Variables in addition to gender that help to explain differences in perceived sexual interest Psychology of Men & Masculinity 4(2), 154     Child victim, adult perp
               
FitzRoy, L. 1995 Mother/Rapist: Women’s experience of child sexual assault perpetrated by their biological or adoptive mothers unpublished Masters Thesis   La Trobe University, Melbourne   Child victim, adult perp
               
FitzRoy, L. 1997 Mother/daughter rape: A challenge for feminism  Women’s encounters with violence: Australian experiences 40-54 Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage S. Cook & J. Bessant Child victim, adult perp
               
FitzRoy, L. 1998 Offending Mothers: Theorizing in a Feminist Minefield      SECASA, Australia   Child victim, adult perp
               
FitzRoy, L. 1998 Offending Women: Conversations with Workers      SECASA, Australia   Child victim, adult perp
               
FitzRoy, L. 2005 Violent Women?: An explorative study of women's use of violence  Unpublished Doctoral Thesis   La Trobe Univeristy, Melbourne   Child victim, adult perp
               
Flinck, A., & Paavilainen, E. 2010 Women's Experiences of Their Violent Behavior in an Intimate Partner Relationship  Qualitative Health Research 20(3), 306-318     Adult victim, adult perp
               
Flowers, R. B. 1995 Female Crime, Criminals, and Cellmates: An Exploration of Female Criminality and Delinquency      Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Co.   Adult victim, adult perp
Pages 96-100 on Mother-child incest (estimates 2% of all incest) then focuses on mothers who tolerate sexual victimization of the child by others.
Forbes, J. 1992 Female sexual abusers: The contemporary search for equivalence  Practice 6, 102-111     Child victim, adult perp
               
Ford, H. 2006 Women who sexually abuse children      Chichester, UK: John Wiley & Sons   Child victim, adult perp
               
Ford, H., & Corton, F. 1997 Sexual Deviance in Females: Assessment & Treatment  Sexual Deviance: Theory, Assessment, and Treatment 486-507 New York: The Guilford Press D. R. Laws & W. T. Donohue Assessment or treatment related
               
Ford, T. M., Liwag-McLamb, M. G., & Foley, L. A. 1998 Perceptions of rape based on sex and sexual orientation of victim Journal of Social Behavior & Personality       Child victim, adult perp
N-108 college students, vignette of rape, victim’s sex and sexual orientation varied. Female victims were viewed as having more responsibility of they were heterosexual and raped by a male (suggesting the ‘just world’ myth was at work). Male victims were viewed as more responsible if they were homosexual and raped by a male
Forke CM, Myers, RK, Catallozzi M & Schwarz DF 2008 Relationship violence among female and male college undergraduate students  Archives of Pediatric & Adolescent Medicine 162 (7) 634-641     Child victim, adult perp
N=910 college students, 27.2% males reported victimization. 11.3% of males reported a history of physical victimization, 13.9% reported a history of sexual victimization, 19% reported a history of emotional victimization. 19.4% of the women reported a history of perpetrating physical violence, 1.8% reported a history of sexual violence perpetration & 7.3% admitted to perpetrating emotional abuse. Most offences were by/against a partner.
Fortenberry, J. Dennis & Robert F. Hill 1986 Sister-sister incest as a manifestation of multigenerational sexual abuse Journal of Adolescent Health Care 7, 3, 1986, 202–204     Child/adolescent perp
               
Forward,S & Buck, C. 1988 Betrayal of Innocence Incest and its Devastation   Penguin Books   Legal issues or research issues
 
Fowler, Carol,, Burns, S. R., & Roehl, J. E. 1983 Counseling the incest offender International journal of family therapy 5(2), 92-97     Child victim, adult perp
Noted that 80% of the incest offender in their study had been physically or sexually abused as children.
Franklin C.A., & Fearn, N.E. 2008 Gender race, and formal court decision-making outcomes: Chivalry/paternalism, conflict theory or gender conflict? Journal of Criminal Justice 36(3), 279-290     Legal issues or research issues
White females are viewed as more amenable to treatmentthan non-white females.
Freedner,N., Freed,L.H.,yang,Y.W.,&Austin, S.B. 2002 Dating violence among gay,lesbian,and bisexual adolescents: Results from a community survey. Journal of Adolescent Health  31(6), 469-474     Legal issues or research issues
.  N=521 GBL adolescents filled out self-report survey at a rally. Found that 14.5-21.9% of the non-heterosexual females reported sexual victimization by an inmate partner.
Freel, M. 1995 Women Who Sexually Abuse Children  Norwich: Social Work Monographs   University of East Anglia   Child victim, adult perp
Used self-report questionnaire, N=183 childcare workers from UK (92 female, 91 male). 4% of female workers reported sexual interest in children, 2% of women answered anything other than negative (unsure to strongly agree) to the question “I would have sex with a child if it was certain no one would find out and there would be no punishment”
Freel, M. 2003 Child Sexual Abuse and the Male Monopoly: An Empirical Exploration of Gender and a Sexual Interest in Children  British Journal of Social Work 33, 481-498     Child victim, adult perp
               
Freeman, N. J., Sandler, J. C. 2007 Female and Male Sex Offenders: A Comparison of Recidivism Patterns and Risk Factors  Journal of Interpersonal Violence 23, 1394-1413     Child victim, adult perp
               
Frei, A. 2007 Media considerations of female sex offenders: a content analysis of US new paper reporting from 1975-2006 Paper presented at the annual meeting   AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CRIMINOLOGY, Atlanta Marriott Marquis, Atlanta, Georgia   Child victim, adult perp
               
Frei,A. 2008 Media consideration of sex offenders: How community response shapes a gendered perspective International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparitive Criminology 52, 495-498     Legal issues or research issues
Media portrayal of female offenders often focuses on emotionally fragile" teacher-lover situations, which represent a small proportion of actual female sex offender cases
French,B.H., Tilghman, J.D. & Malebranche, D.A. 2014 Seuxal coercion context and psychosocial correlates among diverse males Psychology of Men & Masculinity 1642-53 42-53     Specifically on male victims
N=284 diverse high school & college males from Midwest, ages 14-26. 43% experienced sexual coercion; 31% experienced verbal coercion, 18% experienced physical coercion.  95% reported the perpetrator was female. Consequences include greater sexual risk taking, alcohol use and psychological distress.  
Freund, K., Heasman, G., Racansky, I. G., & Glancy, G. 1984 Pedophilia and heterosexuality vs. homosexuality  Journal of Sex & Marital Therapy 10(3), 193-200     Out-dated, erroneous, etc.
note - 'pedophilia...does not exist at all in women' p.193
Frey, L.L. 2006 Girls don’t do that, do they? Adolescent females who sexually abuse.  Current perspectives: Working with sexually aggressive youth and youth with sexual behavior problems 255-272 Holyoke, MA: NEARI Press R. E. Longo & D. S. Prescott Child/adolescent perp
               
Frieden, J. (2003, November Female sexual abuse of boys often goes unreported  Clinical Psychiatry News ‘1-5     Specifically on male victims
               
Friedman,S.H 2015 Realistic Consideration of Women and Violence is Critical Journal of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law Online.  43(3), 273-276     Legal issues or research issues
Noted that women are responsible for 15-20% of child sexual victimization but are under-represented in prisons for this due to socio-cultural misconceptions, notes that most treatment programs assume the perp is male.
Fritz, G. S., Stoll, K. & Wagner, N. N. 1981 A comparison of males and females who were sexually molested as children  Journal of Sex & Marital Therapy 7(1), 54-59     Child victim, adult perp
               
Frketic, Kristina & Easteal, Patricia L 2010 Public Perception of Teachers’ sexual misconduct: does the sex of the teacher make a difference? Alternative Law Journal 35 (3), 2010, pp142-146     Child victim, adult perp
Found evidence of gendered views about sexual misconduct. There is increased likelihood that the conduct is regarded as more serious if the student is female, given a perception that the female experiences more negative impacts. Greater blame is placed on a male teacher who has a sexual relationship with a female student
Fromuth, M. E., & Burkhart, B. R. 1989 Long-term psychological correlates of childhood sexual abuse in two samples of college men  Child Abuse and Neglect 13(4), 533-542     Specifically on male victims
               
Fromuth, M. E., & Conn, V. E. 1997 Hidden perpetrators; Sexual molestation in a non-clinical sample of college women  Journal of Interpersonal Violence 12(3), 456-465     Adult victim, adult perp
N=546 female college students, 22 committed 1 or more acts of child sexual abuse, mostly before age of 14, mostly with only 1 victim, 2 used force (9%), 4 used bribes (18%; grooming), none were reported to police. 4 of the women admitted to having fantasized about children (18% deviant sexual arousal). Average victim age was 7 years, many victims were related (siblings, cousins). 86% did not view their behavior as abusive, 66% did not think their behavior had a negative effect on the victim.
Fromuth, M. E., & Holt, A. R. 2008 Perception of teacher sexual misconduct by age of student  Journal of Child Sexual Abuse 17(2), 163-179     Child victim, adult perp
               
Fromuth, Mary Ellen, Aimee Holt, and April L. Parker 2002 Factors affecting college students' perceptions of sexual relationships between high school students and teachers Journal of Child sexual abuse 10, no. 3 (2002): 59-73     Legal issues or research issues
The male teacher/female student combination was viewed more negatively than the female teacher/male student pairing
Fuchs, Siegmund Fred 2004 Male sexual assault: issues of arousal and consent  Cleveland State Law Review 51 (2004): 93     Specifically on male victims
               
Gabbard, G. O., & Twemlow, S. W. 1994 The role of mother-son incest in the pathogenesis of narcissistic personality disorder Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association 42(1), 171-189     Child victim, adult perp
               
Gabbard, G. O., Twemlow, S. W. 1994 The Role of Mother-Son Incest in The Pathogenesis of Narcissistic Personality Disorder  Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association 42(1), 171-189     Child victim, adult perp
               
Gaes. Gerald G. and Andrew L. Goldberg 38056 Prison Rape: A Critical Review of the Literature National Institute of Justice          Child victim, adult perp
Studies Involving Primarily Men, or Men and Women. Studies by Struckman-Johnson, Struckman-Johnson, Rucker, Bumby, and Donaldson (1996), Struckman-Johnson and Struckman-Johnson (2000), Davis (1968), Nacci and Kane (1982, 1983, 1984), Saum, Surratt, Inciardi, and Bennet (1995), Tewksbury (1989), Maitland and Sluder (1998), Wooden and Parker (1982), Lockwood (1980), Toch (1977), Hensley, Tewksbury, and Castle (2003), Carroll (1977), Chonco (1989), Moss, Hosford, and Anderson (1979), Butler, Donovan, Levy, and Kaldor (2002), Fuller and Orsagh (1977), Butler and Milner (2003), Forst, Fagan, and Vivona (1989), and the Bureau of Justice Statistics (1997) reported on primarily male samples, or a combination of female and male samples. The Butler and Milner and Butler et al., studies were conducted as part of a larger health assessment in the prison system in New South Wales, Australia. Details of each of these studies are covered in the full report. Studies Involving Exclusively Women – Coerced Sex among Women. Struckman-Johnson and Struckman-Johnson (2002), and Alarid (2000) reported on exclusively female samples. These studies are reviewed in detail in the full report. There is also a great deal of research on consensual sex among women that is mentioned, but not reviewed in the report. The Problem of Validity. Unlike some other assessments of sensitive and stigmatized behaviors such as sexual practices and legal abortions, there is no way to directly measure the veracity of the self-reported prison sexual victimization. We propose two models that use other information about drug use, the level of blood borne infectious disease, and the level of sexual victimization to try to establish the validity of the data at the individual or institution level, after a large scale survey has been conducted. This method will not provide an independent validity check on the actual proportion of sexual victimization. It will, however, provide some assurance that the relative ranking of prisons, from best to worst, has some validity.
Gakhal, B.K. and Brown, S.J. 2011 A Comparison of the general public's, forensic professionals' and students' attitudes towards female sex offenders  Journal of sexual aggression volume 17 (1): 105-116     Child victim, adult perp
               
Gallagher, B. 2000 The extent and nature of known cases of institutional child sexual abuse.  British Journal of Social Work 30(6), 795-817     Child victim, adult perp
               
Gallop, R. 1998 Abuse of power in the nurse-client relationship  Nursing Standard 12(37), 43-47     Child victim, adult perp
               
Gamez-Guadix, M., & Straus, M. 2009 Childhood and adolescent victimization and sexual coercion and assault by male and female university students. ID91 - PR91- Victimization Sexual Coercion - Gamez S.pdf Family Research Laboratory   University of New Hampshire, Dunham, NH 03824   Adult victim, adult perp
N= 13,877 students at 68 universities in 32 nations. 19/6% of females self reported using verbal coercion tactics for sex.
Gannon, T. 2010 A re-examination of female child molesters' implicit theories: evidence of female specificity?  Psychology, Crime & Law       Child victim, adult perp
               
Gannon, T. A., & Cortoni, F. 2010 Female Sexual Offenders: Theory, Assessment and Treatment      Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell   Child victim, adult perp
               
Gannon, T. A., & Rose, M. R. 2008 Female child sexual offenders: Towards, integrating theory and practice  Aggression and Violent behaviour 21, 194-207     Child victim, adult perp
               
Gannon, T. A., & Rose, M. R. 2009 Offense-Related Interpretative Bias in Female Child Molesters: A Preliminary Study  Sexual Abuse: A Journal of Research and Treatment 21, 194-207     Child victim, adult perp
N=19 British F.S.O.s compared to 18 British non-sexual female offenders. F.S.O.s were more likely than controls to view males as threatening, regardless of whether they offended with a male partner or not. (Need to find other research on this phenomenon of women viewing ambiguous info on males in a way that interprets males as dangerous—is it the corollary to the male propensity to view women’s ambiguous behaviour as sexual?)
Gannon, T. A., & Rose, M. R., & Ward, T. 2008 A descriptive model of the offence process for female sexual offenders  Sexual Abuse: A Journal of Research and Treatment 20, 352-374     Child victim, adult perp
N=22 female sexual offenders, had a total of 38 victims (13 male, 25 female victims; 9 adult victims & 29 child victims). 47% of the victims were relatives. 50% of the women offended with a male partner (only 23% were ‘coerced’), 27% offended alone and 23% as part of a group of 3 or more people.
Gannon, T. A., Hoare, J. A., Rose, M. R., & Parrett, N. 2012 A re-examination of female child molesters’ implicit theories: evidence of female specificity? Psychology, Crime & Law 18(2), 209-224     Child victim, adult perp
N=16 British F.S.O.s, had offense supportive cognitive distortions including Uncontrolability, Males as Dangerous, Victims as Sexual, Males as Harmful and Males as Entitled (factors help women co-offend with males)
Gannon, T. A., Rose, M. R., & Ward, T. in press Pathways to female sexual offending: A preliminary study  Psychology Crime and Law       Child victim, adult perp
               
Gannon, T. A., Rose, M. R., & Williams, S. E. 2009 Do female child molesters hold implicit associations between children and sex? A preliminary investigation Journal of Sexual Aggression 15, 55-61     Child victim, adult perp
N=17 British F.S.O.s weren’t any more likely than British female non-sexual offenders to associated kids with sex
Gannon, T.A. & Alleyne, E. 2013 Female Sexual Abusers’ Cognition: A Systematic Review Trauma Violence & Abuse 14 (1) 67-79     Child victim, adult perp
               
Gannon, T.A., Waugh, G.; Taylor, K.; Blanchette, K.; O'Connor, A., Blake, E. & Ó’ Ciardha, C. 2013 Women who Sexually Offend Display Three Main Offense Styles: A Re-Examination of the Descriptive Model of Female Sexual Offending  Sex Abuse May       Child victim, adult perp
This study examined a theory constructed to describe the offense process of women who sexually offend—the Descriptive Model of Female Sexual Offending (DMFSO). In particular, this report sets out to establish whether the original three pathways (or offending styles) identified within United Kingdom convicted female sexual offenders and described within the DMFSO (i.e., Explicit-Approach, Directed-Avoidant, Implicit-Disorganized) were applicable to a small sample (N = 36) of North American women convicted of sexual offending. Two independent raters examined the offense narratives of the sample and—using the DMFSO—coded each script according to whether it fitted one of the three original pathways. Results suggested that the three existing pathways of the DMFSO represented a reasonable description of offense pathways for a sample of North American women convicted of sexual offending. No new pathways were identified. A new “Offense Pathway Checklist” devised.
Garnefski, N., & Arends, E. 1998 Sexual abuse and adolescent maladjustment: Differences between male and female victims Journal of Adolescence 21, 99–107.     Child victim, adult perp
               
Garnefski,N., Diekstra,R.F.W., & Heus,P.D. 1992 A population-based survey of he characteristics of high school students with and without a history of suicidal behavior. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica 86(3), 189-196     Legal issues or research issues
 
Gavin, H. 2009 Mummy wouldn’t do that the perception and construction of the female child sex abuser. Evil, Women and the Feminine 1-3 May 2009 Budapest, Hungary.   Child victim, adult perp
               
Gibb, T. W. 1894 Indecent assault upon children  A system of legal medicine 649-657 New York: E.B. Treat A. M. Hamilton & L. Godkin Out-dated, erroneous, etc.
               
Gibson, Camille, and Donna M. Vandiver 2008 Juvenile Sex Offenders: What the Public Needs to Know     Greenwood Publishing Group   Child victim, adult perp
               
Giguere, R., & Bumby, K. 2007 Female sex offenders [189] Center for Sex Offender Management   USA   Child victim, adult perp
Women account for 1% of incarcerated sex offenders in the U.S.
Gil,S 2014 Male Victims of Childhood Sexual Abuse by a Male or Female Perpetrator  Journal of Traumatic Stress Disorders and Treatment 3,3.2     Specifically on male victims
N=58 male survivors of sexual abuse by male perps, N=39 survivors of sexual abuse by female perps.   Victims were abused by male perps as a significantly younger age than by female perps which may account for the higher rate of psychiatric diagnosis in the victims of male perps.  The victims of female perps had high amounts of fear of merger and fear of abandonment as well as high amounts of extraversion and agreeableness, which might reflect a coping strategy.  Their perpetrators were mostly biological mothers or stepmothers. 
Gilgun,Jane 2010 What child sexual abuse means to a women and girl perpetrators         Legal issues or research issues
 
Gill,M., & Tutty, L.M. 1998 Sexual identity issues for male survivors of childhood sexual abuse: A qualitive study. Journal of Child Sexual Abuse 6(3) 31-47     Specifically on male victims
N=10 males (ages 27-50) who had history of sexual victimization as children, 1 by a female and 5 by female and male perps. 
Gillespie,S.M., Williams,R., Elliott,I.A., Eldridge, H.J., Ashfield,S., &Beech,A.R. 2015 Characteristics of females who sexually offend: A comparision of solo and co-offenders Sexual Abuse: A Journal of Research and Treatment 27 284-301 doi: 10.1177/1079063214556358     Assessment or treatment related
Compared British solo FSOs to FSO's with co-offenders (N=20 each group), included contact and non-contact offenders. Assessed for presence/absence of offense supportive cognitions, presence of (self-reported) negative developmental factors, self-regulation, association with antisocial peers, offense history, sexual dis-satisfaction, abusive fantasies, intimacy and power needs, treatment readiness, etc.  Solo offenders were more likely to go to criminal court compared to Co-offenders. In terms of the ratio of contact to non-contact offenses, Solo offenders had far fewer non-contact offenses; 75% contact offenses and 15% non-contact offenses; Co-offenders had 60 % contact offenses and 40% non-contact offenses (facilitating, aiding/abetting, making and distributing child porn).  In terms of relationship with victims, Solos were more likely to have an extra-familial victim (60%:40%) while Co-offenders were more likely to have an intra-familial victim (85%:15%).   10% of FSO Co-offenders had a female partner (either single female co-offender or both a female and a male co-offender).  Not all Co-offenders were romantic partners; 5% were an acquaintance and 5% were strangers.    Found no difference between the Solo and Co-offending groups for developmental issues (self-reported histories of abuse, etc.) or for psychological dispositions (offense supportive beliefs, etc.).  Found that Solo offenders scored higher in measures of sexual dis-satisfaction, denial of current offense and other personal/ environmental factors. Also found that Solo offenders scored higher in measure of Offense Preceding factors, including abusive fantasies, greater need for intimacy, greater need for power/dominance and higher levels of planning.  Co-Offenders scored higher in measure of being involved with sexual offenders.  Also found that Solo offenders had higher scores on treatment supportive factors subscale.  The two types of offenders did not differ in terms of holding offense supportive beliefs and thoughts (children are sexual beings who aren't harmed by sex with adult, etc.).  Authors suggested that treatment of Solo FSOs should include looking at pre-offense issues like sexual dissatisfaction, denial, abusive fantasies, needs for intimacy/power, while Co-offending FSOs may need more focus on their involvement with known offenders. 
Girshick, L. B. 2002 Woman-to-Woman Sexual Violence: Does She Call It Rape?      Boston, MA: Northeastern University Press.   Adult victim, adult perp
               
Glasser, M., Kolvin, L., Campbell, D., Glasser, A., Leitch, I & Farrelly, S. 2001 Cycle of child sexual abuse; links between being a victim and becoming a perpetrator, [192] British Journal of Psychiatry 179, 482-494     Child victim, adult perp
A high percentage of male subjects abused in childhood by a female relative became perpetrators.
Glasser,M., Kolvin,L.,, Campbell,D., Glasser,A.,Leitch, I & Farrelly,S. 2001 Cycle of child sexual abuse; lins between being a victim and becoming a perpetrator  British Journal of Psychiatry   179, 482-494     Legal issues or research issues
A high percentage of male subjects abused in childhood by a female relative became perpetrators
Glick, P., & Fiske, S. T. 1999 The ambivalence toward men inventory Psychology of Women Quarterly 23(3), 519-536.     Child victim, adult perp
We present a measure, the Ambivalence toward Men Inventory (AMI), that differentiates between women's hostile and benevolent prejudices and stereotypes about men. The Hostility toward Men (HM) and Benevolence toward Men (BM) subscales of the AMI tap conventional attitudes toward men that have opposing valences. Each subscale assesses sub-factors concerning men's power, gender differentiation, and heterosexuality. Three studies with predominately White, male and female participants (two with undergraduates and one with a community sample) establish the factor structure, reliability, convergent validity, and predictive validity of the AMI. The AMI was strongly related to its sister scale, the Ambivalent Sexism Inventory (Glick & Fiske, 1996) and to two established scales of attitudes toward men (Downs & Engleson, 1982; Iazzo, 1983). Only the AMI, however, successfully distinguished between subjectively positive and subjectively negative beliefs about men. A copy of the 20-item AMI is provided as a tool for further exploration of women's ambivalence toward men.
Goldberg Edelson, Meredyth 2012 Why Have All the Boys Gone? Gender Differences in Prosecution Acceptance of Child Sexual Abuse Cases Sexual Abuse: A Journal of Research and Treatment 25(5) 461– 481     Child victim, adult perp
Notes that Child Sexual Abuse cases referred by the police to the DA are not necessarily accepted for prosecution and there appears to be gender differences related to this. Author compared acceptance rates of DA to expected frequencies based on available literature on abuse and on data from Child Abuse Assessment Center. The final combined sample included 172 children, 137 females and 34 males, average age 9.5 yrs. Found that the ratio of male/female victim cases accepted by the DA didn’t match the base rate of the literature or the referrals coming out of the Child Abuse Assessment Center; there were fewer male victim cases than expected; male cases of child sexual abuse were less likely than female cases to be taken up for prosecution by the DA’s office. Wasn’t due to the males being too young to testify (9 .7 yrs vs 8.5 yrs).
Goldman, L. L. 1993 Female Sex Offenders: Societal Avoidance of Comprehending the Phenomenon of Women Who Sexually Abuse Children Unpublished Ph.D. dissertation   Massachusetts School of Professional Psychology. (University Microfilms, Ann Arbor, MI)   Child victim, adult perp
               
Goodman, D. 1976 The Behavior of Hypersexual Delinquent Girls  American Journal of Psychiatry 133(6), 663     Child victim, adult perp
               
Goodwin, J., & DiVasto, P. 1979 Mother-daughter incest Child Abuse & Neglect 3, 953-957     Child victim, adult perp
               
Goodwin, J., & DiVasto, P. 1989 Female homosexuality: A sequel to mother-daughter incest  Sexual Abuse: Incest Victims and Their Families 140-146   J. M. Goodwin Child victim, adult perp
Chicago: Year Book Medical Publishers, Inc.
Grabell, A. S., & Knight, R. A. 2009 Examining childhood abuse patterns and sensitive periods in juvenile sexual offenders Sexual Abuse: A Journal of Research and Treatment 21(2), 208-222     Child victim, adult perp
In adult sexual offenders, studies have found that the relation of sexual abuse to sexual coercion is mediated by sexually related deviant cognitions. In this study it is hypothesized that this link will be found in juvenile sexual offenders when their sexual abuse history is stratified into discrete developmental epochs. It is further hypothesized that the age range of 3 to 7 years, when children rapidly acquire inhibition and cognitive flexibility skills, will be the most potent predictor. A sample of 193 juvenile sexual offenders is used to examine whether sexual abuse specifically in this discrete period, as opposed to other periods, predicts subsequent sexual fantasy. The results confirm that sexual abuse correlates with later adolescent sexual fantasy only during the 3- to 7-year epoch. This study should be replicated with female offenders.
Graham, A. 2007 Simply sexual: The discrepancy in treatment between male and female sex offenders [196] Whittier Journal of Child & Family Advocacy 0, 145     Legal issues or research issues
               
Graham, Ruth 2006 Male rape and the careful construction of the male victim  Social & Legal Studies 15 (2) 2006: 187-208     Specifically on male victims
               
Grattagliano, Ignazio, Jessica N. Owens, Robert J. Morton, Carlo P. Campobasso, Felice Carabellese, and Roberto Catanesi. 2012 Female sexual offenders: Five Italian case studies Aggression and Violent Behavior 17, no. 3 (2012): 180-187     Child victim, adult perp
               
Gray, A., Busconi, A., Houchens, P. & Pithers, W. D. 1997 Children with sexual behavior problems and their caregivers: Demographics, functioning, and clinical patterns Sexual Abuse: A Journal of Research and Treatment 9(4), 267-90     Child/adolescent perp
               
Gray, J. L. 1992 From the Data of Therapists: An Exploratory Study of Adult Females Who Sexually Molest Children Unpublished MSW thesis   Long Beach, CA: California State University   Child victim, adult perp
               
Grayson,J 1989 Female sex offenders Virginia Child Protection Newsletter 28(1), 5-8     Legal issues or research issues
Notes serious under-reporting, notes that F.S.O.s are different from M.S.O. in that they are more likely to be related to their victims.  Recommends assertiveness training as part of treatment. 
Grayston, A. D., & De Luca, R. V. 1999 Female perpetrators of child sexual abuse: A review of the clinical and empirical literature.  Aggression and Violent Behavior 4(1), 1999, 93-106     Child victim, adult perp
               
Green, A. H. 1999 Female sex offenders  Sexual Aggression 195-210 Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Press J. A. Shaw Child victim, adult perp
victim surveys show that between 14% and 24% of sexually abused males and between 6% and 14% of sexually abused females report having been abused by a female perpetrator.
Green, A.H., & Kaplan, M. 1994 Psychiatric impairment and childhood victimization experiences in female child molesters.  Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry 33, 954-961     Child victim, adult perp
               
Green, J. 2000 Maire Claire on Female Sex Offenders      Retrieved June 16, 2010, from Abuse Hurts Everyone   Child victim, adult perp
               
Greenfeld, L. A., & Snell, T. L. 1999 Women offenders   3 Washington, DC: US Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Bureau of Justice Statistics.   Child victim, adult perp
Per self-reports of victims, women perpetrate 14% of violent offenses (average annual: 2.1 million violent female offenders). 75% of their victims were other females, most of whom had a prior relationship with the perp (not a stranger). About 10,000 females are arrested in the U.S. annually for violent sexual offenses.
Greer,A.E. & Buss D.M. 1994 Tactics for promoting sexual encounters.  Journal of Sex Research 31(3), 185-201     Legal issues or research issues
Women have access to a variety of high pressure tactics for sex.
Grier, P. E., & Clark, M. A. 1987 Female sexual offenders in a prison setting Unpublished, manuscript   St. Louis, MO: Behavioral Sciences Institute, Inc.   Child victim, adult perp
               
Grier, P. E., Clark, M., & Stoner, S. B. 1993 Comparative study of personality traits of female sex offenders.  Psychological Reports 73, 1378     Child victim, adult perp
               
Grier,P.E, & Cark, M.A. 1987 Female sexual offenders in a prison setting Unpublished manuscript    St Louis, MO Behavioral Science Institute Inc   Legal issues or research issues
 
Griffith, S.R  2013 Men's Stories of Unwanted Sexual and Pornography Experiences: A Qualitative Analysis  Doctoral Dissertation Wheaton College       Specifically on male victims
Used Online Survey with N=590 male college students to ask about unwanted sexual experiences (kissing'intercourse), disclosure and unwanted exposure to porn.  17% had unwanted sexual experience history, 64% of those had disclosed it, 13% had unwanted exposure to porn. Situations ranged from childhood molestation, adult sexual assault and also 'silent reluctance' to say no.  Masculine sexual scripts were found to play a role. Noted that the constant questioning of whether men can have unwanted sexual experiences discredits that victimization and may be part of the shifting of blame onto male victims; since he was male, he could have physically stopped it if he really wanted to stop it.
Grimaldi, Jessica 2009 Sexual Scripts and Structured Action: Exploring Gendered Language in Cases of Female Sexual Offending Masters thesis   Queen’s University Kingston, Ontario, Canada   Child victim, adult perp
Three criminal cases are examined from Wisconsin, U.S. The goal is to examine whether, and through what processes, traditional sexual scripts are discursively reproduced in court proceedings and media reporting of female sexual offending. State of Wisconsin vs. Anne Knopf was discussed as ‘unusual case’, ‘harmless’, ‘good mother’, ‘mentally ill’. State of Wisconsin vs. Marnie Staehly Case was discussed as ‘unusual case’, ‘harmless’, ‘mental impairment’, ‘childlike’, ‘non-sexual’. USA vs. Carrie Wheaton and Roger Smith child porn case was discussed as unusual case’, “mentally ill’, ‘coercion’ and ‘non-maternal’.
Grob, C. S. 1985 Single case study: Female exhibitionism  The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease 173(4), 253-256     Child victim, adult perp
               
Grossin, Cécile, Isabelle Sibille, Geoffroy Lorin de la Grandmaison, Ahmed Banasr, Fabrice Brion, and Michel Durigon 2003 Analysis of 418 cases of sexual assault Forensic Science International 131, no. 2 (2003): 125-130     Child victim, adult perp
14% of the 418 victims were male
Grossman , L. 1992 An example of "character perversion" in a woman  Psychoanalytic Quarterly 61(4), 581-9.     Child victim, adult perp
               
Groth, A. N. 1979 Sexual Trauma in the Life Histories of Rapists and Child Molesters  Victimology 4(1), 10-16     Child victim, adult perp
               
Groth, A. N. 2001 Men who rape: The psychology of the offender   185-192 Da Capo Press   Child victim, adult perp
Briefly discusses female sexual offenders
Groth, A.N. Groth, A. N. 1982 The incest offender Handbook of clinical intervention in child sexual abuse 215-239   Sgroi, S. M. Child victim, adult perp
Has a single page on mother-child incest.
Gutwoski,Christy 2003 "Is he less a victim? Teen who says he was raped by Library aide says he's been ostracized because he's male."      Chicago Daily Herald 9/21/03   Specifically on male victims
 
Halcyon, Linda, Robert W. Blum, Trish Beuhring, Ernest Pate, Sheila Campbell-Forrester, and Anneke Venema. 2003 Adolescent health in the Caribbean: a regional portrait Journal Information 93, no. 11     Child victim, adult perp
31% of the males reported having been forced into their first sexual intercourse. Over 50% of the sexually active boys reported their first sexual intercourse was at or before age 10 years.
Hamilton, C. E., Falshaw, L., & Browne, K. D. 2002 The link between recurrent maltreatment and offending behaviour International journal of offender therapy and comparative criminology 46(1), 75-94     Child victim, adult perp
               
Hannon, R., Hall, D. S., Nash, H., Forman, J., & Hopson, T. 2000 Judgments regarding sexual aggression as a function of sex of aggressor and victim.  Sex Roles: A Journal of Research 43(5-6), 311-322     Child victim, adult perp
               
Hanson, R. F., Resnick, H. S., Saunders, B. E., Kilpatrick, D. G., & Best, C. 1999 Factors related to the reporting of childhood rape Child Abuse & Neglect 23, 559–569     Child victim, adult perp
               
Harper, J. F. 1993 Prepubteral male victims of incest: A clinical study Child Abuse & Neglect 17(3), 419-421     Specifically on male victims
               
Harrison, H. 1994 Female abusers - what children and young people have told Childline.  Female Sexual Abuse of Children 89-92 New York: The Guilford Press M. Elliott Child victim, adult perp
               
Harrison, K. 2010 Managing High-Risk Sex Offenders in the Community: Risk Management, Treatment and Social Responsibility.      Portland, OR: Willan Publishing   Child victim, adult perp
               
Hart, R., & Dumasia, S. 2012 Treating a female convicted of sexual offending against a child while in company of a male co-offender Sexual Abuse in Australia and New Zealand 4(2), 13     Child victim, adult perp
case study
Hartwick, C., Desmarais, S., & Henning, K. 2007 Characteristics of male and female victims of sexual coercion  Canadian Journal of Human Sexuality 16(1/2), 31     Child victim, adult perp
N=251 college males. 38.8% of the males reported a history of experiencing sexual coercion and it was associated with the number of sexual partners, number of romantic relationships. 23.3% coerced into fondling/kissing, 18.3% coerced into intercourse and 5.8% coerced into oral sex.
Hassan,Mona 2014 Patterns of sexual abuse among children who received care in an emergency department in a Midwestern city Doctoral dissertation Case Western Reserve University       Legal issues or research issues
Used convenience sample of N-95 children ages 6-14 at ER from 2006-2010. 14% of the victims were male, 3.2% of the perpetrators were female. 
Hassett-Walker, C., Lateano, T., & Di Benedetto, M. 2014 Do Female Sex Offenders Receive Preferential Treatment in Criminal Charging and Sentencing? Justice System Journal 35(1), 62-86     Child victim, adult perp
Results showed that female sex offenders who victimized adolescents for whom they were not caretakers were charged less severely.
Hatchard, C. 2002 Female Perpetrated Sexual Abuse: Redefining the Construct of Sexual Abuse and Challenging Beliefs about Human Sexuality.          Child victim, adult perp
16 June 2010.
Haydon, Abigail A; Annie-Laurie McRee, & Carolyn Tucker Halpern 2011 Unwanted Sex Among Young Adults in the United States The Role of Physical Disability and Cognitive Performance Journal of Interpersonal Violence November 2011 26 (17) 3476-3493     Child victim, adult perp
This study examined associations between unwanted sexual experiences and both physical disability and cognitive performance in a nationally representative sample of young adults. We used data from 11,878 participants (ages 26-32) in Waves I, III, and IV of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health). Logistic regressions determined associations between physical disability and level of cognitive performance (using a modified Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test) and the odds of experiencing physically forced and non-physically coerced sex. Approximately 24% of females and 4% of males reported unwanted sexual experiences. Compared to respondents without disabilities, females with a physical disability had greater odds of experiencing forced sex (OR = 1.49; 95% CI [1.06, 2.08]), whereas males with a physical disability had greater odds of coerced sex (OR = 1.90; 95% CI [1.02, 3.52]). Compared to those with average cognitive performance scores, females with scores above 110 had slightly higher odds of coerced sex (OR = 1.20; 95% CI [1.03-1.41]). Further research on pathways underlying these associations is needed to inform prevention efforts.
Hayes, S., & Carpenter, B. 2013 Social moralities and discursive constructions of female sex offenders Sexualities 16(1-2) 159-179     Legal issues or research issues
Analyzes the way the issue of child sexual abuse by women is created via public discussion.  In late 20th Century, the focus was on male (non-familial) perps and female victims.  MSO behavior was seen as existing on the continuum of normal male behavior (males are hypersexual and have difficulty controlling themselves).  This way of framing the discussion forces women in to the narrow frame of being the Non-Sex Offender (passive, non-sexual, nurturing).  Women who engage in sexual offending against minors were framed as emotionally dependent upon their coercive male partners, leaving the males in control.  If the FSO worked solo, then the behavior was due to their own abuse history.  Only recently has there been a more full discussion of the idea of women committing sexual offenses of their own volition but the discussion remains oversimplified and gendered.  The women are either Evil and having betrayed the trust of the world by not being inherently nurturing to children or are Mad/Insane because she had her natural nurturance of children removed by her own abuse.   Had she not been abused, she never would have committed the sexual offenses.   If the victim is past puberty but not yet of age to consent and male, then the issue is constructed differently, with the victim described as 'lucky' (something never used with female victims) and the woman seen as more sad/pathetic than malicious.  Females can't be predatory as that would de-masculinize the male victim and would position female as having sexual desire in a world where women are not seen as having their own sexual subjectivity. Authors note that sex ed for females only teaches them about dealing with the issues related to being a receptacle of male sexuality (pregnancy/contraception) rather than any discussion of desire by the female.  Also discusses Australian laws related to age of consent for sex. 
Hayes,S., & Baker,B 2014 Female Sex Offenders and Pariah Femininities: Rewriting the Sexual Scripts Journal of Criminology       Legal issues or research issues
The article analyzed the way UK & Australia media reports (487 reports 2000-2010) on sexual offending in a way that reinforce traditional gender norms and 'hinders' the development of awareness of FSO's.  Notes that pedophiles are viewed as having both deviant sexual interest and exercise of power over others (children), which is very different from the way women are viewed.  Notes that women must be viewed as offending because of previous trauma or other external pressure in order to maintain myth that women are safe nurturers and sexual gatekeepers.   Divided articles up between those that mentioned prepubescent victims (<11 yrs) versus those that noted pubescent victims (>12 yrs).  41 FSO's were identified with prepubescent victims and 74 for pubescent victims.  Perp ages ranged from 19-62 yrs.  Most of the FSO's who victimized prepubescent victims were discussed as the accomplice of a manipulative male.  The FSOs were discussed in language that fit 6 themes including minimization/mitigation (she is a victim, emotionally dependent on a male and not responsible for her behavior), sensationalism (voyeuristic style information), demonizing (posed as male, is lesbian or bisexual), pathologizing (PTSD, substance abuse, depression), romanticizing (used terms like 'seduced', 'lover') and women as nurturing (FSO also a mother). 
Hayes,Sharon L, & Carpenter,Belinda J 2010 Absence of malice: constructiong the female sex offender.  In Moral Panics in the Contemporary World 10-12 December 2010 Brunel University, London UK   Legal issues or research issues
 
Hearn, Jeff, Andersson, Kjerstin and Cowburn, Malcolm 2007 Background Paper on Guidelines for Researchers on Doing Research with Perpetrators of Sexual Violence. Project Report. Sexual Violence Research Initiative       Legal issues or research issues
               
Helweg-Larsen, K., & Larsen, H. B. 2006 The prevalence of unwanted and unlawful sexual experiences reported by Danish adolescents: Results from a national youth survey in 2002 Acta Paediatrica 95, 1270–1276     Child victim, adult perp
               
Hemenway, David, Deborah Prothrow-Stith & Angela Browne 2005 Report of the 2004 Boston Youth Survey          Child victim, adult perp
5% of males reported experiencing sexual violence by dating partner during lifetime and another 5% reported experiencing sexual violence by anyone during their lifetime. 7% experienced some form of physical violence by dating partner. Those who experienced these forms of violence scored much higher on the depression scale (and male victims scored more depressed than female victims).
Hendriks, J. & Bijleveld, C. C. J. H. 2006 Female adolescent sex offenders—an exploratory study  Journal of Sexual Aggression: An international, interdisciplinary forum for research, theory and practice 12(1), 31-41     Child/adolescent perp
               
Hendriks, J., Wijkman, M., & Bijleveld, C. 2013 Group sexual offending Handbook on the Study of Multiple Perpetrator Rape: A Multidisciplinary Response to an International Problem Vol. 4 Routledge Horvath, M. A., & Woodhams, J. Child victim, adult perp
Chapter 5 compares adolescent female and male group sexual offenders
Hensley, C., Castle, T., & Tewksbury, R. 2003 Inmate-to-Inmate Sexual Coercion in a Prison for Women  Journal of Offender Rehabilitation 37(2), 77-87     Adult victim, adult perp
Limited academic research exists addressing the issue of sexual coercion in correctional facilities, especially female correctional facilities. However, the study of sexual coercion and consensual same-sex research within correctional facilities is seen as very important. This study focused specifically on inmate-to-inmate female sexual coercion. The study, conducted in March 2000, consisted of all inmates housed in a southern correctional facility for women. Out of the 243 female inmates surveyed, 11 inmates, or 4.5 percent, reported incidents of sexual coercion. The results show that the rates of sexual coercion were relatively low for this women’s correctional facility. However, within the limited amount of research on sexual coercion in female correctional facilities, it is difficult to determine the exact rates of assault in female prisons
Hensley, C., Tallichet, S. E., & Dutkiewicz, E. L. 2010 Childhood Bestiality: A Potential Precursor to Adult Interpersonal Violence  Journal of Interpersonal Violence 25 (3), 557-567     Child/adolescent perp
               
Hepburn, J. M. 1995 The Implications of Contemporary Feminist Theories of Development for the Treatment of Male Victims of Sexual Abuse  Journal of Child Sexual Abuse 3(4), 1-18     Specifically on male victims
               
Hepner, B. A. 2007 An exploratory study of types and characteristics of incarcerated female sex offenders Doctoral dissertation   Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, Texas   Child victim, adult perp
               
Hepner-Williamson, Bridget A. 2012 Media vs. Reality: who is the real female sex offender The Harms of Crime media: essays on the perpetuation of racism, sexism and class stereotypes 78-90   Denise L. Bissler & Joan L. Conners Child victim, adult perp
Cites Muraskin & Domash (2007) and Jerin & Field (1994) regarding media’s distortion of crime and how it influences the public perception of crime. Chapter focuses on how the media minimizes the female sex offender’s harm and delegitimizes the victims. It reinforces the idea that a child is not being harmed and that the male child is somehow benefiting from the abuse. This encourages people to view the victim as somehow contributing to their victimization. Compared media accounts of FSOs w/ a known sample of convicted FSOs (Texan) to show that the media portrayal is not representative. The 129 convicted FSO were from the Gatesville TX FSO treatment program (18 month program, involuntary, for FSOs w/in 24 months of release). The data was from 2006-2008. The media accounts were from LexisNexis search using multiple key phrases including “female”, “woman”, “sex offender”, “pedophile”, “teacher” and “sex”. Found 38 cases that provided adequate information. 58% of the incarcerated offenders were employed, average age was 31 years, 65% were white, most had about 10 years of education, 69% were single and most claimed a history of victimization. Author notes that 53% had “some type of prior mental health issues” but this vague term doesn’t suggest having a severe/persisting mental illness that precluded self-awareness or self-control. 57% were Solo Offenders, 16% had a history of sexual arrests, 26% had a history of non-sexual arrests. The average sentence was 9.8 years; the most common offense (67%) was sexual assault of a child or aggravated sexual assault of a child. The 129 FSOs had 162 victims whose average age was 11 years, with 60% of the victims under age 16. The victims were 54% female/46% male, 31% of the victims were the FSO’s biological child, 23% were an acquaintance of the FSO. Only 7% of the FSOs were Teachers and their victims were also split between male/female. Regarding the media cases, the average age of the FSO was 31 years, but information on educational background and race was limited, as was information regarding mental health or arrest histories (unless directly related to the case). 50% of the cases were married. The average victim age was 13 years, 73% of the victims were male and81% had only a single victim. 60% of the news cases described the victim as consenting to sex by the FSO, despite the fact that 80% of the crimes/charges involved a sexual assault such as rape or molestation. 2 cases involved a male co-offender, both of whom were described as worse that the female sex offender (males were “slave master” and had a ‘high level of arousal by minors” while the women who abused the same kid had “a consensual relationship” and “was in love and forced to offend”). 24 out of the 38 cases (63%) were Teachers. 81.5% of the media reports used positive or neutral language to describe the FSOs, often commenting on their attractiveness, youth and accomplishments (she’s so normal, how could this be bad) while also describing actions using the term “love” or “a sexual relationship”. Only 7 out of the 38 media cases had negative language, 3 of which used the terms Pedophile to describe the women (not all of whom actually carried that clinical diagnosis). Strangely, the most negative description was of 2 women who pretended to be male and who offended against female victims. The prototypical FSO in the state of Texas incarceration sample was a Single mother who sexually assaulted her 11 year old daughter. The prototypical FSO per the media was a married woman who molested a male student. The media minimizes the male child victim but either ignores the female child victim or is critical of short sentences when the victim is female.
Hequembourg,A.L., Livingston,J.A., & Parks, K.A. 2013 Sexual victimization and associated risks among lesbian and bisexual women. Violence Against Women 20(10), 1-24.1077801213490557     Legal issues or research issues
 
Herman-Giddens,M.E.& Berson,N.L. 1989 Harmful genital care practices in children: A type of child abuse JAMA  261(4), 577-579     Child victim, adult perp
 
Hetherton,J  1999 The idealization of women: Its role in the minimizationof child sexual abuse by females Child abuse & neglect 23, 161-174     Legal issues or research issues
 
Hetherton,J., Beardsall,L. 1998 Decisions and attitudes concerning child sexual abuse: Does the gender of the perpetrator make a difference to child protection professionals? Child abuse & neglect 22(12), 1265-1283     Child victim, adult perp
Child protection staff are more permissive regarding female sex offenders, less likely to view them as needing registration and/or imprisonment. Those staff that had more experience with female perps were more likely to agree to the need for imprisonment. 
Hickey,N., McCrory,E.,, Farmer,E. & Vizard,E. 2008 Comparing the developmental and behavioural characteristics of female and male juveniles who present with sexually abusive behaviour Journal of Sexual Aggression: An international, interdisciplinary forum for research, theory, and practice 14(3), 241-252     Legal issues or research issues
N=22 female juveniles (micro-sample) who committed sexual abuse. Study suggested F.S.O.'s have a different pathway to offending than males
Hidalgo,Myra L. 2007 Sexual Abuse and the Culture of Catholicism: How Priests and Nuns Become Perpetrators     Routledge 2007   Adult victim, adult perp
 
Higdon, M. J. 2011 Fatherhood by conscription: Nonconsensual insemination and the duty of child support. Georgia Law Review 46, 407 - 458     Child victim, adult perp
Includes discussion of Adult females who become pregnant via sexual relations with males under the age of consent.
Higgins C.,, & Ireland, C. 2009 Attitudes towards male and female sex offenders: A comparision of forensic staff, prison officers and the general public in Northern Ireland The British Journal of Forensic Practice 11(1), 14-19     Adult victim, adult perp
 
Higgins, C. & Ireland, C. 2009 Attitudes towards male and female sex offenders: a comparison of forensic staff, prison officers and the general public in Northern Ireland.  The British Journal of Forensic Practice 11(1), 14-19     Child victim, adult perp
               
Higgs, D. C., Canavan, M. M. & Meyer, W. J. III 1992 Moving from defense to offence: The development of an adolescent female sex offender.  Journal of Sex Research 29(1), 131-139     Child/adolescent perp
The development of a 14‐year‐old female from defending herself from sexual crimes to committing such a crime is presented in case‐report form.
Higgs,D.C., Canavan, M.M. & Meyer,W.J.III 1992 Moving from defense to offense: The development of an adolescent female sex offender Journal of Sex Research 29(1) 131-139     Legal issues or research issues
The development of a 14?year?old female from defending herself from sexual crimes to committing such a crime is presented in case?report form
Hines, D. A. 2007 Predictors of sexual coercion against women and men: A multilevel, multinational study of university students.[222] Archives of Sexual Behavior 36(3), 403-422     Adult victim, adult perp
Several explanations have been forwarded to account for sexual coercion in romantic relationships. Feminist theory states that sexual coercion is the result of male dominance over women and the need to maintain that dominance; however, studies showing that women sexually coerce men point towards weakness in that theory. Other researchers have found that Gender Hostility is associated with sexual victimization, as is a history of childhood abuse. Study had 7,667 university students from 38 international sites. Used Revised Conflict Tactics Scales, Personal and Relationships Profile, took abuse history, etc. Included Status of Women in each area based upon composite score of women’s representation in government, education and workforce. All Heterosexual. When people are socialized to view relationships as deceptive, manipulative and exploitative, and when the normative view is that relationships are a means of gaining power, rather than of sharing love and tenderness, they are more likely to verbally or forcefully coerce sex from their partners. Found that 3% of men reported a history of being forced to have sex by female partner, 22% experienced verbal coercion. 2.4% of the forced group had oral/anal sex, 2.1% reported forced vaginal sex. For the coercion group, 13.5% reported that partner refused condom use, 11.7% insisted on vaginal sex, 7.5% insisted on oral/anal sex and 1.9% threatened them to have vaginal sex. For each 1 point increase in the status of women index (5 point scale), the odds of men reported forced sexual coercion increased by 25%. For each 1 point increase on the Gender Hostility to Men scale, the odds of forced sexual coercion increased by 38%. Worst sites: Louisiana, USA, Sao Paulo Brazil, Freisburg, Germany.
Hines, D. A., & Saudino, K. J. 2003 Gender differences in psychological, physical, and sexual aggression among college students using the revised conflict tactics scales.  Violence and Victims 18(2), 197-217     Adult victim, adult perp
In response to criticisms of the Conflict Tactics Scales, Straus revised the original scale to include sexual aggression and injury. The purpose of the present study was to use this new scale to replicate and expand existing knowledge of psychological, physical, and sexual aggression in dating relationships. Four-hundred-eighty-one college students completed the Revised Conflict Tactics Scales. As expected, females reported perpetrating more psychological aggression than males; there were no gender differences in reported physical aggression; and psychological and physical aggression tended to co-occur. Contrary to previous research, there were no gender differences in injuries. As expected, males reported perpetrating more sexual coercion than females; however, females also reported perpetrating sexual aggression, and there were no gender differences in reported victimization. For males, sexual coercion perpetration (not victimization) was related to the perpetration and victimization of physical and psychological aggression. For females, both sexual coercion perpetration and victimization were related to the perpetration and victimization of psychological aggression and victimization from physical aggression, but not to physical aggression perpetration.
Hird, M.J., & Jackson,S. 2001 Where 'angels' and 'wusses' fear to tread: Sexual coercion in adolescent dating relationships.  Journey of Sociology 37(1), 27-43     Adult victim, adult perp
 
Hirschberg, D., & Riskin, K. 1994 Female adolescent sexual offenders in residential treatment: Characteristics and treatment implications         Child victim, adult perp
               
Hislop, J. 2001 Female Sex Offenders: What Therapists, Law Enforcement and Child Protection Services Need to Know      Ravensdale, WA: Idyll Arbor, Inc   Child victim, adult perp
               
Hislop, J. R. 1999 Female child molesters  Female Sexual Abusers: Three Views 135-310 Brandon, VT: Safer Society Press P. A. Davin, J. R. Hislop, & T. Dunbar Child victim, adult perp
Found that the average age of victims for female perpetrated sexual abuse was 8.76 years and the average age difference between victims and perpetrators was 11.9 years.
Hogben, M., Byrne, D. &, M. E. 1996 Coercive Heterosexual Sexuality in Dating Relationships of College Students -- Implications of Differential Male-Female Experiences.  Journal of Psychology & Human Sexuality 8(1), 69-78     Adult victim, adult perp
               
Hogben,M., Byrne,D., & M.E. 1996 Coercive Heterosexual Sexuality in Dating Relationships of College Students--Implications of Different Male-Female Experiences Journal of Psychology & Human Sexuality 8(1), 69-78     Adult victim, adult perp
 
Hogben,M., Waterman, C.K. 2000 Patterns of conflict resolution within relationships and coercive sexual behavior of men and women Sex Roles 43(5-6), 341-357     Adult victim, adult perp
Found that college-aged males and females used the same amount of physical violence in trying to procure non-consensual sex.
Hollender, M. H., Brown, W., & Roback, H. B. 1977 Genital exhibitionism in women  American Journal of Psychiatry 134 (4), 436-438     Out-dated, erroneous, etc.
               
Holmes, G. R., Offen, L., & Waller, G. 1997 See no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil: Why do relatively few male victims of childhood sexual abuse receive help for abuse-related issues in adulthood?  Clinical Psychology Review 17(1), 69-88.     Specifically on male victims
               
Holmes, Guy & Liz Offen 1996 Clinicians' hypotheses regarding clients' problems: Are they less likely to hypothesize sexual abuse in male compared to female clients? Child Abuse & Neglect 20 (6) 1996, 493–501     Child victim, adult perp
Sixty-one clinical psychologists completed a questionnaire about a detailed case summary of an adult client which incorporated a number of indicators that the client may have been sexually abused. The gender of the client was manipulated. Significantly more clinicians hypothesized that the female client (compared to the male client) had been sexually abused in childhood. Clinicians who were more recently qualified, and clinicians who identified their predominant theoretical orientation as psychodynamic (rather than cognitive-behavioral), were more likely to hypothesize sexual abuse, although these effects were only statistically significant for the female clients. The majority of clinicians hypothesizing sexual abuse in the female client rated the abuse as the most important issue to address in therapy; this was not the case for the male client. These findings are discussed in relation to the literature suggesting that the apparent low number of male victims of sexual abuse currently being seen by the helping professions may in part be accounted for by a lack of awareness in clinicians as to the possibility that males, including their male clients, are sexually abused.
Holmes, William C., and Gail B. Slap 1998 Sexual abuse of boys JAMA: the journal of the American Medical Association 280, no. 21 (1998): 1855-1862     Specifically on male victims
rates of female perpetrator abuse from 27% to 78%
Horrocks, Chelsea   The Myth of the Female Sex Offender Undergraduate Review 6, 100-106     Child victim, adult perp
Female sex offenders are most often in their late twenties or early thirties and the majority are Caucasian (Vandiver et al., 2008). Female offenders are significantly more likely than male offenders to victimize children under the age of twelve (Freeman & Sandler, 2008). The exact occurrence of co-offending is difficult to determine, but it is known that women more often offend with another person or in a group than men do (Vandiver et al., 2008). A common stereotype of sex offenders is that they offend against victims of the opposite sex. However, in some studies it has been suggested that the victims of female sex offenders are almost equally likely to be females as males. Vandiver and Kercher suggest that this could be caused by the increased likelihood that a woman is acting with a man, or at his urging (2004). Using a qualitative approach, this research compared and contrasted female and male sex offenders. Specifically the study reviewed the existing typology of female sex offenders as developed by Vandiver (2002) and the typology of male sex offenders as articulated by Groth (1979). Applying them to two high profile cases involving female offenders. Case studies were used in this research to establish the applicability of two existing typologies to actual crimes.
Hovey, Angela 2005 Feminism as a context for understanding and responding to female sexual offending Canadian Social Work Review/Revue canadienne de service social (2005): 89-102     Legal issues or research issues
               
Hovey, Angela; B.J. Rye & Carol A. Stalker 2013 Do Therapists' Beliefs about Sexual Offending Affect Counseling Practices with Women? Journal of Child Sexual Abuse 22 (5) 2013     Legal issues or research issues
This study explored whether counseling practices with women survivors of child sexual abuse reflect the belief that women do not sexually abuse children. Canadian therapists (n = 164) who work with women survivors of child sexual abuse were surveyed about their beliefs about what constitutes child sexual abuse, who commits child sexual abuse, and their practices regarding inquiries about abusive behavior. A majority self-reported that they ask women and think it is important to ask but most believe that clients will not spontaneously self-disclose inappropriate sexual thoughts or behaviors. How broadly or narrowly therapists defined child sexual abuse was not related to self-reported therapeutic discussion. Therapists demonstrated differential gender beliefs about child sexual abuse perpetration, but this did not relate to self-reported counseling practices. Implications for therapist education are discussed
Hovey,A., Stalker,C., & Rye,B.J. 2014 Asking Women Survivors about Thoughts or Actions Involving Sex with Children: An Issue Requiring Therapist Sensitivity Journal of child sex abuse 23(4), 442-461     Child victim, adult perp
Used telephone interviews of 22 Canadian therapists to find out if they ask about sexual offending thoughts/behaviors in adult female victims of child sexual abuse.  
Hovey,A.K. 2010 An Exploration of Counselling Practices with Women Survivors of Childhood Sexual Abuse: Should Therapists Ask About Thoughts or Behaviour Involving Sex with Children?  Unpublished dissertation Wilfrid Laurier University       Legal issues or research issues
Notes that the helping professions have been reluctant to acknowledge female sexual abuse of minors, despite the increased risk of offending by female adult survivors of childhood sexual abuse. Asked if therapists working with female adult survivors ask questions about perpetration thoughts/behaviors. Found that, while 70% of the surveyed therapists think that it is important to ask about possible perpetration thoughts/behaviors, they didn't actually do so.  The therapists also held gendered ideas of what was sexually abusive behavior, viewing behaviors such as perpetration by a male as more 'inappropriate' than the same behavior by a female. 
Howard, J. A. 1984 Societal influences on attribution: Blaming some victims more than others Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 47(3), 494     Child victim, adult perp
2 studies (N=135 college students read vignettes of sexual assault; N=160 college students viewed video of assaults). Found more blame of female victims based on character, more blame of male victims based on behaviour. Male victims are expected to fight and/or escape.
Howell, Alanna 2007 Victims of child sexual abuse : who's responsible and who's believable?  Master’s thesis       Child victim, adult perp
This thesis investigates whether perpetrator-victim and counselor characteristics influence counselors’ views of victim responsibility and credibility. Counsellors (n=149) surveyed by mail and over the internet read a vignette describing an incident of CSA, completed a 12-question survey along a 7-point Likert-type scale, responded to 2 open-ended discussion questions, and completed a demographic survey. Results from a logistic regression analysis found that: victim gender predicted views of victim responsibility for boys; more years of counseling experience predicted the disbelief of CSA disclosures; and more years’ experience counseling CSA clients predicted credibility of CSA disclosures. Early feminist works on CSA are used to argue that transgressions of gender norms elicit interpretations of victims that realign their behaviour with patriarchal ideals of femininity and masculinity. However, the existence of various gender pairings of perpetrator-victim relationships suggest that my findings support a revised view of patriarchy that is more in line with intersectional feminist literature.
Howitt, D. 1995 Paedophiles and Sexual Offenses Against Children.      West Sussex, England: John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.   Child victim, adult perp
               
Hudson, A.H. 1996 Personality assessment of female sex offenders: A cluster analysis. Dissertation Abstracts International 56(9-B), 5212     Assessment or treatment related
               
Hughes, T. L., Johnson, T., & Wilsnack, S. C. 2001 Sexual assault and alcohol abuse: A comparison of lesbians and heterosexual women. Journal of Substance Abuse 13(4), 515-532     Child victim, adult perp
27% of lesbians reported that they were sexually assaulted by a date (female)
Hughes,T.L., Haas,A.P., Razzano,L., Cassidy,R., & Matthews,A. 2000 Comparing lesbians' and heterosexual women's mental health: A multi-site survey Journal of gay & Lesbian Social Services 11(1), 57-76     Legal issues or research issues
Descriptive study, N=550 lesbians from 2 major US cities 1004-1996.  16% reported a history of sexual assault by an inmate partner
Hui, C. 2002 Knowledge, Behavior and Personality Characteristics of Females with Sexual Wrong Doings.  Chinese Journal of Health Education   11, 0.   Child victim, adult perp
               
Hull, L. A., & Panesis, S. K. 1984 Women Who Rape Boston: Massachusetts Trial Court       Adult victim, adult perp
               
Hunt, L.M. 2006 Females who sexually abuse in organizations working with children. Characteristics, International and Australian prevalence rates: Implications for child protection.      Melbourne, Australia: Child Wise   Child victim, adult perp
               
Hunter, J. A., & Mathews, R. 1997 Sexual deviance in females  Sexual Deviance: Theory, Assessment, and Treatment 465-480 New York: The Guilford Press. R. D. Laws & W. O’Donohue Child victim, adult perp
               
Hunter, J. A., Becker, J. V., & Lexier, L. J. 2006 The female juvenile sex offender  The juvenile sex offender 148–165 New York: Guilford Press H. E. Barbaree & W. L. Marshall Child/adolescent perp
               
Hunter, J. A., Lexier, L.. J., Goodwin, D.W., Browne, P.A., & Dennis, C. 1993 Psychosexual, attitudinal, and developmental characteristics of juvenile female perpetrators in a residential treatment setting.  Journal of Child and Family Studies 2, 317- 326     Child/adolescent perp
N=10 juvenile female sex offenders, 40% molested strangers rather than relatives, averaged 2.5 victims each, average victim age was 5 years. 60% of the perps had male victims. 70% perpetrated vaginal rape, 10% perpetrated anal rape, 70% perpetrated oral sexual assault. 60% reported fantasizing about the crime before they did the crime and 20% reported masturbating to fantasies of significantly younger children (deviant sexual arousal). 6 of the 10 (60%) reported being sexually victimized by a woman in their own past.
Hunter, K. 1994 Helping survivors through counseling  Female Sexual Abuse of Children 37-46 New York: The Guilford Press. M. Elliott Assessment or treatment related
               
Hunter, M. 1990 Abused boys: The neglected victims of sexual abuse     Lexington Books/DC Heath.   Child victim, adult perp
               
Impett, E. A., & Peplau, L. A. 2003 Sexual compliance: Gender, motivational, and relationship perspectives  Journal of Sex Research 40(1), 87-100.     Adult victim, adult perp
               
Isely, Paul J., and David Gehrenbeck-Shim 1997 Sexual assault of men in the community Journal of Community Psychology 25, no. 2 (1997): 159-166.     Specifically on male victims
out of 705 men who sought medical attention following a sexual assault, only 23% in one study revealed the sexual nature of the injury to medical personnel
Izdebski,Z. 2012 Seksualnosc Polakow na poczatku XXI wieku Studium badawcze (Poles' sexuality in the early twenty-first century.  A research study) Wydawnictwo Unwersytetu Jagiellonskiego Krakow   Jagiellonian University Press   Legal issues or research issues
Polish study overall rates of sexual aggression victimization 36.4% for men and 31.3% for women
J. Barth, Bermetz, E., Heim,S T. Tonia 2012 The current prevalence of child sexual abuse worldwide: a systematic review and meta-analysis International Journal of Public Health       Child victim, adult perp
Meta-analysis of 55 studies from 24 countries published 2002-2009, found an average of 3 out of 100 boys were forced to have intercourse
Jackson, S. 2007 Female Sex Offenders: A new challenge for the criminal justice system.  Unpublished Ph.D. dissertation   California State University, Long Beach   Assessment or treatment related
               
Jackson, Susan M, Fiona Cram & Fred W. Seymour 2000 Violence and Sexual Coercion in High School Students' Dating Relationships Journal of Family Violence March 2000, 15 (1) 23-36     Child victim, adult perp
A review of the dating violence literature reveals a limited number of studies with high school students and few studies that investigate the contextual issues of violence, such as meaning, motivation, and consequences. The present study sought to investigate the extent of dating violence victimization in a New Zealand sample of senior high school students (aged 16 to 18 years) and the perceived reasons for the violence, emotional effects, disclosure of the violence, and relationship consequences. A questionnaire that contained both open-ended and forced-choice items pertaining to experiences of violence and its consequences was developed using material gathered from focus group discussions with high school students. Findings showed gender similarity in the extent of violence and a number of significant gender differences in the aftermath of violence, particularly in the area of sexual coercion. These findings are discussed in the context of future research and prevention of dating violence. Furthermore, a few studies have investigated only female victimization and male perpetration, ignoring female perpetration and male victimization (e.g., Dekeseredy & Schwartz, 1994; Mercer, 1988). It is important that future researchers examine gender as a matter of course but in a way that advances knowledge in ways that straightforward reporting of violence rates does not. This means, for example, investigating whether acts of violence, when of similar form, are equivalent in meaning or consequence for females and males (Bograd, 1990). By such examinations our knowledge of the relationship between gender and violence is advanced. Gender differences emerged in how the students dealt with emotional violence. Overall, male students were markedly less likely to talk to someone (friend, family, partner, counselor) about emotional violence than their female counterparts were. Significantly more males (29.8%) than females (9.7%) reported that they had talked to "nobody" about it or did not need to talk at all (4.1% females, 14.9% males. Overall, 130 female students (76.9%) and 91 male students (67.4%) reported they had experienced one or more incidents of unwanted sexual activity. Similar numbers of male and female students reported most types of nonconsensual sexual activity; the exception was being felt up, which significantly more female than male students reported. In addition to being asked about experiencing unwanted sexual activity, students were given a list of settings and asked to check those in which unwanted sexual activity had occurred. Half of the female students and 40% of the males reported that unwanted sexual activity had occurred at parties. Other comparatively prevalent settings included partner's house, friend's house, and hanging out with friends. Significantly more male than female students reported unwanted sexual activity at school. Unwanted sexual activity was more often reported in long-term relationships than in relationships with new partners, acquaintances, friends, partners of unspecified time together, or casual partners. More than half (58%) of female students indicated that unwanted sexual activity had occurred with acquaintances or in casual relationships, and slightly fewer than half of male students (46.7%). Students were given a list of 11 possible reasons for engaging in unwanted sex. Overall, perceived reasons for sexual coercion were similar for boys and girls. A substantial number of students reported having unwanted sex to show that they loved their partner (44.2% males, 34.7% females) or because they thought it was what the partners wanted (36.9% females, 35.6% males). Alcohol was also commonly reported as a reason for unwanted sexual activity. More than a quarter of each group (29.8% of males, and 26.9% of females) reported alcohol or drug use to be a main reason for the unwanted sexual activity. Significantly more male students reported having unwanted sexual activity because they thought their friends were doing it (21% males, 10.1% females). Relatively few students, male or female, reported fear of losing a partner, being held down (forced), being threatened with harm, or being hassled as reasons for unwanted sexual activity. Notably, almost as many males as females reported being held down and forced to have sex. Substantial numbers of each gender indicated that they talked to nobody (46.8% male, 46.1% female).
Jennings, K. T. 1994 Female child molesters: A review of the literature.  Female Sexual Abuse of Children 219-234 New York: The Guilford Press M. Elliott Child victim, adult perp
               
Jennings,K.T. 1994 Female child molesters: A review of the literature. In M. Elliott (Ed) Female Sexual Abuse of Children 219-234 New York : The Guilford Press   Legal issues or research issues
 
Jespersen, Ashley F., Lalumiere, Martin L & Seto, Michael C. 2009 Sexual abuse history among adult sex offenders and non-sex offenders: a meta-analysis Child Abuse & Neglect 33, 179-192     Child victim, adult perp
Reviewed 17 studies of sex offenders and non-sex offenders and prevalence of different types of abuse experienced by children and adults. Found support for the abused-abuser hypothesis. Found that high rates of sexual victimization among sex offenders, relative to non-sex offenders, but not a high history of physical abuse, emotional abuse or neglect. They did a break down between sex offenders against children and against adults and found that those who offended against adults had more physical abuse victimization history while those who offended against children had more sexual abuse victimization history. After ruling out a publication bias, they theorized that this association may be related to Learning, Sexual Development issues and Familial Transmission issues.
Johansson-Love, J. 2007 A 2x2 comparison of offender and gender; what characteristics do female sex offenders have in common with other offender groups? Unpublished dissertation   West Virginia University   Child victim, adult perp
               
Johansson-Love, J. and Fremouw, W. 2008 Female Sexual Perpetrators: Is It More Than Just a Gender Difference? Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychology   Law Society, Hyatt Regency Jacksonville Riverfront, Jacksonville, FL, Mar 05   Child victim, adult perp
               
Johansson-Love, J., & Fremouw, W. 2006 A critique of the female sexual perpetrator research.  Aggression and Violent Behavior 11, 12-26     Child victim, adult perp
               
Johansson-Love, J., & Fremouw, W. 2009 Female Sex Offenders: A Controlled Comparison of Offender and Victim/Crime Characteristics.  Journal of Family Violence 24, 367-376     Child victim, adult perp
               
Johansson-Love,J. 2007 A 2x2 comparison of offender and gender; what characteristics do female sex offenders have in common with other offender groups? Unpublished dissertation West Virginia University       Legal issues or research issues
 
Johnson, Dana. 2004 Child Support Obligations That Result from Male Sexual Victimization: An Examination of the Requirement of Support  Northern Illinois University Law Review 25 (2004): 515     Legal issues or research issues
               
Johnson, K., Scott, J., Rughita, B., Kisielewski, M., Asher, J., Ong, R., & Lawry, L. 2010 Association of sexual violence and human rights violations with physical and mental health in territories of the Eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo. JAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association    304(5), 553-562     Adult victim, adult perp
N=998 households, with 39.7% of women reporting sexual victimization and 41.1% of the perps in those cases were women. 26.6% of men reported sexual victimization and 10% of the perps were women.
Johnson, R. L., & Schrier, D. 1987 Past sexual victimization by females of male patients in an adolescent medicine clinic population.  American Journal of Psychiatry 144(5), 650-652     Specifically on male victims
11 out of 25 boys (5-17) treated at this clinic were sexually abused by a female (ages 16-36)
Johnson, T. C. 1988 Child perpetrators: Children who molest other children, preliminary findings Child Abuse and Neglect 12, 219-229     Child/adolescent perp
               
Johnson, T. C. 1989 Female child perpetrators: Children who molest other children  Child Abuse and Neglect 13, 571-585     Child/adolescent perp
Estimates that females represent 22% of juvenile sexual offenders
Johnson,R.J.,Ross,M.W., Taylor,W.C., Williams,M.L., Carvaial,R.I.,&Peters,R.J. 2006 Prevalence of childhood sexual abuse among incarcerated males in county jail Child abuse & neglect 30(1), 75-86     Legal issues or research issues
N=100 male inmates, 59% reported sexual abuse prior to age 13 years, average first age of abuse 9.6 years, 90% of the perpetrators were female either friends (n-72) or family members (n=56
Jones, Ruth 2002 Inequality from Gender-Neutral Laws: Why Must Male Victims of Statutory Rape Pay Child Support for Children Resulting from Their Victimization  Georgia law Review 36 411-464 2001-2002     Legal issues or research issues
               
Jones, Susan J. 2013 A Portrait of Boundary Violations: Former Female Employees of Corrections Who Have Established a Relationship With an Inmate  doctoral thesis       Child victim, adult perp
in place where they did not feel connected to their colleagues but did find a connection with an inmate
Joslyn, Jayme Lynn 2011 Female Teachers as Sexual Predators: A Qualitative study of grades 7-12 in the state of Florida's public schools  Dissertation       Child victim, adult perp
               
Judson, Stephanie S., Dawn M. Johnson, and Alycia LU Perez. 2013 Perceptions of Adult Sexual Coercion as a Function of Victim Gender Psychology of Men & Masculinity Vol 14(4), Oct 2013, 335-344.     Child victim, adult perp
               
Justice, B., & Justice, R. 1979 The broken taboo: Sex in the family   168-200 New York: Human Sciences Press   Child victim, adult perp
Has 3 pages on mother-son incest
K Munro              
includes articles regarding sexual offenses against both males and females on her website
Kalders, A., Inkster, H., & Britt, E. 1997 Females who offend sexually against children in New Zealand.  The Journal of Sexual Aggression 3(1), 15-29     Child victim, adult perp
               
Kalichman SC, Sarwer DB, Johnson JR, Ali SA, Early J & Tuten JT 1993 Sexually coercive behavior and love styles: a replication and extension Journal of psychology and human sexuality 6 91-107     Child victim, adult perp
College men were grouped as either: not having experienced sexual intercourse (n = 25), consensually experienced with intercourse only (n = 56), or sexually coercive (n = 42), based on self-reported sexual history. Comparisons were made on six love styles, three adult attachment styles, and self-reported experiences in love relationships. Results replicated earlier research, finding that men who had been sexually coercive endorsed a manipulative, game-playing orientation toward intimate relationships to a greater extent than both other groups. Although sexually coercive men did not differ from the other two groups in their romantic attachment styles, they did report less happiness, friendship, and trust in their romantic relationships. Results suggest that avoidance does not characterize sexually coercive men, but rather manipulation and deception appear to form the link between love styles and sexual coercion.
Kaplan, M.S., & Green, A. 1995 Incarcerated female sex offenders: A comparison of sexual histories with eleven female nonsexual offenders. Sexual Abuse: A Journal of Research and Treatment 7, 287-300     Assessment or treatment related
focuses on perpetrators’ victimization histories; Used incarcerated sample, small sample size (11 women), reported they had PTSD, depression and personality disorders (none of which decrease their responsibility, ability to know right from wrong)
Kasl, C. S. 1990 Female perpetrators of sexual abuse: A feminist view.  The Sexually Abused Male. Prevalence, Impact, and Treatment   Lexington, MA: Lexington Books. M. Hunter Child victim, adult perp
               
Katz,J., Moore,J.A., & Tkachuk,S. 2007 Verbal sexual coercion and perceived victim responsibility: Mediating effects of perceived control Sex Roles 57(3-4), 235-247     Legal issues or research issues
 
Kaufman, K. L., Wallace, A. M., Johnson, C. F., & Reeder, M. L. 1995 Comparing female and male perpetrators’ modus operandi: Victims’ reports of sexual abuse.  Journal of Interpersonal Violence 10(3), 322-333     Child victim, adult perp
               
Kelley, S. J., Brant, R., & Waterman, J. 1993 Sexual abuse of children in day care centers.  Child Abuse & Neglect 17, 71-89     Child victim, adult perp
               
Kelly, R. J., Wood, J. J., Gonzalez, L. S., MacDonald, V., & Waterman, J. 2002 Effects of mother-son incest and positive perceptions of sexual abuse experiences on the psychosocial adjustment of clinic-referred men  Child Abuse & Neglect 26(4), 425-441     Child victim, adult perp
Seventeen men reported mother-son incest, and these men endorsed more trauma symptoms than did other sexually abused men, even after controlling for a history of multiple perpetrators and physical abuse. Mother-son incest was likely to be subtle, involving behaviors that may be difficult to distinguish from normal care-giving (e.g., genital touching), despite the potentially serious long-term consequences. Twenty-seven men recalled positive or mixed initial perceptions of the abuse, including about half of the men who had been abused by their mothers. These men reported more adjustment problems than did men who recalled purely negative initial perceptions
Kendall-Tackett, K. A., & Simon, A. F. 1987 Perpetrators and their acts: Data from 365 adults molested as children  Child Abuse & Neglect 11, 237-45     Child victim, adult perp
               
Kernsmith, P. D. & Kernsmith, R. M. 2009 Female Pornography Use and Sexual Coercion Perpetration  Deviant Behavior 30(7), 589-610     Adult victim, adult perp
               
Kia-Keating,M., Grossman, F.K., Sorsoli, L., & Epstein M. 2005 Containing and Resisting Masculinity: Narratives of Renegotiation Among Resilient Male Survivors of Childhood Sexual Abuse  Psychology of Men & Masculinity 6(3), 169     Specifically on male victims
 
Kierski, Werner 2002 Female violence: can we therapists face up to it?  Counselling and Psychotherapy Journal 13 (10) 32-35 2002     Adult victim, adult perp
               
Kierski,Werner 2002 Female Violence: can we therapists face up to it?  Counselling and Psychotherapy Journal 13 (10) 32-35     Assessment or treatment related
 
King, M., Coxell, A., & Mezey, G. 2002 Sexual molestation of males: Associations with psychological disturbance The British Journal of Psychiatry 181(2), 153-157     Child victim, adult perp
Study of 2,474 from medical clinics in UK. Average age was 46, mostly Caucasian, mostly heterosexual. 20.9% had nonconsensual sex before age 16, about 20% of the perps were female
King, Michael &Earnest Woollett 1997 Sexually Assaulted Males: 115 Men Consulting a Counseling Service  Archives of Sexual Behavior 1997, 26,(6) 579-588     Specifically on male victims
All men were seen at least once for face-to-face counseling at SURVIVORS, a counseling service for male victims. Data on 115 men were analyzed: 69 were assaulted while under age 16. 6% of the men were assaulted by a man and a woman, and 7% by women. 79% sought no help and only 15% reported to police. Victims assaulted by more than one person were more likely to have been assaulted by strangers, by women, and to have suffered physical harm. In the majority of the cases involving women, the perpetrator was a family member (usually the mother).
Kinsey, A. C., Pomeroy, W. R., Martin, C. E., and Gebhard, P. H. 1953 Sexual Behavior in the Human Female.  Philadelphia, PA: W. B. Saunders       Out-dated, erroneous, etc.
               
Kirsta, A. 1994 Deadlier Than The Male: Violence and Aggression in Women      New York: Harper Collins   Adult victim, adult perp
               
Kisanga, Felix 2012 Child sexual abuse in urban Tanzania: possibilities and barriers for prevention          Child victim, adult perp
The school survey showed that 28% (boys=30%, girls=26%) of the students were exposed to child sexual abuse, with boys more often affected than girls. Twenty-six per cent of boys and 19% of girls reported being forced to look at pornography. Forced sexual intercourse was experienced by 9.8% of boys and 8.7% of girls
Kite, D. & Tyson, G. A. 2004 The Impact of Perpetrator Gender on Male and Female Police Officers' Perceptions of Child Sexual Abuse. Psychiatry, Psychology and Law 11(2), 308-318     Child victim, adult perp
               
Kjellgren, C., Priebe, G., Svedin, C.G., Mossige, S. & Långström, N. 2011 Female Youth Who Sexually Coerce: Prevalence, Risk, and Protective Factors in Two National High School Surveys  The Journal of Sexual Medicine 8, (12) (2011): 3354-3362     Child/adolescent perp
N=4,363 Scandinavian high school age females, out of whom 37 (0.8%) reported engaging in some form of sexual coercion. The sexually coercive group was more likely to endorse rape myths, had more sexual preoccupation and friends using violent porn compared with non-sex conduct problem females.
Knack, N.M., Murphy,L., Ranger, R., Metson C., Fedoroff J.P 2015 Assessment of Female Sexual Arousal in Forensic Populations Current psychiatry reports 17  (4) 1-8     Legal issues or research issues
. Reviewed the research on Vaginal Photoplethysmography to measure female genital arousal and whether or not it is category-specific.

 
Knoll, J. 2010 Teacher Sexual Misconduct: Grooming Patterns and Female Offenders  Journal of Child Sexual Abuse 19(4), 371-386     Child victim, adult perp
               
Knopp, F. H. & Lackey, L. B. 1987 Female Sexual Abusers: A Summary of Data from 44 Treatment Providers     Female Orwell, VT: The Safer Society Press   Child victim, adult perp
               
Koonin, R. 1995 Breaking the last taboo: Child sexual abuse by female perpetrators.  Australian Social Work 30(2), 195-210     Child victim, adult perp
               
Krahe, B & Anja Berger 2013 Men and women as perpetrators and victims of sexual aggression in heterosexual and same-sex encounters: A study of first-year college students in Germany Aggressive Behavior 39 (5) 391–404 2013     Adult victim, adult perp
This study examined the prevalence of sexual aggression and victimization in a large convenience sample of N = 2,149 first-year college students from different universities in Germany. Participants were asked about both victimization by, and perpetration of, sexual aggression since the age of 14. Both same-sex and heterosexual victim–perpetrator constellations were examined. Prevalence rates were established for different victim–perpetrator relationships (partners, acquaintances, strangers) and for incidents involving alcohol consumption by one or both partners. The overall perpetration rate was 13.2%, for men and 7.6% for women. The overall victimization rate was 35.9% for women and 19.4% for men. A disparity between victimization and perpetration reports was found for both men and women. Perpetration and victimization rates were highest among participants who had sexual contacts with both opposite-sex and same-sex partners. Sexual aggression and victimization rates were higher between current or former partners and acquaintances than between strangers. Alcohol consumption by one or both partners was involved in almost 75% of all victimization and almost 70% of all perpetration incidents.
Krahé, B., Scheinberger-Olwig, R., & Bieneck, S. 2003 Men's Reports of Nonconsensual Sexual Interactions with Women: Prevalence and Impact.  Archives of Sexual Behavior 32(2), 165-175     Adult victim, adult perp
               
Krahe, B., Scheinberger-Olwig, R., & Kolpin, S. 2000 Ambiguous communication of sexual intentions as a risk marker of sexual aggression.  Sex Roles: A Journal of Research 42(5-6), 313-337     Adult victim, adult perp
               
Krahe, B., Waizenhofer, E., Moller, I. 2003 Women’s sexual aggression against men: Prevalence and predictors.  Sex Roles: A Journal of Research 49(5-6), 219-232     Adult victim, adult perp
               
Krahe,B., Berger,A., Vanwesenbeeck I., Bianchi, G., Chliaoutakis J., Fernandez-Fuertes, A.A., Antonio Fuertesg, Margarida Gaspar de Matosh, Eleni Hadjigeorgioui, Birgitt Hallerj, Sabine Hellemansk, Zbigniew Izdebskil,M, Christiana Koutai, Dwayne Meijinckesc, Liubove, Muraskienen, Maria Papadakakie, Lucia Romiroh, Marta Reish, Katrien Symonsk, Paulina Tomaszewskaa, Isabel Vicario-Molinag & Andrzej Zygadlol 2015 Prevalence and correlates of young people's sexual aggression perpetration and victimisation in 10 Europen countries: a multi-level analysys Culture Health & Seuxality pages 01-18     Legal issues or research issues
Data regarding sexual victimization and Perpetration from 10 countries (Austria, Belgium, Cyprus, Greece, Lithuania, the Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, and Spain). N = 3,480 (heterosexual participants aged between 18 and 27 years). Between 2.6%-14.8% of females reported having perpetrated at least one act of sexual aggression.  Between 10.1%-55.8% of males reported having experienced at least one incident of sexual victimization since the age of consent. In 2 countries, sexual victimization rates were significantly higher for males than for females.  Victimization correlated with alcohol use during sexual encounters. Perpetration correlated negatively with sexual assertiveness in women ?????   Lower gender equality in political power and higher sexual assertiveness in women relative to men were linked to higher male victimization rates. Gender gap for perpetration was significant in only 4 countries (Cyprus, Greece, Lithuania, & Spain).  The lowest total rates found in Belgium (5.5% for men and 2.6% for women) and the highest total rates found in Greece (48.7% for men and 14.8% for women). In terms of technique of sexual aggression, both genders exploited the victim's inability to resist (2.5% for women), used physical force (2.2% for women) and verbal pressure (2.3% for women).  4.6% of women responded yes to at least one question about perpetration of sexual aggression towards current or former sexual partner.   27.1% of men reported sexual victimization, ranging from 10.1% in Belgium to 55.8% in Greece.  In 5 countries, the men reported higher victimization rates than did women (Cyprus, Greece, Lithuania, Poland, and Portugal) with only Cyprus and Lithuania statistically significant.  15.8% of males reported being victims of physical force, 14.6% were victims of their inability to resist, 11.2% were victims of verbal pressure and 7.8% were victims of the perpetrator's authority.  23.4% of males were victimized by current or former partner but in Belgium, Portugal, Slovakia and Spain, their perpetrators were mostly acquaintances.  Women were more accepting of dating violence than were men, which was a significant predictor of sexual aggression perpetration.  For every increase in one scale point in acceptance of dating aggression, the odds of being in the perpetrator group went up 84% for women. For women, their odds of perpetrating sexual aggression increased by 11% per year of age. Oddly, their odds of being a perp was reduced by 1/3 for every scale point on the sexual assertiveness measure
Krahe,B., Scheinberger-Olwig,R., & Kolpin,S. 2000 Ambiguous communication of sexual intentions as a risk marker of sexual aggression Sex Roles: A journal of Research 42 (5-6) 313,337     Legal issues or research issues
 
Krahe,B., Tomaszewska,P., Kuyper L., & Vanwesenbeeck,I 2014 Prevalence of sexual aggression among young people in Europe: A review of the evidence from 27 EU countries Aggression and Violent Behavior 19, 545-558     Legal issues or research issues
Comprehensive review of 113 prevalence studies conducted in 27 countries of the European Union, 104 presented data on female sexual victimization and 71 presented data on male victimization, as part of a Youth Sexual Aggression & Victimization project.  The rates of female sexual aggression ranged from 0.8% to 40%.  
Kramer, Elizabeth J 1998 When men are victims: Applying rape shield laws to male same-sex rape  New York University Law Review 73 (1998): 293     Specifically on male victims
               
Kramer, S. 1974 Episodes of severe ego regression in the course of adolescent analysis The analyst and the adolescent at work, 190-231     Child victim, adult perp
Mentions a case of mother-son incest
Kramer, S. 2009, January Confronting the Ultimate Taboo: A Qualitative Analysis of Expert Perceptions of the Female Pedophile Culture, Health & Sexuality 11 36     Child victim, adult perp
               
Kramer, S., & Bowman, B. 2011 Accounting for the ‘invisibility’ of the female paedophile: an expert-based perspective from South Africa  Psychology & Sexuality 2(3), 244-258     Child victim, adult perp
Looked at perceptions of 4 South African professionals involved in either the treatment of abused children or in law enforcement or policy making. Viewed female sex offenders as lacking agency.
Kramer, Sherianne 2010 Discourse and Power in the Self-Perceptions of Incarcerated South African Female Sexual Offenders  Thesis       Child victim, adult perp
While most of the women were charged with rape, the actual sexual acts were by no means similar across the sample. Rather, they included a range of different acts including child prostitution, grievous bodily harm, indecent assault, the production of child pornography and child sexual abuse. Interestingly, all of the offences involved children as victims. Another significant observation regarding these offences is that most of them involved a male accomplice. Those women that acted alone blamed their sons for their crimes. Not a single participant felt that she was guilty of a crime. Most of the participants‟ perpetrations involved offences against their own children. However, these offences were discursively renegotiated so that the narratives of the crimes centered on the participant as a protective and caring mother. The participants thus not only upheld their subjective innocence but also problematized themselves as criminals by producing themselves as the protector rather than as the perpetrator.
Kramer,Elizabeth,J. 1998 "When men are victims: Applying ape shield alws to male same-sex rape"  New York University Law Review 73 (1998): 293     Specifically on male victims
 
Kramer,S. 2015 Surfacing (im) possible victims: A crtcal revew of the role of gender, sexuality nad pwer in constructing the condtions of possiilty for South African victims of female sex cromes.  Sexualtes. Kramer,S (2015) 18(3), 346-372     Legal issues or research issues
Estimated that 0.6% of all incarcerated women in South African prison were sexual offenders.
Krienert,J. & Walsh, J 2011 Sibling sexual abuse: An emprirical analysis of offender, victim, and event characteristics in national incident-based reprting system (NIBRS) data, 2000-2007 Journal of Child Abuse 20(4), 353-372     Legal issues or research issues
Used data from National Incident-based Reporting System 1000-2007, suggests expanding definition related to both age and gender.  7.8% of the offenders were female.  4% of the cases were sister-sister sexual abuse, 3.8%  were sister abuse of brother. Noted that male and female offenders inflicted the same severity of sexual abuse 
Krishnakumar P; K. Satheesan, M. G. Geeta & K. Sureshkumar 2013 Prevalence and Spectrum of Sexual Abuse Among Adolescents in Kerala, South India The Indian Journal of Pediatrics       Child victim, adult perp
A self- report survey 1,614 15–19 yr olds in selected schools. 36% of boys & 25% of girls reported that they had experienced sexual abuse at some point during their lifetime. Most instances were sexual advances (forcible kissing and genital groping) while using public transport.
Krug, R. S. 1989 Adult male reports of childhood sexual abuse by mothers: Case descriptions, motivations and long-term consequences.  Child Abuse and Neglect 13, 111-119     Child victim, adult perp
Small sample size multiple interviews with eight survivors (a total of 29 interviews), this article examines the impact of maternal sexual abuse on daughters
Krug,E.G., Mercy,J.A., Dahlberg L.L. & Zwi A.B. eds 2002 World report on violence and healh.  Geneva, World Health Organization.         Legal issues or research issues
Reports of rate of sexual coercion against men by women was 13.4% in Tanzania and 20% in Peru. 
Krugman,S, Mata,L., & Krugman R  1992 Sexual abuse and corporal punishment during childhood: a pilot retorspectie survey of university students in Costa Rica. .  Pediatrics 90(1), 157-161     Legal issues or research issues
2.1% of the female victims were sexually abused by their mothers; 36.8% of the males and 8% of the females were sexually victimized by a woman. 
Kubik E.K, Hecker, J.E. & Righthand, S 2002 Adolescent females who have sexually offended: Comparisons with delinquent adolescent female offenders and adolescent males who sexually offended Journal of Child Sexual Abuse 11(3), 63-83     Legal issues or research issues
N=11 adolescent F.S.O. compared to matched adolescent non-sexual offenders. Both groups had high levels of cognitive distortions about their offending but the S.O.s level was higher
Kubik, E. K. & Hecker, J. E. 2005 Cognitive Distortions About Sex and Sexual Offending: A Comparison of Sex Offending Girls, Delinquent Girls, and Girls from the Community.  Journal of Child Sexual Abuse 14(4), 43-69     Child/adolescent perp
N=11 adolescent F.S.O. compared to 33 age matched non-sexual female offenders, used vignettes of child-adolescent sexual interactions and values questionnaire. F.S.O.s were more likely to agree w/ questionnaire items that remove blame from offender, view victim as responsible. Oddly, they also had less positive attitude towards Contraception.
Kubik, E. K., Hecker, J. E., & Righthand, S. 2002 Adolescent females who have sexually offended: Comparisons with delinquent adolescent female offenders and adolescent males who sexually offended  Journal of Child Sexual Abuse 11(3), 63-83     Child/adolescent perp
N=11 adolescent F.S.O. compared to matched adolescent non-sexual offenders. Both groups had high levels of cognitive distortions about their offending but the S.O.s level was higher.
Kuyper, L., de Wit, J., Smolenski, D., Adam, P., Woertman, L., & van Berlo, W. 2013 Gender differences in patterns of experienced sexual coercion and associated vulnerability factors among young people in The Netherlands Journal of interpersonal violence.       Child victim, adult perp
Online study of 1,319 young adults (16-25) from The Netherlands. Most common type sexual coercion both males and females reported experiencing was nagging, insisting and becoming angry or being taken advantage of while intoxicated.
Lab, Damon D. &Estelle Moore 2005 Prevalence and denial of sexual abuse in a male psychiatric inpatient population Journal of Traumatic Stress 18, (4) 323–330, 2005     Child victim, adult perp
               
Lab,D.D., Feigenbau, J.D., & DeSilva, P. 2008 Mental health professionals' attitudes and practices towards male childhoold sexual abuse. Child abuse & neglect 24(3), 391-409     Specifically on male victims
N=179 psychologists, psychiatrists and nurses were asked 10 questions regarding their attitudes and actions regarding male sexual victimization.  Majority didn't ask about it, didn't know facts on the topic, didn't have training in the assessment or treatment of male victims. 
LaFortune-Brown, A.W.A. 2012 Gendered Media; a study of how newspapers frame educators involvement in statutory rape according to the gender of the adult  Masters thesis       Child victim, adult perp
Using cross tabulations, a quantitative content analysis was conducted. There are four key findings. First, the data show that newspapers will label male educators as predators more often than their female counterpart. Second, newspapers use more gentle and lenient language in their description of female educators who sexual abuse their students. Third, newspapers will use the term mentally ill more often in their description of female sexual offenders than a male sexual offender. These three key findings supports that the use of inflammatory descriptive terms or placating terms is dependent upon the gender of the offender and not the seriousness of their crime. In addition to these findings, this study also shows that American newspapers use more inflammatory language toward educators who sexually offend while United Kingdom newspapers use more innocuous terms. This may be attributed to the fact that it has only been since 2003 that sexual crimes against children by educators are treated more seriously by the Crown Prosecutors. 49% of the victims were male, 38.6% of the offenders were female
Lam, A., Mitchell, J., & Seto, M. C. 2010 Lay Perceptions of Child Pornography Offenders.  Canadian Journal of Criminology and Criminal Justice 52(2), 173-201     Child victim, adult perp
               
Lambert, S. 2008 Issues in female sexual offending Unpublished doctoral thesis   University College Cork   Child victim, adult perp
               
Lambert, S., & Hammond, S. 2009 Perspectives on Female Sexual Offending in an Irish Context  Irish Journal of Applied Social Studies 1(9)     Child victim, adult perp
               
Lambert, S., & O’Halloran, E. 2008 Deductive thematic analysis of a female paedophilia website.  Psychiatry, Psychology and Law 15(2), 284-300     Child victim, adult perp
               
Lambert,S., & O'Halloran,E 2008 Deductive theatic analysis of a female paedophilia website Psychiatry, Psychology and Law 15(2), 284-300     Legal issues or research issues
 
Lamy,S., Delayenne H., & Thibaut,F 2015 A case of female hypersexuality and child abuse and review archives of women's mental health pages 1-3     Child victim, adult perp
Single case study of a mother with mental retardation (sic) and hypersexuality who victimized her son. 
Landor, Roland V.; Susana A. 2012 Eisenchlas “Coming Clean” on Duty of Care: Australian Print Media’s Representation of Male Versus Female Sex Offenders in Institutional Contexts Sexuality & Culture 16, 4, 486-502     Child victim, adult perp
               
Lane, K. E., & Gwartney-Gibbs, P. A. 1985 Violence in the context of dating and sex Journal of Family Issues 6(1), 45-59     Child victim, adult perp
325 students with modified version of Conflict Tactics Scale, 1% of the women threatened to end a relationship if their partner didn’t have intercourse with them, 2.2% reported using continual pressure to obtain intercourse, 2.5% insulted partner to obtain sex, 1.8% got their partner drunk or high to get sex. About 1% of the women threatened or actually used force to get intercourse.
Lane, S., & Lobanov-Rostovsky, C. 1997 Special populations: Children, females, the developmentally disabled, and violent youth  Juvenile Sexual Offending: Causes, Consequences and Correction 322- 359 San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass Publishers G. Ryan & S. Lane Out-dated, erroneous, etc.
lumps women, intellectually impaired and minors all together
Lane,K.E., & Gwartney-Gibbs,P.A. 1985 Violence in the context of dating and sex Journal of Family Issues 6(1), 45-59     Legal issues or research issues
325 students with modified version of Conflict Tactics Scale, 1% of the women threatened to end a relationship if their partner didn't have intercourse with them, 2.2% reported using continual pressure to obtain intercourse, 2.5% insulted partner to obtain sex, 1.8% got their partner drunk or high to get sex.  About 1% of the women threatened or actually used force to get intercourse.
Langstrom,N., & Hanson, R.K. 2006 High rates of  sexual behavior in the general populaton: Correlates and predictors Archives of sexual behavior 35(1), 37-52     Legal issues or research issues
Both males and females with paraphilia report a high rate of sex partners, of sexual behavior and of sexual appetite/drive.   Data from N=2,450 Swedish males/females from 1996 national survey.  Was a representative, non-clinical sample.  For both sexes, there was an association between paraphilic sexual interests and hypersexuality (equally strong correlation). For both sexes, impersonal or sociosexuality was correlated with relational instability, substance use, general life dissatisfaction.  Hypersexuality in female was associated with being younger, having parents who separated during one's childhood, early onset age of intercourse, paraphilic interests, and STDs/
Lapierre, Vanessa & Christian C. Joyal 2015 Describing Perpetrators of Unknown Rapes: A Qualitative Analysis of Autobiographical Accounts from 676 Victims Poster Session ATSA 10/15/15       Legal issues or research issues
Used data from 2013 social media site on rape episodes that were never reported to police.  N=619 women, N=40 men with 3% of perpetrators listed as female. 
Larimer, M., Lydum, A., Anderson, B., & Turner, A. 1999 Male and female recipients of unwanted sexual contact in a college student sample: Prevalence rates, alcohol use, and depression symptoms.  Sex Roles: A Journal of Research 40, 295-308     Adult victim, adult perp
Overall, 34 men (20.7%) reported being the recipients of one or more of the five types of unwanted sexual contact on the SES, whereas 7 women (5.3%) reported instigating one or more of these types of unwanted sexual contact. Gender differences in overall preferences were not statistically significant.
Larson, N. R., & Maison, S. R. 1987 Psychosexual Treatment Program for Female Sex Offenders: Training Manual     St. Paul, MN: Minnesota Department of Corrections, Minnesota Correctional Facility-Stillwater.   Assessment or treatment related
               
Larson, N. R., & Maison, S. R. 1995 Psychosexual treatment program for women sex offenders in a prison setting.  Acta Sexologica 1(1), 81-113     Assessment or treatment related
               
Laury, G. V. 1992 When women sexually abuse male psychiatric patients under their care. Journal of Sex Education and Therapy 18 (1), 11-16     Adult victim, adult perp
               
Lawson, C 1993 Mother-son sexual abuse: Rare or under-reported? A critique of the research.  Child Abuse & Neglect 17(2), 261-269     Specifically on male victims
Notes that male victims often won’t disclose until they are in long-term therapeutic relationship.
Lawson, C. 1991 Clinical assessment of mother-son sexual abuse  Clinical Social Work Journal 19(4), 391-403     Specifically on male victims
               
Lawson, L. 2008 Female Sex Offenders' Relationship Experiences. [285] Violence and Victims 23(3), 331-343     Child victim, adult perp
Occasionally an offender took responsibility for the effect of her offense on her family but in general, offenders blamed their offenses on someone else. The 20 offenders had 28 reported victims. The victim's average age was 14 years (range 8-17); 22 were adolescents aged 13-17. There were 13 female victims and 15 male victims. The boys and girls were the same average age. In general, people were seen as disrespectful, judgmental and immature. Men in particular were seen as arrogant and demanding; women were thought to be bitchy and untrustworthy. They were almost exclusively self-referential. When discussing their offense, for example, they generally reported how it made them feel. When asked about the effects of the offense, they described the effect on themselves, most often in terms of what happened when they got caught. In the rare instances in which they answered questions about why they did what they did, they answered in terms of emotions and relationships, rarely acknowledging any sort of sexual response. When they verbalized their regret or said how bad they felt about what they had done, it was in relation to how their behavior had affected them. They expressed little regret for the impact on the victim. The ways these women behaved in social relationships reduced their chances of meeting their physical and personal needs. They could not see that their inability to meet their life goals was the result of their own actions, so they felt out of control of their lives and did not know why.
Le Bodic, Cédric, and Fabien Gouriou. 2010 La criminalité sexuelle commise par des femmes: critique méthodologique et épistémologique de quelques travaux nord-américains et français. (Sexual crimes committed by women: methodological and epistemological critique of some North American studies and French) L'Evolution Psychiatrique 75, no. 1 (2010): 93-106     Child victim, adult perp
               
Lee, D. 2000 Hegemonic masculinity and male feminisation: The sexual harassment of men at work. Journal of Gender Studies 9(2), 141-155     Child victim, adult perp
               
Lehrer, Jocelyn A , Evelyn L. Lehrer and Mary P. Koss 2012 Unwanted Sexual Experiences in Young Men: Evidence from a Survey of University Students in Chile  Archives of Sexual Behavior       Child victim, adult perp
The public health problem of unwanted sexual experiences (USE) in male youths has received little attention. In this study, we examined prevalence of USE, risk factors, contexts, and barriers to disclosure with data from a quantitative survey of students enrolled in General Education courses at a public university in Chile. This study focused on the male sample (N = 466). Approximately 20.4 % of participants reported some form of USE since age 14. Forced sex through physical coercion, forced sex through verbal coercion or while intoxicated, attempted forced sex, and less severe forms of USE were reported by 0.2, 10.1, 1.4, and 8.7 % of participants, respectively. USE before age 14 was reported by 9.4 % of participants and was a significant predictor of USE since age 14. The perpetrator of USE since age 14 was most commonly identified as a date/partner or friend/acquaintance; other findings on contexts and barriers to disclosure were also generally consistent with previous results in the literature. In addition, we found substantial co-occurrence of USE since age 14 with two other forms of coercion: physical dating violence victimization and coerced condom non-use. The study findings indicate a need for further attention to these public health problems and have implications for the development of violence and HIV/STI prevention programs for adolescent boys and young adult men in Chile and elsewhere. Evidence on the prevalence of USE in adolescent boys and young adult men is limited. In a multinational study of students enrolled in 38 universities, past-year physical coercion to have sex was reported by 2.8 % of male students who had been in a heterosexual relationship in the past year; the corresponding figure for verbal coercion was 22.0 % (Hines, 2007). In a sample drawn from 12 U.S. colleges, 22.2 % of male participants reported some form of USE over their lifetime, with 8.3 % reporting severe USE (involving threats and/or force) (Tewksbury & Mustaine, 2001). In a survey of University of Costa Rica students, 12.8 % of male students reported some form of USE before age 18 (Krugman, Mata, & Krugman, 1992). Approximately 10.5 % of men reported at least one lifetime USE occurrence in a survey of university students in Italy (Romito & Grassi, 2007). Analyses based on study populations outside the educational sector in various countries have also reported variable prevalence estimates (Cáceres, 2005; Choudhary et al., 2010; Olsson et al., 2000). In Chile’s 2000 National Survey of Sexual Behavior, administered to a representative urban sample of adults, 1.9 % of male participants responded affirmatively to the question “Have you ever been a victim of rape?” (Goldstein et al., 2000); other forms of USE were not assessed. The section in the questionnaire on USE began with a paragraph that established a context for recalling a range of such experiences, including incidents in which the participant may have been “asleep, drunk, or otherwise incapacitated,” and where “sex” was defined as vaginal, oral or anal sex. Participants were then asked to respond “yes” or “no” to the following items regarding USE since age 14: (1) someone tried to make me have sex by using threats, arguments or physical force, but this did not happen; (2) someone forced me to have sex using physical force; (3) someone forced me to have sex using threats or other verbal pressures; (4) someone had sex with me after I had been drinking or using drugs, and I was not in a condition to be able to stop what was happening; (5) aside from the types of sexual contact already mentioned, have you experienced any USE, such as forced kissing or grabbing? The participants ranged in age from 17 to 30 years, with a median of 20 years. Approximately 80.3 % lived in Santiago or another large urban area at age 14. A cross-tabulation of urbanicity and living arrangements showed a strong association: 90.7 % of the participants who lived in an urban area at age 14 resided in the parental home while attending college (p < .01). Other descriptive statistics are shown in Table 1. Approximately 9.4 % of participants reported USE before age 14; the perpetrators in the incidents viewed as most severe by the participants were most commonly a friend (23.1 %) and a family member or partner of family member (20.5 %). Other perpetrators were a boyfriend/girlfriend (15.4 %), sexual partner (2.5 %), classmate (7.7 %), teacher (2.6 %), stranger (2.6 %), and “other adult” (15.4 %); the remaining cases correspond to no recall (5.1 %) and no response (5.1 %). Panel A in Table 2 shows the percentage of participants who responded affirmatively to each USE item; some participants reported more than one form of USE. Approximately 77.1 % of incidents of forced sex since age 14 occurred when the participant was under the influence of alcohol or other drugs, unable to stop what was happening. Panel B classifies participants by the most severe form of USE since age 14. Overall, 20.4 % of the sample reported some form of USE in this period. The most severe type was physically-forced sex for 0.2 % of the sample and forced sex through verbal coercion or while intoxicated for 10.1 %. The dependent variable used in the multivariate models was based on the mutually exclusive categories in Panel B: it equals 3 (forced sex/attempts, 11.7 %), 2 (other forms of USE, 8.7 %) or 1 (no USE, 79.6 %). The perpetrator of the most severe incident in childhood was a family member or partner of a family member in eight cases (20.5 %). When we re-estimated Model 2 excluding these cases (to address the concern that our results might be driven by re-victimization by the same person), the AOR decreased but remained large and statistically significant. Participants who reported USE since age 14 (N = 85; 20.4 %) were asked questions about the contexts and disclosure of the incident since age 14 they viewed as most severe; the response rate for these items was approximately 80.0 %. The perpetrator was most commonly identified as a friend, other student, or acquaintance (50.7 %). Other common assailants were boyfriend/girlfriend or ex-boyfriend/ex-girlfriend (20.9 %) and a date (13.4 %). The remaining cases were reported to have involved strangers (7.5 %), family members (6.0 %) and teachers (1.5 %). The most commonly reported locations were a party (49.3 %) and the perpetrator or victim’s home (29.9 %). Consumption of alcohol and/or other drugs by the victim only, perpetrator only, or both, was involved in 8.7, 11.6, and 43.5 % of cases, respectively. Among participants who indicated USE since age 14, 74.3 % told someone about the incident; 65.7 % told a friend, 2.9 % told a psychologist or social worker, and none told a physician. None of the incidents of forced sex or attempts were reported to the police; the most frequently-endorsed reason for not doing so was “I did not think that what happened was sufficiently serious, or a crime” (50.0 %). Other salient reasons were “I wasn’t sure that the person who did this really wanted to hurt me” (14.3 %); “I felt ashamed” (14.3 %); “fear of revenge from the person who did this” (9.5 %), and “if I told the police, they would not respond” (7.1 %). Among participants who reported any lifetime USE (N = 108), 68.0 % indicated that the perpetrators had been “women only”; the other response options were “women and men” (11.5 %) and “men only” (20.5 %). The response rate for this survey item was 72.2 %. Approximately 32.0 % of study participants who reported any lifetime USE (before and/or since age 14) indicated that some or all of the perpetrators were men. A similar result was found in a study of university students in Italy, where one-third of lifetime USE reported by men involved male perpetrators (Romito & Grassi, 2007). Focusing on the complement of this statistic, approximately two-thirds of participants who reported any lifetime USE indicated female perpetrators only. Related research based on two community samples of young heterosexual men in Germany found that 25.1–30.1 % of participants had experienced female-perpetrated USE and that most men described these incidents as “moderately upsetting” (Krahé, Scheinberger-Olwig, & Bieneck, 2003); as emphasized by the authors of this study, it is unclear whether these findings (and similar earlier findings in the literature) reflect a genuine lack of strong adverse effects, or denial/minimization. A possible contributing factor is the inclusion of relatively “minor” incidents, such as forced kisses, in some USE definitions (Peterson et al., 2011). In addition, psychological impacts of coercion perpetrated by women may be mitigated by the fact that sexual activity with a woman, even under circumstances of coercion, is congruent with the stereotypical male role, unlike sexual activity with a man (Struckman-Johnson & Struckman-Johnson, 1994).
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Lev,A.I, & Lev,S 1999 Sexual assault in the lesbian,gay,bisexual and transgendered communities.  In J.C. McClennen & J. Gunther (Eds.) A Professional's Guide to Understanding Gay and Lesbian Domestic Violence: Understanding Practice Interventions 35-61 Lewiston NY: Edwin Mellen   Assessment or treatment related
 
Levenson, J.S., Willis, G.M., & Prescott,D.S. 2014 Adverse Childhood Experiences in the Lives of Male Sex Offenders Implications for Trauma-Informed Care Sexual buse: a journal of research and treatment pages 1-20     Assessment or treatment related
Used Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) scale; noted abuse, neglect, plus household dysfunction such as domestic violence, family drug abuse, incarcerated or mentally ill parent.  N=679 M.S.O.'s  Non-random sample either in civil commitment or outpt sex offender treatment in U.S. Majority (2/3) index offense against a minor. 42% had history of physical abuse, 38% had history of childhood sexual abuse, higher prevalence rates than males in the general/community population.  Higher ACE scores correlated with less education, more arrests (non-sexual), use of force/violence during sex crime, injury of crime victim and contact (as opposed to non-contact) sex crimes. 
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Levine, K. L. 2006 No Penis, No Problem [292] Fordham Urban Law Journal   Emory Public Law Research Paper No. 05-37   Legal issues or research issues
               
Levine, K. L. 2009 When Gender Meets Sex: An Exploratory Study of Women Who Seduce Adolescent Boys [294] William and Mary Journal of Women and the Law 15(2),     Child victim, adult perp
use of term “seduce’ is inappropriate
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N=15, 2 of whom had a psychotic disorder, 1 with Schizophrenia, 6 had mental retardation.
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This work rests on a subsample of 219 men from the 1994-1996 Violence and Threats of Violence Against Women and Men in the United States Survey. 29% of male respondents in the NVAW sought medical or psychological help after the assault. Results show that men who presented for help were more likely to have reported being physically injured during the assault and that penetration occurred.
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